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Mike the Boilerman

Ebay vintage engine sales

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Not to mention it runs on petrol!

Maybe OK for a launch, then.

Would it originally have been for farm use, driving a pump, sawbench or cattle-cake cutter for example?

Although the engine number is 27xx, indicating that they made quite a few, i can find nothing on the internet about them. The only Wilton mentioned is a "Wilton Doxford" producing 7,750 h.p. so i can't imagine it was the same firm.

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Maybe OK for a launch, then.

Would it originally have been for farm use, driving a pump, sawbench or cattle-cake cutter for example?

Although the engine number is 27xx, indicating that they made quite a few, i can find nothing on the internet about them. The only Wilton mentioned is a "Wilton Doxford" producing 7,750 h.p. so i can't imagine it was the same firm.

The Wilton Engine was made in a factory , literally 200 yards down the road from here, on Wilton (!) St in Audenshaw. I understand many engines were supplied to the War Department in WW1 but the firm closed in 1930's. There is no trace of the works , but the street still exists, with houses and a community centre on it. I will be passing the site in a few minutes. Also, in this area the works formerly used by Scott & Hodgson is still occupied, they built large mill engines in the 1000's of horsepower class. A bit further away, in Ashton Under Lyne, is the former National Gas & Oil Engine works, the birthplace of all those narrowboat engines.

I think there is a Wilton engine at the Anson Engine Museum in Poynton.

Bill

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The Wilton Engine was made in a factory , literally 200 yards down the road from here, on Wilton (!) St in Audenshaw. I understand many engines were supplied to the War Department in WW1 but the firm closed in 1930's. There is no trace of the works , but the street still exists, with houses and a community centre on it. I will be passing the site in a few minutes. Also, in this area the works formerly used by Scott & Hodgson is still occupied, they built large mill engines in the 1000's of horsepower class. A bit further away, in Ashton Under Lyne, is the former National Gas & Oil Engine works, the birthplace of all those narrowboat engines.

I think there is a Wilton engine at the Anson Engine Museum in Poynton.

Bill

I was wrong, Wilton was on Richmond St, Audenshaw not Wilton St. Oddly enough " The National" was on another Richmond St in Ashton

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nice motor didn't even get a bid!! make a nice tug motor :wub: :wub:

Edited by hamsterfan

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Well spotted Richard ! The Glennifers have just been recovered from the engine room of a motor yacht being stripped for conversion to a houseboat. They were installed brand new in 1935 and are a consecutively numbered pair. They really need re-homing to someone who has a genuine long term interest in these lovely engines. Straight forward conversion from air to electric start it seems. Both turn easily and would not take a lot of work to get started at first glance. 200 rpm tickover 900rpm flat out! Lovely smile.png

Edited by steamraiser2

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Now that's plain silly Richard wink.png - what about finding a home for these merely 60hp Gleniffer's though unsure.png

 

DC3_001.jpg

Anyone have any idea what the thing is on the flywheel end that looks like it has radial cylinders?

 

MP.

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Five cylinder air motor to start the engine

Wacky. I thought air-start diesels worked by air injection into the cylinder on power stroke? Maybe that's only the really big ones?

 

MP.

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Nope just a matter of choice on the part of the manufacturer, some like the Lister JP,JS & JK's were air into the cylinder as you mention, in the case of Gleniffers they used both the piston type air starter motor and on some models an air motor that is more recognisable as a starter motor.

Wacky. I thought air-start diesels worked by air injection into the cylinder on power stroke? Maybe that's only the really big ones?

 

MP.

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Nope just a matter of choice on the part of the manufacturer, some like the Lister JP,JS & JK's were air into the cylinder as you mention, in the case of Gleniffers they used both the piston type air starter motor and on some models an air motor that is more recognisable as a starter motor.

 

Presumably a vane type motor, much like modern compressed air tools. Guess that the motor is also the compressor to feed the air tanks?

 

Richard

Edited by RLWP

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Presumably a vane type motor, much like modern compressed air tools. Guess that the motor is also the compressor to feed the air tanks?

 

Richard

 

Not in this case. The bank of air start bottles were charged by a high pressure compressor driven by a four cylinder Perkins diesel. The relief valve on the bottle bank was set at 350 psi. After over forty years of idleness they still had air in them!

Edited by steamraiser2

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