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these batterys any good?


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I tend to shy away from items with 'flamboyant' names such as , for example, X Pro,  Wizz, Super, etc etc. Always strikes me as tacky marketing. Having said that I have absolutely no knowledge of this product but I'll lay bets on them being badged chinese.     

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18 minutes ago, crosser said:

need to replace my 4 batterys and found these..  anyone know if there any good? thanks

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/393336118283

 

Thise are sealed batteries, you would be better with ones that can be 'topped up'.

You can destroy expensive 'quality' batteries as easily as 'cheapo' batteries, in a little as a month.

 

I'd suggets that you buy the cheapest you can find, find out how to manage them and make them last a couple of years. batteries are disposable items.

If you do kill them, better to kill £60 batteries than £150 batteries.

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thanks all...    might just go for the probat ones at £63 and see how they go , if i get a couple of years out of them then maybe look at a better setup...

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33 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Thise are sealed batteries, you would be better with ones that can be 'topped up'.

 

 

All other things being equal then I agree, you'll get better performance from FLA batteries than sealed. 

 

However, that's dependent on being willing and able to top them up properly every few months. I wrecked a set of expensive Trojans by topping them up with a cheap unknown brand of deionised water which I suspect was just water.

 

The other thing is to check what maximum voltage(s) your charging system is putting out. 14.4v for sealed and 14.8v for FLAs. If you get that wrong you'll either be undercharging or overcharging your batteries which won't do much for their longevity.

Edited by blackrose
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1 minute ago, crosser said:

my boat is a 24v system , not sure if that makes a difference... 

 

Yes it will but I think you can just double the max voltage figures I've given. If that's wrong someone will correct me I'm sure.

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8 minutes ago, crosser said:

my boat is a 24v system , not sure if that makes a difference... 

One thing you could do when you go for better batteries it 4 X T105 in series to give you 24 volts, as they are 6 volt cells

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34 minutes ago, blackrose said:

 

>>   topping them up with a cheap unknown brand of deionised water which I suspect was just water. <<

 

 

It was years before I realised you could actually buy deionised (ie distilled) water. My father never bought any until he retired.

 

He was a chemistry teacher, and made his own.

 

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23 minutes ago, crosser said:

my boat is a 24v system , not sure if that makes a difference... 

No it doesn't - of itself 24v means you can economise on cable sizes and -mebe- get  devices whihc are more suitable  for the sort of duty demanded by narrowboating.

The bottom line as always is not to overstress the elements of the system - that is:-

  • Power strage capacity
  • Generating capabilities / costs / suitability
  • device suitability

I am constantly amazed  how folk expect to power a small housing estate powered by 2 x AA cell batteries...

(OK - OK an overstatement perhaps but scaling it back to reality you may begin to understand the potential challenges tha havr to br adressed!

It doesn't mean that you cant, more getting the righ mix of resources, both in the generation end of the equaqtion and the consumption.

 

It can be done....

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My batteries are on their last legs, but:

 

(1) They are 8 years old;

(2) We don't have a huge energy demand as leisure boaters, and

(3) The batteries are sealed-for-life type. It's not impossible, but it is very difficult, to get at my batteries to top them up unless you have two double-jointed elbows on each arm. I don't.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 26/05/2021 at 19:52, Machpoint005 said:

actually buy deionised (ie distilled) water.

 

Just for clarity, deionised water is not the same thing as distilled water.

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12 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

You can also use the water from your dehumidifier, you can save a 'fortune'. Simply keep a few 2 litre 'pop-bottles' full and you are fine for years of battery top ups.

A lot of people talk about contamination from the evaporator plates (have I got the right one? Condenser plate) but I wonder how bit a problem that actually is.

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55 minutes ago, Col_T said:

 

Just for clarity, deionised water is not the same thing as distilled water.

 

48 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

You can also use the water from your dehumidifier, you can save a 'fortune'. Simply keep a few 2 litre 'pop-bottles' full and you are fine for years of battery top ups.

