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Water Hose Length


JoeC

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57 minutes ago, David Mack said:

Don't you open the valve and allow the hose to flush through for a while before putting the hose end into the tank

Was trying to keep post short.

Edited by pearley
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1 hour ago, Machpoint005 said:

When you're in a marina it doesn't really matter how long it takes to fill the tank, does it?

 

 

I only ever fill up when I'm out and about using the boat. Never in a marina.

 

 

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Another obvious approach when using water points which have a pedestrian walkway between boat and tap would be to use aerial circumvention of pedestrians. 

 

One could  prop the hose up at each side to a height of say 8ft. 

 

A better approach overall would be to fit a reducer on the tap and an angled connector so that the water would be discharged in a predicable (subject to weather) upwards trajectory. 

 

One of those old large satellite dishes could be used to collect the water on the boat and drain to the tank. 

 

It might be unreliable but could avoid negative interaction with towpath users so may be viewed as a quite a valuable option. 

 

Edited by magnetman
Edit for the complex bits
  • Happy 1
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4 minutes ago, magnetman said:

 

A better approach overall would be to fit a reducer on the tap and an angled connector so that the water would be discharged in a predicable (subject to weather) upwards trajectory. 

 

One of those old large satellite dishes could be used to collect the water on the boat and drain to the tank. 

 

It might be unreliable but could avoid negative interaction with towpath users so may be viewed as a quite a valuable option. 

 

 

CRT have very helpfully installed a similar sort of device in the water tap at Anderton. 

As the user presses the small lever down and to the right (in order to open the water flow to the hose connector side of the tap), a brief but generous jet of water spurts vertically upwards, and then spreads out like a small fountain and down onto the user. 

 

I had already washed my hair the previous evening in anticipation of a visit from a normal domestic human being, and so I wasnt in immediate need of a cold water splashing, but even more annoying was that after having received the initial dousing when I started the water flow, I promptly forgot about the fountain effect, and the vertical jet gave my head a second soaking when I switched the water off. 

 

Depressing but predictable is that this was after I'd had two of the same refreshing head splashes at the same water tap a week earlier. 

 

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Wasn’t too pleased at Knowle this year when a car drove straight over my hosepipe 😕 

He turned round after a few minutes so I managed to stop him before he did it again 😐 

 

 

The OP maybe lucky to have a hosepipe left on by the previous owner, we did as well as three BW keys and two sets of pipe connectors. 

 

 

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Just buy the longest and cheapest you can find.

After a year of cyclists riding over it and parents ignoring their children jumping up and down on it while they push buggies backwards and forwards over it, you'll be wanting to buy fresh every year anyway.

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1 hour ago, Ewan123 said:

I'd wait until you get the boat before buying things like this - there's a fair chance the seller will leave various bits with the boat :)

 

It is a fair suggestion, but personally I'd never use 'an unknown' hose pipe, even before the 'water regs' came to be enforced and marinas are now not allowed to leave hoses connected to taps for use by anyone, I would only use my own hose. You have no idea what has happened to that hose - end dropped into the cut, used to flush out a toilet cassette etc etc.

 

 

A message from our marina :

 

Industry Best Practice (IBP) Guidance Document For The Marine Industry On The Safe Operation Of Water Facilities In Marinas,  Boatyards, Sailing Centres, Canals And Other Inland Waterways” has been published. The recommendations from this IBP will be adopted by The Marine Group across all our marina and boatyard sites. As a result, all hose pipes will be removed from our pontoons and storage facilities over the coming days.


The IBP has been compiled for several reasons, including:

  • Increasing the safety of drinking water going onto boats (i.e. preventing stagnant hose pipe water going into water tanks)
  • Reducing the amount of water wasted by hose pipes that do not have shut off valves at the ends
  • Preventing marina/river water getting into hose pipes that have been left dangling off the edge of the pontoon

What does this mean for berth holders?

  • The existing taps (which are all drinking water at source) around the marinas will remain in situ
  • All hose pipes will be removed from the pontoons and storage sites over the coming days
  • Recommendations are for boat owners to have the following:
    • An expandable hose for washing down (the ‘crinkly’ looking hoses)
    • A flat hose for filling up water tanks (these allow water to run out after use ensuring no build-up of stagnant water or bacteria)
    • All hoses must have ‘trigger ends’ or shut off valves.  As all our marina taps are drinking water at source, the shut off valves prevent non-drinking water flowing back up the hose if it drops into the marina.
    • Before filling up water tanks, always run the water until its cold

 

 

 

Water industry-best-practice-for-marinewaterfacilities.pdf

 

 

 

If a site operator issues a hose for the filling of the onboard domestic cold water storage tanks, the site operator is responsible for ensuring that the hose is cleaned, maintained and stored correctly to maintain water quality standards. Records should be kept of this.

 

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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9 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

It is a fair suggestion, but personally I'd never use 'an unknown' hose pipe, even before the 'water regs' came to be enforced and marinas are now not allowed to leave hoses connected to taps for use by anyone, I would only use my own hose. You have no idea what has happened to that hose - end dropped into the cut, used to flush out a toilet cassette etc etc.

