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Paint that won't dry.


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Hi all,

 

Some of you may remember a few months ago I wanted to clean all the blacking out of our old water tank in order to turn it into a diesel tank.

 

The recommendation was to pour in diesel to dissolve the bitumen then soak it up. It half worked. I now have a tank in which the sides are covered in sticky bitumen diesel stuff that just does not want to dry.

 

Anyway - I came up with another solution to the diesel tank problem so now just want to use the old tank as a storage box. Problem is the black paint is getting everywhere.

 

Does anyone have any good ideas to dry it out. The best idea I can come up with is to get some dry cement powder and throw it at the walls in order to absorb the bitumen. It would make a very very thin layer of cement but that wont be a problem right? Plus I heard of blacking a hull using this method.

 

I can't just finish the job and get the blacking out because unforeseen to me was the fact that the walls are rusty and therefore porous and its going to take a hell of a lot of diesel to clean it all out.

 

Thanks!

 

Doodlebug

 

  • Greenie 1
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It will come off fine, with a powerful enough solvent. You want something that's powerful enough to rapidly work, but not evaporate too quick. Its probably worth pointing out, that anything effective is also going to be highly flammable and raw honk in a confined space too.

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Problem is it is in an enclosed space. Petrol works well but I really don't think its a good idea. Some dry powder would just stick to the surface and solve the problem. Problem is the only fine powder I can buy is cement or plaster.

 

Sand would be too course.

 

Ahh - actually ash from the fire might work?


Then again it will stink

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Hi all,

 

Some of you may remember a few months ago I wanted to clean all the blacking out of our old water tank in order to turn it into a diesel tank.

 

The recommendation was to pour in diesel to dissolve the bitumen then soak it up. It half worked. I now have a tank in which the sides are covered in sticky bitumen diesel stuff that just does not want to dry.

 

Anyway - I came up with another solution to the diesel tank problem so now just want to use the old tank as a storage box. Problem is the black paint is getting everywhere.

 

Does anyone have any good ideas to dry it out. The best idea I can come up with is to get some dry cement powder and throw it at the walls in order to absorb the bitumen. It would make a very very thin layer of cement but that wont be a problem right? Plus I heard of blacking a hull using this method.

 

I can't just finish the job and get the blacking out because unforeseen to me was the fact that the walls are rusty and therefore porous and its going to take a hell of a lot of diesel to clean it all out.

 

Thanks!

 

Doodlebug

 

 

The use of cement when blacking a hull used to be a common thing in the Netherlands when blacking a barge bottom, but this was only a bit of cement dust thrown against the wet tar in order to be able to see where it hadn't been touched for the second (third) coat.

 

Peter.

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Put a cat in it.

Make sure it can't get out.

Bang the sides with a cricket bat.

Repeat with new cat until inside is gleaming clean.

Sorry to all cat lovers, but that's the funniest picture. Greenie ;)

Rog

Talc?

Good idea. It apparently causes cancer to put it in the usual places (no I don't mean the bathroom)

Rog

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Put a cat in it.

 

Make sure it can't get out.

 

Bang the sides with a cricket bat.

 

Repeat with new cat until inside is gleaming clean.

 

There is absolutely nothing funny about animal cruelty jokes. But posting this kind of garbage says a lot about you, none of it good!

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I have no idea of size, or access of the tank, or whatever.

Is the bitumen inside the tank. If it's full of diesel, it won't dry out anyway.

When in use, the bitumen will dissolve in the diesel and will be picked up by the filter or will get burnt.

Or, if safe, set fire to it, or burn it off with a gas lamp, and if accessible, scrape and wire brush, was out with water, and dry it.

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There is absolutely nothing funny about animal cruelty jokes. But posting this kind of garbage says a lot about you, none of it good!

I suppose we can't tell camel jokes either unsure.png

 

 

 

.............. hey lighten up a little, or are we now to include cats in the Racial Discrimination Act?

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That sounds like you have been talking to bizzard.

 

Neil

 

You don't think much good of bizzard by the sound of it, I'm sure that he couldn't be cruel and heartless towards animals, and he's living with a cat on his boat.

 

Peter.

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i was a cable jointer on the old electricity boards.the joints were filled with bitumen. We used to clean our tools with a rag soaked in paraffin it worked really well. Often used a blow lamp to soften the tar first.

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In view of PaulG2's post, I suppose I ought not to host handy chimney sweeping tip No 4, tie a brick to a chickens foot and put them down the chimney!

 

Make sure the fire's out, or the brick might explode due to trapped moisture. If unsure, stick the chicken UP the chimney and ramp the fire up.

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