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There is a chap near to where we live who breeds rare breed pigs for the table.  He generally has Gloucester Old Spot for chops and roasts etc and Tamworth for bacon.  He keeps them in a small wood where they forage with chickens etc.  Unfortunately it is eye wateringly expensive and whilst he breeds a good animal his butchery skills leave a lot to be desired.  The fat content is superb (loads of) and I swear you can taste Apple in the Gloucester Old Spot chops.  I absolutely love belly of pork but as I am the only one who does I don’t get to eat it much.  If it’s on a menu it’s my go to choice. 

6 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Thank you very much for the link.  Looks superb.  I think I will have a drive up there this week before we head back to NI

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26 minutes ago, Dartagnan said:

There is a chap near to where we live who breeds rare breed pigs for the table.  He generally has Gloucester Old Spot for chops and roasts etc and Tamworth for bacon.  He keeps them in a small wood where they forage with chickens etc.  Unfortunately it is eye wateringly expensive and whilst he breeds a good animal his butchery skills leave a lot to be desired.  The fat content is superb (loads of) and I swear you can taste Apple in the Gloucester Old Spot chops.  I absolutely love belly of pork but as I am the only one who does I don’t get to eat it much.  If it’s on a menu it’s my go to choice. 

Thank you very much for the link.  Looks superb.  I think I will have a drive up there this week before we head back to NI

You can definitely buy cheaper but you cannot buy better ?

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We've just come over the Oxford summit to Napton over the last couple of days. Water was very low, but not as low as when we did it last year. We had no problems whilst on the move in our 23 inch draft boat (but some moorings were too shallow to get right in to the side) but I saw several boats having difficulties. 

 

I also noticed that CRT announced today that the opening hours for the Napton and Clayton flights are being reduced further from, I think, 10 September.

 

Towpath edge vegetation was very bad in places when we went south a couple of months ago but I noticed contractors doing a very good job of strumming it back today as we headed towards Marston Doles. Less good, for propellers now, and canal depth in the future, was the fact that it was all ending up in the water!

 

I'm not sure how they are supposed to prevent this but if I understand correctly they are meant to prevent it somehow.

 

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10 hours ago, Lily Rose said:

Towpath edge vegetation was very bad in places when we went south a couple of months ago but I noticed contractors doing a very good job of strumming it back today as we headed towards Marston Doles. Less good, for propellers now, and canal depth in the future, was the fact that it was all ending up in the water!

 

I'm not sure how they are supposed to prevent this but if I understand correctly they are meant to prevent it somehow.

 

 

Here on the Coventry Canal they use leaf blowers to blow the grass cuttings into the cut. Usually a 3 man team, one mowing the main towpath with a mower, one strimming the waters edge and one following behind blowing the cuthings into the canal.

 

I agree it is helping to silt up the canals for the future, but modern maintenence practice is agreed ways host term,  so they won't have considered the cost of increased future dredging. 

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Just found this here   https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/specialist-teams/maintaining-our-waterways/vegetation-management/vegetation-faqs

 

 

Our contractor is instructed not to allow grass clippings to enter the water, however small amounts of clippings will inevitably enter the water. A failure to prevent unreasonable amounts of clippings entering the water is a breach of the Code of Practice as agreed by the contractor – as such they will be penalised and requested to remove the clippings.

 

It specifically refers to grass mowing, not bankside vegetation cutting, but presumably it applies to that as well.

 

Online complaint has been submitted.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Lily Rose said:

Just found this here   https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/specialist-teams/maintaining-our-waterways/vegetation-management/vegetation-faqs

 

 

Our contractor is instructed not to allow grass clippings to enter the water, however small amounts of clippings will inevitably enter the water. A failure to prevent unreasonable amounts of clippings entering the water is a breach of the Code of Practice as agreed by the contractor – as such they will be penalised and requested to remove the clippings.

 

It specifically refers to grass mowing, not bankside vegetation cutting, but presumably it applies to that as well.

 

Online complaint has been submitted.

 

 

.....and no coconuts either!

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Will be going up Napton this morning, destination Thames.  Keeping figures crossed that it is not going to be too bad.  We are moored half a mile from the bottom of Napton at the moment and judging by the number of Napton Narrowboat boats that went past first thing returning to base, the current restrictions are not discouraging people from going that way.

