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How do you feel, when someone hits you?


Ricco1

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I've only been aboard for 6 months so don't claim to be an expert, not by any stretch of the imagination. I've had a couple of dodgy situations, and clipped another boat once, which made me feel terrible. Strong winds don't help, no doubt about that.

 

Yesterday I was enjoying a cuppa when this boat went past, pretty close. The 'helmsperson' was moving the tiller frantically from one side to another, the engine revving quite seriously. Her boating partner was prodding at oncoming boats with her bargepole, trying (unsuccessfully) to avoid hitting and generally bumping into at least 3 boats. When she hit mine I went outside, just had a look around and at the ensuing carnage, didn't say a word.

 

Was that the right thing to do, should we all accept that boating is a type of (quite slow) contact sport?

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There will always be certain conditions when weather may catch out an inexperienced or unwary boater.

 

It may have happened to many members of CWDF.

 

However, boating is not a contact sport, I find that the 'sport' element of boating is NOT making contact, (unless I'm tying up to it!)

 

If your mooring is attracting a deal of unwarranted of physical attention from boats, (for whatever reason) then you may consider changing it (if that's practical)

 

Although from your description it would appear that the 'Jousting nit' (typo - I should have put Knight) is possibly inexperienced/new boater/buffoon.

 

I have heard a number of boaters boast that boating is a contact sport - - I suggest that it's not!

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It depends how I am hit. If someone has got in a pickle, and is trying to get out of it, perhaps unsuccessfully, I might offer some advice, one bit of which might be to stop and take stock, ( depending on the circumstances, this might be pleasant advice, or there might be the odd swear word in it). If appropriate, I might offer to hop aboard and help.

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Interesting one. If you're on a bend, and the canal is narrow, a boater might find they're unable to navigate the curve, because to get the bow to go left, they have to swing the stern to the right, and if there's not enough space to do so, the bow will go straight...and things can get hairy. Now add a crosswind, and it's a lot worse. The reason the tiller person had the engine revving, is possibly to try and force some sideways stern movement, to get the darn bow to shift over in a hurry.

 

Bowthrusters solve these issues, but I'm happy not to rely on one.

 

:)

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I've only been aboard for 6 months so don't claim to be an expert, not by any stretch of the imagination. I've had a couple of dodgy situations, and clipped another boat once, which made me feel terrible. Strong winds don't help, no doubt about that.

 

Yesterday I was enjoying a cuppa when this boat went past, pretty close. The 'helmsperson' was moving the tiller frantically from one side to another, the engine revving quite seriously. Her boating partner was prodding at oncoming boats with her bargepole, trying (unsuccessfully) to avoid hitting and generally bumping into at least 3 boats. When she hit mine I went outside, just had a look around and at the ensuing carnage, didn't say a word.

 

Was that the right thing to do, should we all accept that boating is a type of (quite slow) contact sport?

 

 

No. Anyone claiming it is a contact sport is just showing themselves to be a bit of a twat, and using it as an excuse to cover up their failure to control their boat.

 

Far better if you bump a boat to say 'sorry mate, have I caused any damage?' to which they'll reply 'no don't worry. it's fine', than to say when glared at after bumping 'yeah well it's a contact sport'. This just annoys people!

 

I think you played it fine. It takes a pretty big thump after all, to actually cause any damage.

 

MtB

 

 

P.S. And I note they were both girls, for which us blokes have to make allowances.... ninja.gif

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
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If someone has knocked me by mistake, not hard, and particularly if they apologizes if it is warranted, no harm, no foul.

If someone hits me hard enough to potentially do serious damage and because they're acting like a raving idiot, as happened last year, they get to meet The Banshee.

 

The last person who cheerfully told me that "boating is a contact sport" when they hit my moored boat with no good reason and really what they meant to say was "sorry, my mistake," got the reply from me that boxing is also a contact sport, but you don't see boxers leaping out of the ring and decking the spectators... Usually.

The mad glint in my eye made them remove themselves fairly quickly.

I am possibly making myself sound more aggressive/looking for a row than I actually am, but there is no good reason why anyone should hit me where I moor, and if someone hits me hard, it can only because they are going too fast with not enough control, and ergo could have prevented it.

Edited by Starcoaster
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I pride myself on being skillful at maneuvering our 60 nb but on a couple of occasions I lost concentration for a second or two in a strong crosswind and was forced alongside some moored boats, nothing could be done except to wait for a lull in the wind.

 

Sometimes all the skill in the world just aint enough and once at a point of no return you are a passenger of the laws of physics.

 

Boating is a trying to avoid contact sport.

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I've only been aboard for 6 months so don't claim to be an expert, not by any stretch of the imagination. I've had a couple of dodgy situations, and clipped another boat once, which made me feel terrible. Strong winds don't help, no doubt about that.

