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How much pitting is okay? Merged with Boat Survey


Lisahall24

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Most earlier boats, (Harborough Marine, Fernie, Springers etc)were built out of 5mm steel, ans it was good steel,  they are probably 40 plus years old now, so 1mm loss isnt much.

However, you may find that some insurers do not like boats with less than 4mm steel for fully comprehensive cover, so you might have to shop around or put the case forward that 1mm in 40 years isnt bad going.

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11 minutes ago, Lisahall24 said:

Boat survey is showing hull sides fabricated to 5.0mm and pitting is present up to 1.0mm is this okay? 

 

To answer the question - "Not OK"

 

Whilst it will not 'leak' until it gets to 0.0mm Insurers are increasingly difficult to find who will give you 'fully comp' insurance on 4mm thickness.

If you are happy with 3rd party only, then go that way. 

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Hi, I’m wondering if there is anybody who is willing to have a look at a boat survey and advise if I’m paying a good price.  I can see that some work is required but I’m not sure about costs etc.  

 

Edited by Lisahall24
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17 minutes ago, Lisahall24 said:

The boat is 1996 David Clark.  So will this need replateing? If so, any idea of approximate costs?  It’s a 50ft boat. 

It depends if it just one side, 2 sides, bottom or all 3.

 

Somewhere between £5,000 and £10,000 but its like a 'piece of string'

 

Thats a big loss on a boat of that age.

 

Have you had the boat for some time ?

Have you identified the reason for the pitting ?

 

A member here lost 6mm off his boat in 18 months seemingly down to stray electrical leakage in a marina.

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6 minutes ago, Lisahall24 said:

Hi, I’m wondering if there is anybody who is willing to have a look at a boat survey and advise if I’m paying a good price.  I can see that some work is required but I’m not sure about costs etc.  

 

How long ago was the survey undertaken ?

Who did the survey, and whose requested it ? (if it was the seller then it cannot be trusted or used as a basis for buying the boat)

If it is any more than a few days ago then it is invalid.

Did the surveyor not give you a valuation and an estimate of costs of things that need doing ?

 

Post more information - post the survey here and you'll get all the advice you need.

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10 minutes ago, Lisahall24 said:

Hi, I’m wondering if there is anybody who is willing to have a look at a boat survey and advise if I’m paying a good price.  I can see that some work is required but I’m not sure about costs etc.  

Foto it and post on here and we will cut out the crap for you.

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2 minutes ago, Lisahall24 said:

I haven’t bought the boat yet, I’m a first time buyer so not really sure what’s what so looking for advice.  

Its a broad brush statement but don't buy a boat under £35,000, as a newbie, you don't know what to look for, and that wonderful bargain at £15,000, that needs £20,000 spending on it will give you nothing buy heartache and problems.

Buying a boat that needs no work will mean it is a pleasure to own and you can concentrate on 'run of the mill' maintenance.

 

Maybe explain what you are looking for :

 

Budget ?

What use  (Residential, leisure, weekend, holidays) ?

Where will it be used ?

Will you have a mooring (where) or continuously cruise ?

What size boat do you think you need ?

Single handed or do you have a partner ?

Previous experience (hire boater) ?

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The boat I’ve seen looks perfect for me (alone) in terms of size (50ft) and living space.  It’s had a recent fit out that looks professionally done.   I have the opportunity to work from any location for the next 6 months so the plan is to constantly cruise for 6 months with a view to find moorings (midlands area) to live aboard from then on.  I have no previous experience other than a day hire.  The asking price is £33k. 
 

https://narrowboats.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/david-clarke-50-cruiser-stern/652382

 

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Not a lot of info to go on, but assuming everything is "good", and with the overplating work done is a £33-£35 boat.

 

Without knowing how extensive the pitting is I'd say it, is overpriced.

When was the survey dated ?

 

HOWEVER, there is such demand for anything that floats, boats are even getting bought 'over the phone' without being viewed.

 

I would still suggest that you try and find a boat that doesn't need major work.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Not a lot of info to go on, but assuming everything is "good", and with the overplating work done is a £33-£35 boat.

 

Without knowing how extensive the pitting is I'd say it, is overpriced.

When was the survey dated ?

 

HOWEVER, there is such demand for anything that floats, boats are even getting bought 'over the phone' without being viewed.

 

I would still suggest that you try and find a boat that doesn't need major work.

 

 

Did you commission the survey,or was it the owner? If it was the owner read it with a pinch of salt.

If the pitting is only in a small area,it can be repaired by spot welding.Much cheaper than overplating,but you will need the surveyor's advice about this.

You may be able to negotiate a price reduction to cover the cost of work required if spot welding is feasible.

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5 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

Did you commission the survey,or was it the owner? If it was the owner read it with a pinch of salt.

If the pitting is only in a small area,it can be repaired by spot welding.Much cheaper than overplating,but you will need the surveyor's advice about this.

You may be able to negotiate a price reduction to cover the cost of work required if spot welding is feasible.

 

The OP has two parallel threads going - I made the same point in the other thread.

 

Boat Survey - New to Boating? - Canal World

 

How long ago was the survey undertaken ?

Who did the survey, and whose requested it ? (if it was the seller then it cannot be trusted or used as a basis for buying the boat)

If it is any more than a few days ago then it is invalid.

Did the surveyor not give you a valuation and an estimate of costs of things that need doing ?

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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My surveyor actually drilled out unobtrusive holes in the lining to check the inside of the hull, leaving me the plugs to replace. The 'self fitout' often rings alarm bells with insurers.

£33K seems expensive when you consider many Dave Clark boats only had 6mm bottoms. Also the BMC 1.5 not the best of engines these days and I would have thought this was not fitted by the builder, so would query it's ancestry. 

Edited by Ex Brummie
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Nothing in that survey says it would be uninsurable fully comp, however, if the survey is several years old, things may have got worse since then. 

It also doesnt read as needing complete overplating.

One of the worst areas for corrosion could be under the rubbing strakes, never dries out completely so the rust just eats away.

 

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Did you comission the survey, in which case ask him about these things.

If it needs overplating, walk away.

If survey not comissioned by you, it means very little, get a better survey if you intend to buy, it's very wooley, the survey, I mean.

Have you inspected the boat, do you like it?

How does the engine run?

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1mm pits in a bit of steel that's been in the water for the best part of a quarter of a century? I'd say that's pretty good and better than most of us can hope for.  Keeping it in a good state (if you were to buy it) would become an ongoing job. Give it a good epoxy paint job, paint every inch of the underwater steel, lift out, attend to scrapes and paint loss every 3 years or so and the hull will last for years. Thing is that surveys can be an opinion and not a laboratory definitive report, there will be places where a few stray pits might be a bit deeper, there will also be bits of better than average steel, there will be places beneath the floorboards where water lodges and stuff like that.  Best thing is an informal chat with your surveyor.

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13 minutes ago, Onewheeler said:

What Bee said. 1mm is nothing. I'd have it shot basted and epoxied instead of normal blacking. Budget a bit over £2k for that and anodes (others may have a better cost estimate).

You are correct no one has said 1mm 'is a lot'

1mm is nothing on a 12mm base plate, its not a lot on an 8mm base plate, but on a 5mm plate it takes it below the level that many insurers will offer cover.

 

If it can be recovered by filling in all the pits it can be insured, but, it it still a 'bottom of the range' boat with a 5mm base. For £33k + all the work needed she can buy a boat needing much less work.

Will need to act quickly and go and view the day it is advertised, no use waiting 'until the weekend' as if it is any good it will be sold within 24 hours.

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  • magpie patrick changed the title to How much pitting is okay? Merged with Boat Survey

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