 

 

Industry Best Practice (IBP) Guidance Document For The Marine Industry On The Safe Operation Of Water Facilities In Marinas,  Boatyards, Sailing Centres, Canals And Other Inland Waterways” has been published. The recommendations from this IBP will be adopted by The Marine Group across all our marina and boatyard sites. As a result, all hose pipes will be removed from our pontoons and storage facilities over the coming days.


The IBP has been compiled for several reasons, including:

  • Increasing the safety of drinking water going onto boats (i.e. preventing stagnant hose pipe water going into water tanks)
  • Reducing the amount of water wasted by hose pipes that do not have shut off valves at the ends
  • Preventing marina/river water getting into hose pipes that have been left dangling off the edge of the pontoon

What does this mean for berth holders?

  • The existing taps (which are all drinking water at source) around the marinas will remain in situ
  • All hose pipes will be removed from the pontoons and storage sites over the coming days
  • Recommendations are for boat owners to have the following:
    • An expandable hose for washing down (the ‘crinkly’ looking hoses)
    • A flat hose for filling up water tanks (these allow water to run out after use ensuring no build-up of stagnant water or bacteria)
    • All hoses must have ‘trigger ends’ or shut off valves.  As all our marina taps are drinking water at source, the shut off valves prevent non-drinking water flowing back up the hose if it drops into the marina.
    • Before filling up water tanks, always run the water until its cold

Yes that's quite understandable, fair point.

 

We also stumbled upon (quite literally) a long reeled hose on an allotment that we took on recently. It was almost certainly sat around for at least a year so that will get a good flush before use. I do like a bit of an immune system tester every now and then though ;) don't want the body getting complacent now.

Edited by Ewan123
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We were at Castlefield recently and I was surprised to see that long hoses were firmly attached to both sides of the water point  and the ends were just lying on the ground. No way would we have used either! That was the waterpoint just before what is now the visitor moorings

 

haggis

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I passed a boat today taking water. The water point was by his stern and the filler at the bows. He had a long layflat hose and it was laid out on the towpath in quite tight 3 foot flakes. It must have been about 200 foot long 

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13 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

It is a fair suggestion, but personally I'd never use 'an unknown' hose pipe, even before the 'water regs' came to be enforced and marinas are now not allowed to leave hoses connected to taps for use by anyone, I would only use my own hose. You have no idea what has happened to that hose - end dropped into the cut, used to flush out a toilet cassette etc etc.

 

 

Don’t agree Alan, by that logic the hose needs changing every time a hire boat goes out. 🤣🤣

 

The chances of picking bugs up are very small indeed compared to the environmental cost of changing hosepipes. I’ve used the one left by the previous owner with no issues at all. I doubt I will ever change it. I always fire some water out before putting into the tank mainly  to check the speed of flow but anything unwanted would be flushed out too.
 

You are far more likely to get ill from undercooked food. 
 


 

 

 

  • Greenie 1
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3 minutes ago, Stroudwater1 said:

Don’t agree Alan, by that logic the hose needs changing every time a hire boat goes out.

 

I said "I would never use an unknown hose" if you are similarly concerned about previous users habits, and hire a boat, take your own hose.

I use my own boats so don't need to worry about anyone else dropping the end in the water. If I drop the end in, the hose gets 'dropped down the line' and relegated to a 'boat washing hose' and has its own 'dirty locker' with brushes and buckets, nappy pins, stakes, lump hammer etc etc. Clean, potable, water hoses live in the clean-locker.

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Reminds me of the last time we were on the service pontoon at Dunchurch, had to stop a lovely first-time-boating couple from filling the water tank on their shareboat with the water hose at the pumpout station 🤢

Don’t think they quite grasped the problem but did listen.

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19 hours ago, Stroudwater1 said:

Don’t agree Alan, by that logic the hose needs changing every time a hire boat goes out. 🤣🤣

 

The chances of picking bugs up are very small indeed compared to the environmental cost of changing hosepipes. I’ve used the one left by the previous owner with no issues at all. I doubt I will ever change it. I always fire some water out before putting into the tank mainly  to check the speed of flow but anything unwanted would be flushed out too.
 

You are far more likely to get ill from undercooked food. 
 


 

 

 

I have watched hire boats on change over day when the hose is used to fill a tank, dropped in the cut and dragged out on the next boat all the way down the line. Hire boats with a length of lose in the front well deck getting walked over and stood on.

10 hours ago, Hudds Lad said:

Reminds me of the last time we were on the service pontoon at Dunchurch, had to stop a lovely first-time-boating couple from filling the water tank on their shareboat with the water hose at the pumpout station 🤢

Don’t think they quite grasped the problem but did listen.

I had a conversation about that very point last week at a service point

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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

I have watched hire boats on change over day when the hose is used to fill a tank, dropped in the cut and dragged out on the next boat all the way down the line. Hire boats with a length of lose in the front well deck getting walked over and stood on.

I had a conversation about that very point last week at a service point

Similar situation at Braunston this year. Guy with the regulation captains cap,on a hire boat just about to put the water hose into the pump out tank on the boat until I mentioned it might be a better idea to try the front of the boat first🤣🤣🤣

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