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9 minutes ago, john6767 said:

Will be going up Napton this morning, destination Thames.  Keeping figures crossed that it is not going to be too bad.  We are moored half a mile from the bottom of Napton at the moment and judging by the number of Napton Narrowboat boats that went past first thing returning to base, the current restrictions are not discouraging people from going that way.

Lucky you! Our 2018 Thames trip is done, wish we starting rather than finishing.

 

We'll probably pass at some point as we'll be setting off about 10.15 probably, with 6 locks to do to get to the bottom. 

 

It was very busy here late yesterday, quite a few boats heading down and past us at half past five, half an hour until close time and 6 locks to do. Cutting it fine!

 

Saw quite a few hire boats heading back for Friday handover.

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4 hours ago, Lily Rose said:

Just found this here   https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/specialist-teams/maintaining-our-waterways/vegetation-management/vegetation-faqs

 

 

Our contractor is instructed not to allow grass clippings to enter the water, however small amounts of clippings will inevitably enter the water. A failure to prevent unreasonable amounts of clippings entering the water is a breach of the Code of Practice as agreed by the contractor – as such they will be penalised and requested to remove the clippings.

 

It specifically refers to grass mowing, not bankside vegetation cutting, but presumably it applies to that as well.

 

Online complaint has been submitted.

 

 

 

Be interesting to see what happens with this.

 

I suspect you are right to seperate mowing and edge vegetation cutting. Unless CRT made it crystal clear that in both cases the clippings are not to enter the water,  the contractor has room to argue that he was using his initiative.

 

It takes a lot of experience to write a specification that actually delivers what you think you asked for.

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I have found the task of writing a specification quite easy to do. I have also found it difficult to follow a well written specification when the sales team have cut corners in their financial bid.

 

Managing a contract, as the client, in my view is the easy bit. You get to know the spec and ensure your contractors adhere to what is required in the way that they have signed up to. The guys on the ground are possibly three,maybe four levels away from the clever business development manager who is living happily on his commission. He's done his job, he got the contract. The regional manager instructs his Area Managerwhat to do, his Area Manager passes on to Supervisor who inturn tries to get his guys onside to deliver an almost impossible schedule of grass cutting and hedge and edge cutting. It is at this level that the contract fails, the operators just want to get the job done in the most quickest way. What's a few blades of grass in the water eh!?

 

CRT management need to get on the backs of their contacts within the Contracted Company. Otherwise the Contactual Specification is null & void. Financial penalties must be enforced. So, I say, not the fault of the guys we all see but the upper echelons of management have to accept responsibility.

Edited by Nightwatch
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9 hours ago, Lily Rose said:

Lucky you! Our 2018 Thames trip is done, wish we starting rather than finishing.

 

We'll probably pass at some point as we'll be setting off about 10.15 probably, with 6 locks to do to get to the bottom. 

 

It was very busy here late yesterday, quite a few boats heading down and past us at half past five, half an hour until close time and 6 locks to do. Cutting it fine!

 

Saw quite a few hire boats heading back for Friday handover.

You were probably down before we started, we had a bit of a minor panic, and needed to go home, so we turned below Napton and went back to above Calcutt locks to get the car from the marina and a quick drive to Solihull and back.  We actually started up Napton locks about 2:30 and are now moored near Fenny Compton.  Water level on the summit is probably 8 inches down, slow but no real issue for us.

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We came through in the last few days. The only low pound was the one below Grants and we were fine (2ft 2in draught) although after mooring there overnight someone had washed us on to the mud and it took us half an hour to get going again. I've never seen Thrupp so empty! So now we're on the Thames for a few weeks.

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9 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

We came through in the last few days. The only low pound was the one below Grants and we were fine (2ft 2in draught) although after mooring there overnight someone had washed us on to the mud and it took us half an hour to get going again. I've never seen Thrupp so empty! So now we're on the Thames for a few weeks.

We may see you we are heading for the Thames and Wey for a month or so, good this being retired!