 

Yesterday I was enjoying a cuppa when this boat went past, pretty close. The 'helmsperson' was moving the tiller frantically from one side to another, the engine revving quite seriously. Her boating partner was prodding at oncoming boats with her bargepole, trying (unsuccessfully) to avoid hitting and generally bumping into at least 3 boats. When she hit mine I went outside, just had a look around and at the ensuing carnage, didn't say a word.

 

Was that the right thing to do, should we all accept that boating is a type of (quite slow) contact sport?

 

Boater hit by another boat....'read all about it'.....

 

Just what was the 'ensuing carnage'..

 

.hucking fell. Total none story of the week.

  • Greenie 1
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As regards maneuvering, even the best have had their pride given a kick in the rivets from time to time. Apologies extended and moving on is the best action. Personally I have an extreme dislike for left hand bends when there is traffic approaching, that's were most of my mishaps take place. Usually finishing up against the side of the cut, calling myself names because I seen it coming and was unable to prevent it.

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The only comments I would add to the abiove are:

 

  • in this situation, I would far rather be hit (gently) by another boat, drifting sideways, than have my paint scratched by someone prodding with a bargepole - which (as you say in this case) is usually ineffectual.
  • When manouvering in the boatyard - usually solo - I normally put a couple of big squashy fenders out, as reversing in a cross wind into my mooring can be a bit tricky.
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Wanted" data-cid="1276536" data-date="Today, 01:11 AM, on 31 Mar 2014 - 01:11 AM, said:

^ totally none post of the week

 

Have another greenie to add to the inevitable haul which usually goes with having a pop at me (and a couple of other posters on here)...I am happy to award you one even though unlike my post you didn't actually answer the OP's question which was

 

"How do you feel, when someone hits you?"

 

- My answer being in the circumstances described it is completely and utterly matter less and barely worthy of comment. Unless some serious damage is done or some body was hurt or the cause was blatant recklessness on the part of someone else.

 

 

matty40s" data-cid="1276555" data-date="Today, 04:39 AM, on 31 Mar 2014 - 04:39 AM, said:

21132

 

Who put you in charge of the post count police?

 

To answer the question - boating is NOT a contact sport but (as per my OP in the thread indicates) collisions between boats are unfortunately very common whether it be due to the ineptness of one or both steerers or one or both of them being caught out by something unexpected. Most boats are designed to take knocks (quite hard knocks) so ,ensuing carnage' is very unlikely from a glancing blow. More likely with a bow to side blow, which can result in a dent if it is hard enough.

 

So in short nothing to sweat about really. (In my opinion)

Edited by The Dog House
  • Greenie 1
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Being very much the novice, we've been "kissed" twice, both by boats trying to pull out of their moorings and make their way around us. On both occasions, the person at the helm apologized and we said no problem and meant it.

 

On the other hand, we manage to "kiss" Victoria pretty much every time we try to "park" at our allocated mooring spot and feel extremely bad. It's our personal challenge to get into our mooring spot without brushing her stern; so far we've managed it once....water was like glass on that occasion and not a breath of wind. There is never anyone on-board, so no one to apologize to; but our plan is to leave a bottle of wine with a note when we leave the marina for good - not because we've done any damage, just because we feel so bad about it.

 

We also "nudged" other boats out on the cut, the first couple of times we went for a practice cruise. The one word that sums up our feeling for doing it - embarrassed. When there is someone about we apologize and explain we are new and just learning, in the majority of cases the response we get is "don't worry about it, it's a contact sport", or "don't worry, we were all new to this at one time"

 

I don't mean to sound like we are constantly bumping into other boats, skew whiff bridges get kissed by us much more often! When we do nudge something it's on tick over as we make sure we slow right down when approaching other boats and narrow bits on the canal.

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I think describing boating as a contact sport is just a jocular way of saying that occasionally, despite everyone's best efforts, they do come in to contact, and some of the righteous indignation on here is OTT. More aggravating is the attitude that makes any contact, no matter how trivial and unavoidable, a massive trauma - particularly when it leads to locks not being shared or falls from mooring in bloody stupid places.

  • Greenie 1
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I think that it's inevitable,that the odd Rub or bump is going to occur at some point or another. I've only Ever had Two Small none descript bumps,both my fault,both times bumping Structures,rather than Boats, Thankfully in Some 20 odd years, But, conversely, I've been Hit 6 times while I've been in this river over the last year alone !. & EVERY time it's while I've been moored either at the Town Quey, The Public Mooring at Arundel or my own Mooring @ Littlehampton Marina.

Luckily only once did it warrent a claim on there insurance. (Scuffed Paint work about 3ft long down to the Metal on my Cabin Sides and it was a lovely young family,in a fibreglass cabin cruiser that came aboard for a coffee,whilst we

sorted it).

