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Justin Smith

How are you supposed to come in to moor ?

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On 03/06/2019 at 19:05, Chris Williams said:

I honestly can't remember how I did it.  Perhaps being a Josher it just stayed wherever I put it.  

All very well using the current on a river, but if your boat is longer than the river is wide, it becomes much more interesting when going downstream.  Somehow you have to get the stern into the bank while frantically going astern.  Strong ropes help if there is anything to get them onto.

The trick when travelling down stream is to point the bow away from the bank as you approach and thereby bringing the stern towards the bank, apply reverse bringing the stern against the bank, step off nonchalantly with stern line in hand along with hammer and mooring pin with boat ticking over in reverse, fix mooring pin and take a turn around it and return the end of the line back to the boat and tie off. By this time the current will have brought the bow to the bank and you will be able to casually walk to that end and tie off in the same manner.

 

Keith 

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25 minutes ago, Steilsteven said:

The trick when travelling down stream is to point the bow away from the bank as you approach and thereby bringing the stern towards the bank, apply reverse bringing the stern against the bank, step off nonchalantly with stern line in hand along with hammer and mooring pin with boat ticking over in reverse, fix mooring pin and take a turn around it and return the end of the line back to the boat and tie off. By this time the current will have brought the bow to the bank and you will be able to casually walk to that end and tie off in the same manner.

 

Keith 

Try that at Abingdon in a strong flood stream.  You will need more than tick-over in astern.  Of course, you should not be navigating in those conditions, but working boats have to earn their keep.

I saw a tug and barges coming downstream at Osney, in a very strong stream.  The tugmaster put her into astern, wound her up, and the whole lot just stopped.  A bit more horse-power than I had.

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1 hour ago, Steilsteven said:

The trick when travelling down stream is to point the bow away from the bank as you approach and thereby bringing the stern towards the bank, apply reverse bringing the stern against the bank, step off nonchalantly with stern line in hand along with hammer and mooring pin with boat ticking over in reverse, fix mooring pin and take a turn around it and return the end of the line back to the boat and tie off. By this time the current will have brought the bow to the bank and you will be able to casually walk to that end and tie off in the same manner.

 

Keith 

Ferry gliding in reverse but don't drop the stern line in the water while hammering the pin - it will be round the propeller and rudder quicker than a rat up a drain pipe!

 

Howard

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1 hour ago, Steilsteven said:

The trick when travelling down stream is to point the bow away from the bank as you approach and thereby bringing the stern towards the bank, apply reverse bringing the stern against the bank, step off nonchalantly with stern line in hand along with hammer and mooring pin with boat ticking over in reverse, fix mooring pin and take a turn around it and return the end of the line back to the boat and tie off. By this time the current will have brought the bow to the bank and you will be able to casually walk to that end and tie off in the same manner.

 

Keith 

From my own experience...I would never attempt to get off the stern and leave the prop spinning. When I did my PBL2 with stern drive..this was an accepted practice..but having fallen off twice over the years I wouldn't do that. No criticism.. personal preference.

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23 hours ago, Chris Williams said:

Try that at Abingdon in a strong flood stream.  You will need more than tick-over in astern.  Of course, you should not be navigating in those conditions, but working boats have to earn their keep.

I saw a tug and barges coming downstream at Osney, in a very strong stream.  The tugmaster put her into astern, wound her up, and the whole lot just stopped.  A bit more horse-power than I had.

Well at Abingdon there is enough room to turn and face upstream which is what you should do if possible.

Keith

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22 hours ago, Bobbybass said:

From my own experience...I would never attempt to get off the stern and leave the prop spinning. When I did my PBL2 with stern drive..this was an accepted practice..but having fallen off twice over the years I wouldn't do that. No criticism.. personal preference.

Well if it's a gentle stream it might be possible to select neutral just before stepping off but it means that your actions have to be much quicker in fixing the mooring pin before the boat gets carried away by the stream. I'm talking single handed here and should only be done if one is confident of their actions of course. There are always risks and the riskiest ways of of bringing a boat into the bank when travelling downstream to my mind, are bringing the bow in first to drop off crew with the bow line or getting off with just a centre line. The first scenario usually results in the boat stuck across the river and the second has the danger of the boat pulling you into the water because you are trying to control it from the worst possible place.

 

Keith

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We have our own special technique.

 

I come in slowly at an angle and swing the stern in, give a burst of reverse, and the missus jumps off at the stern holding the centre line. Then the boat starts drifting out either at the bow or at the stern, or sometimes both. My wife tugs ineffectually on the rope for ten or twenty seconds before asking me if there's anything I can do from my position on the back deck a few feet out into the cut. Then I go forwards a bit, back a bit, forwards a bit, back a bit, while she walks up and down alongside, until the stern comes in again. Then I step off, take the centre line, and pull the boat in from wherever it's ended up this time.

 

Never fails.

  • Greenie 1
  • Haha 1

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51 minutes ago, Steilsteven said:

Well at Abingdon there is enough room to turn and face upstream which is what you should do if possible.