I’m with Col. Water from a dehumidifier is effectively distilled, and contains contaminants that were in the air (particles of smoke, dust, human skin cells etc etc). By the same token if you brew up some sugar and yeast to make beer-strength alcohol, and then distill it once, you don’t get 100% alcohol or anything near. So distilled water might be better than tap water, but not much. Deionised water is dirt cheap so why not just use it?

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Well the description on E bay sounds like a load of waffle but big heavy ones tend to have a lot more chemistry in them than dimensionally smaller and cheaper lighter ones. These look like the 'Hankook' ones I am using at the moment. I am not expecting a long life from them so I won't be disappointed when they give up. I think of them like car tyres these days, a couple of years or so and they are getting a bit weary, time for another couple of budget tyres or batteries.

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29 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

 

I’m with Col. Water from a dehumidifier is effectively distilled, and contains contaminants that were in the air (particles of smoke, dust, human skin cells etc etc). By the same token if you brew up some sugar and yeast to make beer-strength alcohol, and then distill it once, you don’t get 100% alcohol or anything near. So distilled water might be better than tap water, but not much. Deionised water is dirt cheap so why not just use it?

But what is in deionised water? serious question as I have never seen an analysis of home distilled or deionised water.

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13 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

But what is in deionised water? serious question as I have never seen an analysis of home distilled or deionised water.

 

Mr Google comes up trumps :

 

 

Deionized Water vs. Distilled Water

When it comes to distilled water vs. deionized water, both are very pure. In each case, however, the purity of the water before it goes through the water treatment makes a difference. The deionization process, for example, only removes ions – charged non-organic particles – from the water. The water should be filtered first to remove organic material, and additional filtering with a reverse osmosis (RO) system will remove a significant number of additional contaminants. This leaves only a small amount of ionized minerals for the DI system to remove.

Water distillation, on the other hand, can remove more impurities than just ions. This process removes nearly all minerals, many chemicals, and most bacteria. That doesn't mean that it removes everything, however, especially if the water contains volatile organics and certain other contaminants. These impurities will evaporate and stay in the distilled water. As with deionized water, pre-treatment filtering is an important step.

Deionized Water vs. Distilled - Uses

Since both treatment methods produce high purity water, choosing between deionized water vs. distilled water often depends on how you're using it. Distilled water is often more pure, especially if it's been filtered first, and it should not contain any bacteria or other pathogens which could, in theory, be left in DI water. Distilled water, especially if it's been double or triple distilled, can be used for nearly all laboratory applications, including those in which DI water might not be pure enough.  

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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40 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

But what is in deionised water? serious question as I have never seen an analysis of home distilled or deionised water.

It is more a case of what isn't in de-ionised water. In a previous existence I sold, amongst other things, solenoid valves. I recall that valves used on de-ionised water had to be stainless. The common brass valves were no good as the water would leech elements out of the brass.

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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

But what is in deionised water? serious question as I have never seen an analysis of home distilled or deionised water.

It’s water from which ions (other than hydroxyl ions) have been removed by chemical process. I suppose it may or may not be more organically pure than distilled, but the point is that it is the ions of eg calcium that are bad for a battery. A little bit of mushed up organic matter doesn’t really matter much.

After each day’s flying we had to “wash” the (gas turbine) engine compressor blades, by spraying water into the inlets with the engines at idle. Mostly to get the salt off. We had to use deionised water, not distilled water, as the latter contained too many ionised impurities that would leave deposits on the blades.

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22 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

 

After each day’s flying we had to “wash” the (gas turbine) engine compressor blades, by spraying water into the inlets with the engines at idle. Mostly to get the salt off. We had to use deionised water, not distilled water, as the latter contained too many ionised impurities that would leave deposits on the blades.

We just used Tap water on our compressor engines RB211 and Avons

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5 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

We just used Tap water on our compressor engines RB211 and Avons

I guess your turbines were not running at any sort of time limited contingency rating and thus the torque/temperature relationship was less critical. As were helicopter engines nearly all the time, but we had to cater for the engine failure situation where the remaining engine had to be able to wind up to its 30 second and 2 minute contingency ratings without melting!

Edited by nicknorman
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