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1.01 Grass Surfaces
The detailed requirements for cutting of grass surfaces are given below. In addition the Contractor
shall work in accordance with Part A & Part C of this document and the Trust D Tech-30 Direction:
Towpath Mowing Guidelines.


1 Purpose
To undertake all grass surface maintenance to meet the specified quality standards referred to in the
current version of the Trust D Tech-30 Direction: Towpath Mowing Guidelines as an appendix to this
document.


2 Definitions
For the purposes of this document ‘grass’ is defined to collectively include the following;
 All soft, non woody ground growing vegetation as indicated in the Part C GIS Service
Information.
 The towpath shall include areas up to 10m from the water’s edge and include up to 10 meters
on the off side of locks.
 Grassed areas greater than 10 m wide shall be included in the Part C Service information as
GIS polygons.
 Areas such as moorings may be on the offside and only have pedestrian access.
 A full width cut shall be included on all towpaths at least once per year as directed by the
delegated Service Manager, this will include all soft vegetation from hedge / boundary wall to
water’s edge.
 The water’s edge includes any area between the towpath and the normal water level of the
navigation.
 All other tall, soft vegetation, such as tall grasses nettles and brambles, overhanging the cut
width. shall be strimmed back such that there is no encroachment into the cut width as per the
specification,
 Where the Specification is to water’s edge cut nylon strimmers shall be used to ensure complete
cut
 Reservoir embankments and other steep slopes are areas that normal mowing equipment
(mowers & strimmers) are not suitable to undertake the task and specialist equipment is
required.
‘Grass’ does not include:
 Marginal aquatic plant growth and emergent plants that grow within and up to the edge of the
navigation channel.
 Invasive plant species. Refer to Specification 1.03 of this document.
 Woody vegetation with stem diameter of over 50mm


3 Scope of Work
The scope of works requires the Contractor to undertake the grass cutting of all vegetated towpaths and
amenity areas as defined by the GIS mowing plans as Part C Service Information in accordance with the
following Trust D Tech-30 Direction: Towpath Mowing Guidelines and the Environmental Action report.
The Service Manager will provide the Contractor with the GIS mowing layer indicating the task within the
Affected Property.


As part of the Contractors Plan the Contractor will develop and submit a program of work relating to the tasks
for approval by the delegated Service Manager prior to the commencement of the task.


3.1 Tasks to be included in the Specification
MR1A full width towpath grass cutting this assumes < 10m width M
MR1A full width area grass cutting per M 2 generally high use amenity areas M 2
MR2A full width towpath grass cutting this assumes <10m width M
MR2A towpath grass cutting M
MR2A Area grass cutting per M 2 generally amenity areas M 2
MR2B full width towpath grass cutting this assumes <10m width M
MR2B towpath grass cutting M
MR2B Area grass cutting per M 2 M 2
MR3A full width grass cutting this assumes <10m width M
MR3A towpath towpath grass cutting M
MR3A Area grass cutting per m 2 generally low use amenity areas M 2
TMP9 Reservoir embankments and other grassed cuttings & embankments up to
55⁰

M 2
Strimming - Soft Veg Nylon cord – Soft vegetation e.g. grass, nettles, docks M 2
Brush Cutting - typically Metal blade- mixture of coarse grasses,
bramble,nettles,bracken small saplings, elder, hawthorn blackthorn, alder, ash and
sycamore <25mm

M 2
Clearing Saw - typically Saw Blade- Large saplings- elder, hawthorn blackthorn,
alder, ash and sycamore < 75mm

M 2
Removal of all waterside (hard & soft edge) saplings >75mm including the treatment
with Glyphosate & indicator dye.

M 2

 

3.2 Mowing
In all mowing regimes, unless otherwise instructed by the delegated Service Manager the Contractor
shall undertake a full width cut including the strimming from hedge / wall boundary to the water’s edge
at least once annually. This shall include the removal of all vegetation of less than 50 mm diameter on
all sections including that of vertical masonry or steel construction at the water’s edge.
The grass shall be cut to a consistent height as outlined in the Mowing Regimes Direction D-Tech 30
without tufting or scalping. The cut grass should be sufficiently mulched so not to cause excessive
clumping. The equipment shall be sufficient of professional quality to achieve the required standard
during periods of wet and periods of rapid growing conditions. Flail and rotary type mowers can be
used when most appropriate.
Along rural stretches of canal where extended lengths of tall waterside towpath vegetation can make
mooring of craft and egress and access from/to the craft difficult, a ‘to the edge cut’. These locations
are to be indicated by the delegated Service Manager and provided to the Contractor within the
dedicated GIS layer.