I also think it's about the attitude of the Helmsman when such a thing happens.Some just pretend it didn't happen,and Rigidly look straight ahead with blinkered vision,hoping you didn't see them,others are

genuinely annoyed and or Embarrassed at themselves. My boat is covered by 6 CCTV cameras,that tend to be very useful, if such a thing happens when I'm not aboard.

I just wait to see there reaction, and if

warranted ,, Meet them at there Car to discuss,,!.

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Unfortunately the phrase 'boating is a contact sport' is now - whether one likes it or not - part of narrowboating culture. You hear/read it frequently. It gives those who have little or no regard for other boaters or their boats an excuse to either hit and run or simply to shout out "contact sport, mate!" as they grin and wave as they bump/crash their way past.

 

Boating is a contact sport in the same way that motoring is....i.e. it's not.

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Unfortunately the phrase 'boating is a contact sport' is now - whether one likes it or not - part of narrowboating culture. You hear/read it frequently. It gives those who have little or no regard for other boaters or their boats an excuse to either hit and run or simply to shout out "contact sport, mate!" as they grin and wave as they bump/crash their way past.

 

Boating is a contact sport in the same way that motoring is....i.e. it's not.

I agree entirely...........except for the fact that car bumpers are made of flimsy plastic these days. They don't survive a passionate kiss from another car!!
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I guess it depends on how you are hit. I went into a lock & ended up diagonal across it due to wind. As there was another boat behind me coming into the lock I stepped off with a rope to pull my boat over, but he made no attempt to slow down, & instead rammed my boat really hard, using it as brakes, even though I was steeping off as he did it.
"Haha well it is a contact sport he yelled". The guy was out of order. This was my second day on a boat, & my 8th lock, having shared the previous 7 locks with another boat without any incident at all.

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Being very much the novice, we've been "kissed" twice, both by boats trying to pull out of their moorings and make their way around us. On both occasions, the person at the helm apologized and we said no problem and meant it.

 

On the other hand, we manage to "kiss" Victoria pretty much every time we try to "park" at our allocated mooring spot and feel extremely bad. It's our personal challenge to get into our mooring spot without brushing her stern; so far we've managed it once....water was like glass on that occasion and not a breath of wind. There is never anyone on-board, so no one to apologize to; but our plan is to leave a bottle of wine with a note when we leave the marina for good - not because we've done any damage, just because we feel so bad about it.

 

We also "nudged" other boats out on the cut, the first couple of times we went for a practice cruise. The one word that sums up our feeling for doing it - embarrassed. When there is someone about we apologize and explain we are new and just learning, in the majority of cases the response we get is "don't worry about it, it's a contact sport", or "don't worry, we were all new to this at one time"

 

I don't mean to sound like we are constantly bumping into other boats, skew whiff bridges get kissed by us much more often! When we do nudge something it's on tick over as we make sure we slow right down when approaching other boats and narrow bits on the canal.

Feel free to moor by me anytime! Beer preferred over wine though ;-)
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I think that it's inevitable,that the odd Rub or bump is going to occur at some point or another. I've only Ever had Two Small none descript bumps,both my fault,both times bumping Structures,rather than Boats, Thankfully in Some 20 odd years, But, conversely, I've been Hit 6 times while I've been in this river over the last year alone !. & EVERY time it's while I've been moored either at the Town Quey, The Public Mooring at Arundel or my own Mooring @ Littlehampton Marina.

Luckily only once did it warrent a claim on there insurance. (Scuffed Paint work about 3ft long down to the Metal on my Cabin Sides and it was a lovely young family,in a fibreglass cabin cruiser that came aboard for a coffee,whilst we

sorted it).

I also think it's about the attitude of the Helmsman when such a thing happens.Some just pretend it didn't happen,and Rigidly look straight ahead with blinkered vision,hoping you didn't see them,others are

genuinely annoyed and or Embarrassed at themselves. My boat is covered by 6 CCTV cameras,that tend to be very useful, if such a thing happens when I'm not aboard.

I just wait to see there reaction, and if

warranted ,, Meet them at there Car to discuss,,!.

 

Yours is the only post with a slightly different angle. Everyone else seems to accept these things and only get hot under the collar if the person who caused the collision has a bad attitude. You mentioned an insurance claim...

 

If we compare this to driving cars: A tiny collision causing a small dent inevitably results in the car being garaged for repair, and an insurance claim. The culture is generally different with boats, right?

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"Total carnage" would imply that at least something, or possibly multiple things, got physically damaged.

Did they?

Because, if not, whatever the rights and wrongs of the situation, those words would then seem to me to be excessively emotive.

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