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Sir Percy

Sleeping arrangements - along the way, or across the way?

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Most berths are arranged along the length of the boat, aren't they? Have you ever slept on a bed athwartships, and did it make any difference?

If the boat were rocked, I'd imagine that head-to-foot rocking might be a little less pleasant than side-to-side, but I've been on train couchettes without noticing anything.

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Our first boat had a double bed crosswise in the back cabin. At first it seemed like a good idea but we grew to hate it because it blocked the way through so every morning it had to be put away and then every night it had to be reassembled and remade.

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Just now, Keeping Up said:

Our first boat had a double bed crosswise in the back cabin. At first it seemed like a good idea but we grew to hate it because it blocked the way through so every morning it had to be put away and then every night it had to be reassembled and remade.

Thinking about end of cabin to make the most of the space, and permanent installation. Did it make any difference to how you slept?

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10 minutes ago, Sir Percy said:

Most berths are arranged along the length of the boat, aren't they? Have you ever slept on a bed athwartships, and did it make any difference?

If the boat were rocked, I'd imagine that head-to-foot rocking might be a little less pleasant than side-to-side, but I've been on train couchettes without noticing anything.

Oooh, almost as much a bone of contention as cassette v pump-out toilets!

We have a cross-bed. It is very comfortable. But I am five feet ten and a bit, my wife is a little less tall. If you're about six feet tall or over, you probably won't be able to stretch out fully on a cross-bed with out going a bit diagonal.

   They're a good space-saver, occupying only 4'6" of the boat's length as opposed to 6'3" or so. Also, they can be full double-bed width (most longitudinal "double" beds are only four feet wide).

 

   The case for the opposition will be along shortly, I'm sure.

Edited by Athy

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5 minutes ago, Athy said:

Oooh, almost as much a bone of contention as cassette v pump-out toilets!

 

Also, they can be full double-bed width

I thought I'd be stirring up a short*rses bed, not a hornet's nest

 

Good point

Edited by Sir Percy

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31 minutes ago, Sir Percy said:

I thought I'd be stirring up a short*rses bed, not a hornet's nest

 

Good point

No hornets yet, fingers crossed.

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45 minutes ago, Sir Percy said:

Thinking about end of cabin to make the most of the space, and permanent installation. Did it make any difference to how you slept?

No the only thing I've ever found to make a difference is that I can't sleep with my head lower than my feet, so with a longitudinal bed I have to sleep with my head towards the bow

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6 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

No the only thing I've ever found to make a difference is that I can't sleep with my head lower than my feet, so with a longitudinal bed I have to sleep with my head towards the bow

If sleeping feet forward is important to you  that is easily cured by building the bed base in so that at maximum bow up trim (empty water, full diesel?)  the base slopes down to the front a little.

 

N

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3 minutes ago, BEngo said:

If sleeping feet forward is important to you  that is easily cured by building the bed base in so that at maximum bow up trim (empty water, full diesel?)  the base slopes down to the front a little.

 

N

I've done this. (Recently).  And I'm 1400mm wide by 2000mm long, big enough to get lost in.

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9 minutes ago, system 4-50 said:

I'm 1400mm wide by 2000mm long

Built like a brick outhouse then!  4'7" across the shoulders and 6'7" tall ... I'm going to suggest a cross bed won't be great for you!

 

 

  • Haha 3

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cross beds are standard in a working narrowboat cabin - there weren't many tall boatmen I can think of though. The table cupboard and range are on the port (chimney) side so all other things being equal you do sleep with your head higher than your feet.

 

Tam

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If fitted cross by the bow remember you need access for emergency escape and working river locks which require you to use a bow and stern line.

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We have a crossbed to make a 6ft X 5ft bed. I suffer badly from reflux so had the head end made 3 inches higher than feet.

 

Although we've had if for over 12 years and it takes less than a minute to make up, it does pall a bit now.

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It's a narrowboat,  is it?  I ask cos if you're at sea in anything that rolls like a bar steward, you probabl won't enjoy the alternating feet up - head up experience!

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Many, many   years ago we hired from the original Mr.Grumpy at Napton NBs, a great boat made by one P.Nichols - with a cross bed.

We had a guest couple, the gentleman of which  was 6 foot something and of rugby scrum proportions - hence we allocated the double to them. It was a bit chill (temperature wise) and he commented that his feet were cold in the morning... It transpire that the double had a radiator at one end - his end, beng summer the heatinfg was not on. Put me off cross beds... (Methinks P.N didn't do the fitout).

Made I larf in retrospect.

Thus on my boat, I made the forward double at leat 4'6" wide by 6+ ft longlots of room in both directions. 

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2 hours ago, Detling said:

If fitted cross by the bow remember you need access for emergency escape and working river locks which require you to use a bow and stern line.

Good point, there's hatches at front and both sides. 

2 hours ago, pearley said:

We have a crossbed to make a 6ft X 5ft bed. I suffer badly from reflux so had the head end made 3 inches higher than feet.

 

Although we've had if for over 12 years and it takes less than a minute to make up, it does pall a bit now.

Occasional GORD; hadn't thought about that, will have to be able to jack up the bed frame. Thanks.

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28 minutes ago, Sir Percy said:

Good point, there's hatches at front and both sides. 

Occasional GORD; hadn't thought about that, will have to be able to jack up the bed frame. Thanks.

Gaviscom to the rescue!

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1 minute ago, Sir Percy said:

If only! Omeprazole prescribed.

Was on that for a few year now Lansoprazole for 20 years ot more plus large bottle Gaviscom a month.

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Just now, pearley said:

Was on that for a few year now Lansoprazole for 20 years ot more plus large bottle Gaviscom a month.

Jesus. Maybe I'd be better off forgetting about the bed, and sleeping upright.

  • Haha 1

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Cross beds are the thing of the devil. Only any use if you buy part of a boat. If you buy a decent size then they are as much use as a chocolate fireguard. E ven on tiny 57 footers that I have owned I didnt have a crossbed, life is too short for all that mularky.

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There's no way I'd want to disassemble then reassemble my bed every day. That'd definitely be the deal breaker.

  • Greenie 1

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4 hours ago, Ange said:

There's no way I'd want to disassemble then reassemble my bed every day. That'd definitely be the deal breaker.

Why would you need to. Our mattress does "break" two thirds/ one third, but in practice we just scramble across the bed to get to the back end. WE put a plastic sheet across it during the day. It really isn't a problem.

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13 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

It's a narrowboat,  is it?  I ask cos if you're at sea in anything that rolls like a bar steward, you probabl won't enjoy the alternating feet up - head up experience!

After a 5 hour stint on the helm crossing the Channel from Alderney to The Needles in a force 5 gusting 6, with the rest of the crew ill, "you" will sleep on anything! :)

Edited by Ray T

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1 minute ago, Ray T said:

After a 5 hour stint on the helm crossing the Channel from Alderney to The Needles in a force 5 gusting 6, with the rest of the crew ill, "you" will sleep on anything! :)

Yes, I'd tend to agree (although by then it sounds likely you'll be around for going  alongside in Lymington or similar, after which you're moored up). If you're still in a a force 5 gusting 6 though, and still rolling like a good un, an athwartships berth won't make it easier! In a yacht, all bets is orf. :)

 

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