3.3 Strimming
Grass growing at the bases of walls (including wash walls), fences, barriers, gates, buildings, sign
posts, mile posts, marker posts, bollards, information boards, benches, tables, bins and any other
furniture or structures within or adjoining the cut areas is to be strimmed to length as part of the
mowing regime.
Certain areas that are unsuitable for normal mowers i.e. steep slopes may be strimmed as outlined in
the safe system of work and agreed by the delegated Service Manager.
Areas such as rough grass, brambles and other woody vegetation may require strimming / brush
cutting as instructed by the delegated Service Manager.


Areas under and around benches and picnic tables are to be strimmed and, where these lay outside
the specified cut area, the immediate area around the furniture and an access to the towpath are to
be cut.
Public access points to the towpath, barriers and boundary walls/ fences identified in the GIS plans or
otherwise identified by Canal & River Trust are to be strimmed as necessary to maintain clear access
for towpath users.
The cut height of strimmed areas should not exceed the height of the grass in the remainder of the cut
area.


3.4 Removal of Waterside Saplings
The contractor shall remove all water’s edge vegetation with a stem diameter of up to 75mm including
woody growth. The vegetation is to be cut flush to the vertical or horizontal surface and the cut stem
to be treated with Glyphosate to prevent regrowth and indicated with dye as treated.
The waterside saplings may be growing in any material between the towpath to the normal water
level. The sapling may be growing in the vertical or horizontal face of masonry or soft bank.
Arising’s are to be disposed of onsite if appropriate or otherwise directed by the delegated Service
Manager.
Areas that the Contractor does not deem safe to remove such vegetation should be notified to the
delegated Service Manager.


3.5 General Guidance
Once the cutting operation is complete the Contractor shall tidy up the work area. Grass cuttings and
other arising’s laying on the towpaths, footpaths, moored craft, service duct covers, drains, access
covers, car parks or any other hard surface, walls, fences, furniture, or in herbaceous beds are to be
swept up or air blown on to adjoining grass areas.
The Contractor is to use suitable methods to ensure that as reasonably practicable cut vegetation
does not enter the watercourse or be deposited on third party property including moored craft.
The Contractor shall reinstate any damage caused to the surface or levels of the ground during grass
cutting operations. Reinstatement must be to an acceptable standard to the delegated Service
Manager.
The Contractor shall be responsible for meeting the costs of repair or replacement of any Trust or
third party owned property that is damaged by the Contractor.
Invasive plant species cut in error are to be immediately reported to the delegated Service Manager
and the course of remedial action to be agreed.
The Contractor shall advise the delegated Service Manager of any damage sustained by him or other
third parties.
The Contractor shall not apply growth regulators in any form without the instruction of the Service
Manager.
The Contractor shall remove any litter prior to grass cutting or strimming that could compromise the
finish of the cut.
The Contractor shall identify any obstructions including temporary electric supplies to moored craft.


3.6 Safe Systems of work
It is the responsibility of the Contractor to produce a safe system of work relating to the Task and
Service information provided.
The Contractor shall be supplied with the Towpath Assessment GIS layer indicating the suitability of
the towpath for ride on plant access.
Some areas may not have towpath assessments, whether a towpath assessment is or is not available
for the work site the contractor shall be required to undertake a specific assessment when accessing
the towpath.
The Contractor shall carry out a specific health and safety risk assessment for each task. Typical
hazards relating to the task may include;
 Working near water
 The use of ride on plant
 Species of injurious weeds e.g. Giant Hogweed


