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Good Knee Pads?


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I have a pair of old knee pads that I bought from B & Q. Problem is that they always ride up my legs, (away from the knee), after a few minutes of using them.... no matter how tight I do the straps.

 

Any suggestions for a pair that will stay on the knee after the first few bendings of the knee.

 

Hope that makes sense :)

 

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Some, (maybe quite a lot of?), work trousers have pockets on the knees, designed to have suitable pads inserted in them. (The ones I use have Velcro flaps to close the pockets and ensure the pads stay on the knees.

 

Clearly with this arrangement the pads can't go "walkies".

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24 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

Some, (maybe quite a lot of?), work trousers have pockets on the knees, designed to have suitable pads inserted in them. (The ones I use have Velcro flaps to close the pockets and ensure the pads stay on the knees.

 

Clearly with this arrangement the pads can't go "walkies".

I agree, that overalls or bib and brace with knee pad pockets are much better.

Bib and brace with knee pad pockets is my boating "uniform"

When mooring up,because of my bad back, I find it easier to drop to my knees to tie up rather than bending.

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If there is one group of people who know a bit about knee pads, it is cavers. The most commonly used are made from neoprene, usually with a hard wearing coating on the ground side. Held on with either fixed, or velcro straps. https://starlessriver.com/shop/warmbac-warmtex-knee-pads-plain-strap/

I've used them for years and they mostly stay in place, except under the most extreme contortions through cave passages.

The old NCB miners knee pads are still made too and some cavers use them. https://lestersdirect.co.uk/knee-pads-14-c.asp

Jen

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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30 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

If there is one group of people who know a bit about knee pads, it is cavers. The most commonly used are made from neoprene, usually with a hard wearing coating on the ground side. Held on with either fixed, or velcro straps. https://starlessriver.com/shop/warmbac-warmtex-knee-pads-plain-strap/

I've used them for years and they mostly stay in place, except under the most extreme contortions through cave passages.

The old NCB miners knee pads are still made too and some cavers use them. https://lestersdirect.co.uk/knee-pads-14-c.asp

Jen

 

When I did a bit of Caving, neither I, nor anyone else that I caved with, used knee pads. In fact, I never knew that cavers used knee pads, just strong trousers and a heavy duty boiler suit.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer
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29 minutes ago, David Schweizer said:

 

When I did a bit of Caving, neither I, nor anyone else that I caved with, used knee pads. In fact, I never knew that cavers used knee pads, just strong trousers and a heavy duty boiler suit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, we are a weedy bunch of effete snowflakes now. Nothing like the tough 'uns of yore. Not so many have to give up the activity after getting housemaids knee either though.

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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Years ago road and pavement contractors and council workers made their own knee pads. They'd cut segments out of old car tyers drill holes at the sides for a strap to pass through and buckle them on behind the knee. They used bald slick tyres in dry weather and town and country tyres in the wet, for H & S  reasons.

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4 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Years ago road and pavement contractors and council workers made their own knee pads. They'd cut segments out of old car tyers drill holes at the sides for a strap to pass through and buckle them on behind the knee. They used bald slick tyres in dry weather and town and country tyres in the wet, for H & S  reasons.

Illegal now surely, unless they have a minimum of 1.5mm tread. A £1000 fine per knee.

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11 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Illegal now surely, unless they have a minimum of 1.5mm tread. A £1000 fine per knee.

I expect the bald slick ones are now illegal, I expect they use Michelin X now in the dry. Most had a pair of each. Out in the countryside they tended to use army jeep type track grip tyres. They never got on by using radial tyres when they came out, too wide and tended to slip round to the back of the knees which left them kneeling on the straps.

Edited by bizzard
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2 minutes ago, bizzard said:

I expect the bald slick ones are now illegal, I expect they use Michelin X now in the dry. Most had a pair of each. Out in the countryside they tended to use army jeep type track grip tyres.

Kart tyres for the work experience kid.

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9 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Illegal now surely, unless they have a minimum of 1.5mm tread. A £1000 fine per knee.

 

And no mixing crossply & radial...

 

We're drifting in the direction of the four Yorkshiremen, I like it...

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4 minutes ago, bizzard said:

I expect the bald slick ones are now illegal, I expect they use Michelin X now in the dry. Most had a pair of each. Out in the countryside they tended to use army jeep type track grip tyres.

Nowadays with modern technology they could use something like Michelin CrossClimate tyres, great in all conditions 🙂

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Sometimes a pavement worker would nod off and keel over on the sand base of the pavement to have a nap, he could usually be identified by the foreman as the wording imprinted back to front in the sand left by the name on the tyres wall,, like Dunlop C41, Good Year, Firestone ect.

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8 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Studded ones for ice.

When kneeling on hot tarry roads they'd use sections of old metal gutters.  Contractors men might have worked in the ice but I doubt if council workers ever would.

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They'r most famous excuse to stop work was to declare they'd got a puncture. If a nail the tyre might be nailed to there knee needing surgery to extract and remove it, although the foreman often did this with a pair of pliars.

Edited by bizzard
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8 hours ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

 

Yeah, we are a weedy bunch of effete snowflakes now. Nothing like the tough 'uns of yore. Not so many have to give up the activity after getting housemaids knee either though.

 

Yes so it would seem, I started in the early 1970s and did a bit when I was living in Buxton, sometiomes with Dave Alsop who had a reputation of being a bit "hard", sadly no longer with us.

 

image.png.eb5b56356ac34a21145d73620d066d38.png

 

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer
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11 hours ago, Richard10002 said:

I have a pair of old knee pads that I bought from B & Q. Problem is that they always ride up my legs, (away from the knee), after a few minutes of using them.... no matter how tight I do the straps.

 

Any suggestions for a pair that will stay on the knee after the first few bendings of the knee.

 

Hope that makes sense :)

 

The knees are always the first thing to go... 

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12 hours ago, Mad Harold said:

I agree, that overalls or bib and brace with knee pad pockets are much better.

Bib and brace with knee pad pockets is my boating "uniform"

When mooring up,because of my bad back, I find it easier to drop to my knees to tie up rather than bending.

If using 'nappy pins' have 18" extension 'handles' welded onto them. Cuts out any need to bend down.

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  • 2 months later...
On 02/09/2022 at 11:12, Jen-in-Wellies said:

If there is one group of people who know a bit about knee pads, it is cavers. The most commonly used are made from neoprene, usually with a hard wearing coating on the ground side. Held on with either fixed, or velcro straps. https://starlessriver.com/shop/warmbac-warmtex-knee-pads-plain-strap/

I've used them for years and they mostly stay in place, except under the most extreme contortions through cave passages.

 

 

After a lot of procrastination, I ordered these on Friday and they arrived today. A bit fiddly as I had to take my boots off to get them on, and they took some getting up to my knees over my jeans. However, they have been on for a few hours, a fair bit of walking around, and they have neither ridden up, nor down. So far so good!

 

Haven't tested the padding function yet, but I'll give it a go on the foredeck tomorrow.

 

Thanks Jen!!

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On 02/09/2022 at 12:00, Jen-in-Wellies said:

 

Yeah, we are a weedy bunch of effete snowflakes now. Nothing like the tough 'uns of yore. Not so many have to give up the activity after getting housemaids knee either though.

 Judging by your avatar, you just need to build up some muscle.

 

Morlocks should help. 

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On 02/09/2022 at 09:50, system 4-50 said:

I like my DeWalt kneepads, they are very comfortable unlike my B&Q ones, but they ride down over time at least on bare knees.

Dewlt here too, I cut off the top straps and just use the bottom ones and have minimal ride up on the leg, there comfortable too

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