Keith

You could well end up going broadside at several knots until you get stemmed up on something.  Not a pleasant experience - I have been there.  I need 75 foot minimum to turn round and no shoals.  3 foot 6  under the boat, loaded.

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8 minutes ago, Chris Williams said:

You could well end up going broadside at several knots until you get stemmed up on something.  Not a pleasant experience - I have been there.  I need 75 foot minimum to turn round and no shoals.  3 foot 6  under the boat, loaded.

So have I,with a loaded pair on ''red boards'', turning mid steam was the only way to come alongside a moored boat to make their delivery.

You will go broadside for a while but it's just a matter of picking your spot and holding your nerve. 

 

Keith

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33 minutes ago, Steilsteven said:

So have I,with a loaded pair on ''red boards'', turning mid steam was the only way to come alongside a moored boat to make their delivery.

You will go broadside for a while but it's just a matter of picking your spot and holding your nerve. 

 

Keith

I noticed a lot of people forget to wind on some extra power to make the turn, although we're only a short 45 footer we surprised a cruiser owner on the thames at abingdon with how quickly we span the boat round.

we had just trickled past him on tickover, given a wriggle to get a bit of momentum turning and then wound the power on to spin quickly and face the flow before dropping power and sliding sideways perfectly in a mooring spot that was about 18 inches longer then the boat. he commented that he had no idea narrowboats could turn like that and that we had turned in less space than he would need.

from my point of view it was one of those times when knowing your boat and a little bit of gut instinct worked out perfectly.

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1 hour ago, Steilsteven said:

So have I,with a loaded pair on ''red boards'', turning mid steam was the only way to come alongside a moored boat to make their delivery.

You will go broadside for a while but it's just a matter of picking your spot and holding your nerve. 

 

Keith

I usually enjoyed having the Red Boards out - a bit more challenging, and no other boats around.  Came through Reading on the Kennet, downstream in a flood, the boat was facing upstream and I found that I had full control by having the engine in ahead, on tick-over. Any problem, just wind her up a bit and you stop.  Came out of Kennet Mouth going backwards.  Then had to turn to go downstream on the Thames.  Interesting.    Canals ? - boring.

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5 hours ago, Steilsteven said:

Well at Abingdon there is enough room to turn and face upstream which is what you should do if possible.

Keith

 

Well as a solo narrow boater I find it a whole load easier and less risky to moor going downstream. In fact I'm even tempted to turn to face downstream sometimes to moor when going up.

 

Engage astern and ferry-glide into the bank. Step off with the stern line and secure to ring or bollard. If you do it going upstream there is a risk the current will catch the bow and it will swing out into the stream unless I run a 70ft line from bow all the way to stern to step off with. And then I have to walk 70ft to the bow to secure it first, instead of the stern which is right where I step off. 

 

 

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Best tips......... don't come into or glide into the bank at too shallow an angle.... the canal is often very shallow just before the lock landing this will throw you all over the place but the nearside!.

 

Don't use too much reverse for too long for the reasons quoted above (bulge of water).

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Well as a solo narrow boater I find it a whole load easier and less risky to moor going downstream. In fact I'm even tempted to turn to face downstream sometimes to moor when going up.

 

Engage astern and ferry-glide into the bank. Step off with the stern line and secure to ring or bollard. If you do it going upstream there is a risk the current will catch the bow and it will swing out into the stream unless I run a 70ft line from bow all the way to stern to step off with. And then I have to walk 70ft to the bow to secure it first, instead of the stern which is right where I step off. 

 

 

I see your point.  Maybe I never had to single-hand upstream, except in lock-cuts.  The missus was usually up the sharp end. 

Memory going.

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14 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Well as a solo narrow boater I find it a whole load easier and less risky to moor going downstream. In fact I'm even tempted to turn to face downstream sometimes to moor when going up.

 

Engage astern and ferry-glide into the bank. Step off with the stern line and secure to ring or bollard. If you do it going upstream there is a risk the current will catch the bow and it will swing out into the stream unless I run a 70ft line from bow all the way to stern to step off with. And then I have to walk 70ft to the bow to secure it first, instead of the stern which is right where I step off. 

 

 

Which is pretty much as I described earlier.

 

Keith 

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19 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Well as a solo narrow boater I find it a whole load easier and less risky to moor going downstream. In fact I'm even tempted to turn to face downstream sometimes to moor when going up.

 

Engage astern and ferry-glide into the bank. Step off with the stern line and secure to ring or bollard. If you do it going upstream there is a risk the current will catch the bow and it will swing out into the stream unless I run a 70ft line from bow all the way to stern to step off with. And then I have to walk 70ft to the bow to secure it first, instead of the stern which is right where I step off. 

 

 

 

When we`ve hired on the Broads, where there is a current, I find it much easier to moor. You want to be moving against the current then you can literally come in parallel, more or less. But the main point is you can still steer and manoeuvre the boat whilst it`s stationary relative to the bank. I find it much harder in a canal where there`s no current because if you need to stay in the same position, relative to the bank, then by definition you have no gear which equals no steer

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