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Russian Ship Lands on Cornish Coast


Alan de Enfield
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The 180.5m long German-built ship was moored in Falmouth Bay when its anchor started dragging in the early hours of Tuesday morning, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) told Sky News.

 

https://news.sky.com/story/russian-cargo-ship-runs-aground-off-cornwall-beach-11584651

 

Russian cargo ship seen from the beach at Falmouth

 

 

Tracking data shows the Kuzma Minin started dragging its anchor at 11.30pm on Monday. Pic: Crondall Weather

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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1 minute ago, Stilllearning said:

Not being a mariner, having only had some small experience of sailing along the channel, I do wonder why the crew didn’t start the ships engine/s and hold their position rather than drag their anchor?

They would have to have been sober to notice.

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4 minutes ago, LadyG said:

I think there is a Marine Accident report of something similar on here, where the crew ignored the Pilot's advice, and the engines were not ready, and they only had one anchor. Engines need to be on standby if they are to be used in time.

Yes - that was the one a few weeks ago (in the Humber where it drifted & 'bumped into' a couple of other ships).

 

Irrespective of the engines being on standby, you also need a watch officer to see that you are dragging.

  • Greenie 1
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14 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Yes - that was the one a few weeks ago (in the Humber where it drifted & 'bumped into' a couple of other ships).

 

Irrespective of the engines being on standby, you also need a watch officer to see that you are dragging.

I'll bet my boots the ships log will show that there was a watch officer on duty ................................

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A number of years ago another ship bumped into Cornwall at the Lizard in fine clear weather, a Spanish or Italian freighter, can't remember which. When the coastguards went aboard the entire crew including the Captain were legless drunk, they had also been steering by a small boy scouts compass on a chair on the bridge.

Edited by bizzard
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48 minutes ago, bizzard said:

A number of years ago another ship bumped into Cornwall at the Lizard in fine clear weather, a Spanish or Italian freighter, can't remember which. When the coastguards went aboard the entire crew including the Captain were legless drunk, they had also been steering by a small boy scouts compass on a chair on the bridge.

Had they been reading the Brexit thread?

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

My bet is they bought the right anchor for the size of ship according to the anchor threads on here, but it was too heavy for the whole of the crew to chuck over the side when they needed it.

 

:giggles:

 

Yes, it's probably a Danforth folding one too. ?

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3 minutes ago, rusty69 said:

The captain obviously wasn't using the drag alarm app you can download for you smartphone. Mine is on 24/7 just incase we move in the night .

 

Cue that nice mrsmelly making a hilarious joke about them using same devices in the daytime at the western end of the... etc.

 

:giggles:

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20 minutes ago, MJG said:

The ship has been successfully refloated after being dragged off partly under it's own power and several Falmouth tugs (plus one from Fowey to give some additional grunt, in the words of HM coastguard)

Apparently it took an hour at high water with every engine at full chat before it started to move (BBC news)

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23 minutes ago, Horace42 said:

But even so, what could they have done in conditions that were causing them to drag an anchor.

1) Dropped the 2nd anchor

2) Retrieved anchor and motored out to sea

 

We have had an anchor drag a number of times - the alarm goes off, (I set the radius of the anchor alarm at the length of chain deployed to allow for swinging). If the alarm sounds you know you have moved so start the engines, retrieve the anchor, drop the anchor again and try to re-set it.

If it doesn't work repeat.

If it doesn't work head out to open water under power.

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5 hours ago, rusty69 said:

The captain obviously wasn't using the drag alarm app you can download for you smartphone. Mine is on 24/7 just incase we move in the night .

just how sensitive is it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"If the boats -  a - rockin' ... don't come a knockin"

Edited by LadyG
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9 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

1) Dropped the 2nd anchor

2) Retrieved anchor and motored out to sea

 

We have had an anchor drag a number of times - the alarm goes off, (I set the radius of the anchor alarm at the length of chain deployed to allow for swinging). If the alarm sounds you know you have moved so start the engines, retrieve the anchor, drop the anchor again and try to re-set it.

If it doesn't work repeat.

If it doesn't work head out to open water under power.

Congratulations- you have passed Second Mates orals! :)

 

Howard

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4 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Mine is actually part of the ships plotter/GPS.

 

If I set mine at 50 metres the alarm goes of at 51 metres,

Accuracy depends on the accuracy of the GPS (it may be 55 metres)

I know Alan de'E, it was rhetoric Q, 

Rusty69 is in bed, in Rusty Towers,  he's going nowhere fast :P

Edited by LadyG
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