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wullie
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We are planing to go to Lancaster this year through the Ribble Link, on saying this to a few people we are met with a sharp intake of breath, and words of your very brave, what i would like to know is am i?  we are just been boating for 6 months and sometimes i worry bought reactions of other boaters, all advice appreciated.

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Plenty of videos on YouTube, take a look and judge for yourself!

Not done it yet, but it is a tidal passage where you need to push against the tide, so more stressing on the engine than other tidal passages in a narrowboat, at least that is what I understand.

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Prepare your boat with sucking any water and sludge from the bottom of the fuel tank. Service the engine and clean fuel filters check fan belts and have spare filters and belts. Anchor must be set out so you can deploy it if necessary and secure the bitter end to the boat, it is no use under the bed. Life jackets for all crew. You will leave Tarleton river lock before high tide and push against the tide down the Douglas and with the tide  up the Ribble to Savick brook. Choose a neap tide and avoid the high spring tide. The Lancaster is a lovely area to visit. There is a width restriction in Savick brook.

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Many boats make this crossing successfully every year. The actual navigation is straight forward if you follow the Skipper's Guide (link below) and there will be other boats with you. As mentioned  in the previous post, the main issues that arise are fuel/overheating related so preparation is key. Don't be put off doing this, it's a great experience and the Lancaster canal is wonderful.  https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/refresh/media/thumbnail/30977-ribble-link-skippers-guide.pdf

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It's been a while but there are a few previous threads if you do a search.  

Believe it or not some friends of ours did it as their first ever narrowboat trip - in a 30 foot Springer with the old gutless Ducatti.  But, that was a fresh water cooled engine so they could run it flat out with no danger of overheating.  Many narrowboats (with skin tank cooling) are not designed for prolonged high speed running, just make sure yours can handle it without overheating.  

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14 minutes ago, Neil2 said:

It's been a while but there are a few previous threads if you do a search.  

Believe it or not some friends of ours did it as their first ever narrowboat trip - in a 30 foot Springer with the old gutless Ducatti.  But, that was a fresh water cooled engine so they could run it flat out with no danger of overheating.  Many narrowboats (with skin tank cooling) are not designed for prolonged high speed running, just make sure yours can handle it without overheating.  

Yes, and sometimes there is a tendency to rev higher than necessary to get to the other side as quickly as possible. On a decent tide the time window gives you enough time to get across with a typical narrowboat engine at a reasonable pace without having to thrash the engine excessively, although fairly high revs are always required. If the temperature gauge gets too high ease back on the revs a bit if you can. 

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If you have keel cooling and an engine heated calorifier, make sure you fill the water tank before starting. Then, if the engine does overheat you can open the domestic hot water taps and run the hot water to waste. Cold water will fill the calorifier and help with the engine cooling.

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As said, its very much a tidal waterway, and there are check you should make to your boat.

However we have done it, and enjoyed it, even if we had significant issues with our fire (steam boat) due to using fairly unsuitable coal for the trip.

Have you done any other river work or similar in your time?

 

Daniel

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  • 2 weeks later...

There's really nothing to worry about. When you go out of Tarleton the tide does come at you quite strong and the pace is quite slow for about 20 minutes after that it's no different to any tidal river and probably easier than some.

Take the usual precautions as mentioned above and enjoy.

The link IMO is one of the highlights of the waterways system. My mate just bought his first boat and is heading that way in May.

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On 3/21/2017 at 09:04, wullie said:

We are planing to go to Lancaster this year through the Ribble Link, on saying this to a few people we are met with a sharp intake of breath, and words of your very brave, what i would like to know is am i?  we are just been boating for 6 months and sometimes i worry bought reactions of other boaters, all advice appreciated.

There are many scare stories re boating. The one oft bandied about is the TIDAL TRENT :o aaaarrrgggghhhhhh :rolleyes: its a superb and safe piece of waterways that done with a sensible approach is fine and interesting. I havnt done the ribble jobby as my last few boats have all been too big but listen to those WHO HAVE done it not those that have read about it. Prepare your boat sensibly and with decent weather as a bonus all will be well.

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24 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

There are many scare stories re boating. The one oft bandied about is the TIDAL TRENT :o aaaarrrgggghhhhhh :rolleyes: its a superb and safe piece of waterways that done with a sensible approach is fine and interesting. I havnt done the ribble jobby as my last few boats have all been too big but listen to those WHO HAVE done it not those that have read about it. Prepare your boat sensibly and with decent weather as a bonus all will be well.

If someone is giving the horror story routine just ask them one simple question.

"Have you been?"

Usually shuts them up. :rolleyes:

  • Greenie 1
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15 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

If someone is giving the horror story routine just ask them one simple question.

"Have you been?"

Usually shuts them up. :rolleyes:

I had this the other day. There was I happily singing along in the shower, when a cry from the kitchen "Have you been?" how did she know? It soon shut me up:)

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We went onto the Lancaster via the Ribble link and wished we had booked for a longer period, it was very enjoyable although shallow in some places. As always with boating care must be taken and when on the rivers make sure you stay in the channel. An elderly couple didn't take the care that was needed on the return trip and ended up being beached, fortunately we managed to drag them off with some difficulty. Didn't even get a thank you, only a "well that's your good deed for the day". Suppose it takes all sorts.

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The Ribble is fun. We did it with a JP2 which is 18hp albeit with a lot of torque and it was fine. The main thing is to know the cooling system is up to scratch. You will be working the engine hard for a few hours or more....much harder than most rivers. Check all the levels before you go on the engine. Also realise that you might be held up if the weather is too windy or visibility bad  

Loved the Lancaster too. Enjoy the trip

  • Greenie 1
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Agree , take the precautions suggested . There used to be an elderly gentleman who very kindly comes onto your boat and shows you a couple of pics of the Ashland lamp and the entrance to Savick Brook.  Good binoculars help to see the lamp, for the turn . The Brook is very narrow in places and makes for an interesting trip up to the locks . On our last crossing , we were following friends, giving them about 5 mins in front of us, as you turn into Savick brook the current can push you towards Preston . Put some power on to get in ..... as we arrived at the floating pontoon our friend was the opposite hanging on and treading water . The pontoon was wet and he had slipped in . So take care as there's no ladder or land connection.  But enjoy . 

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