4 Compliance
4.1 General
The Contractor shall comply with all legal requirements relating to the operation of mechanical plant,
machinery and work equipment.
4.2 Ride-on Plant and Seat Belts
Where ride on plant is fitted with seatbelts the Contractor’s operatives shall wear these at all times.
4.3 Reversing on the Towpath
Reversing on the towpath is to be avoided wherever practicable and only undertaken when the
vehicle cannot be turned and it is necessary in order to track back to a suitable turning point.
4.4 Prohibited Areas for Ride-On Plant and Machinery
Parts of Canal & River Trust land are not suitable for ride-on plant and machinery. The Contractor
shall refer to the GIS towpath assessment to ascertain the suitability of the towpath for vehicular
access. The Contractor shall refer to Approved Standard – VEHICLE ACCESS OVER CANAL &
RIVER TRUST’S LAND INCLUDING TOWPATHS AND BRIDGES


5 Environmental & Heritage Compliance
An environmental appraisal action report will be provided by the delegated Service Manager
for this activity. This will include standard actions, similar to those shown below, in addition
to site specific actions that must also be implemented.


5.1 The Trust’s Responsibilities
Within the boundary of statutory wildlife sites consent may be required. In some cases consent is
included in a site management statement agreed with Natural England/CCW. Liaise with the Trust
Ecologist annually, preferably before the start of the financial year, to check that any necessary
consents or agreements are in place for the activity. The Trust Ecologist will liaise with the regulator
regarding the towpath mowing regime as required.
Review the towpath mowing regime with Trust Ecologist annually to establish whether changes can
be made to benefit biodiversity. Provide information of the agreed towpath mowing regime to the
Contractor.
Review the towpath mowing regime annually with the Trust Ecologist (and Landscape Architect where
possible) to establish whether changes can be made to benefit landscape character.


5.2 The Contractor’s Responsibilities:
Ensure that all those undertaking the works have the required competency including biodiversity,
heritage and spill response training. Ensure that contract specifications, validated environmental
appraisals and any additional advice, such as relevant Trust tool box talks, are either in the
possession of those carrying out the works on site or that all relevant actions have been incorporated
into the methodology for the activity.
Care must be taken to prevent damage to all structures on the canal / towpath e.g. bridges, mileposts,
bollards and signs during the works and when accessing / egressing sites. All strimmers must use
nylon cord and not a blade when strimming around and up to any historic feature.
Undertake inspections to check for animal habitats before and during the works to ensure no
disturbance to protected species, in particular water voles, nesting birds, slow worms and grass
snakes. If protected species will be disturbed by the activity STOP work, note location and inform the
delegated Service Manager.
Undertake inspections to check for invasive plant species before and during the works to ensure no
disturbance to invasive plant species - these must not be cut. If invasive plant species will be
disturbed by the activity STOP work, note location and inform the delegated Service Manager.
Take all steps to prevent pollution. Do not bring large quantities of fuel to the waterside. Refuelling of
plant or equipment must be undertaken in a manner to prevent spillage e.g. away from drains and the
waterway whenever possible and with the use of drip trays and funnels.
Avoid unnecessary disturbance to canal / towpath users. If you are aware of an angling match,
rowing regatta or similar event inform the delegated Service Manager prior to commencing work.

 

6 Reporting
 The Contractor is to report any invasive or injurious species to the delegated Service
Manager daily.
 The Contractor is to report any safety or environmental incidents to the delegated Service
Manager daily.

 

The above is part of the current contract. To save searching included in section 3.5 is 'The Contractor is to use suitable methods to ensure that as reasonably practicable cut vegetation
does not enter the watercourse or be deposited on third party property including moored craft.'


Section 2 defines 'Grass'.

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 Three lads cutting grass etc today on the south Oxford, the canal was strewn with vegetation they had cut into the canal, must make it a lot harder to collect all the clippings, but in a couple of years a digger will be needed to collect it. 

 

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3 hours ago, Nightwatch said:

I have found the task of writing a specification quite easy to do. I have also found it difficult to follow a well written specification when the sales team have cut corners in their financial bid.

 

Managing a contract, as the client, in my view is the easy bit. You get to know the spec and ensure your contractors adhere to what is required in the way that they have signed up to. The guys on the ground are possibly three,maybe four levels away from the clever business development manager who is living happily on his commission. He's done his job, he got the contract. The regional manager instructs his Area Managerwhat to do, his Area Manager passes on to Supervisor who inturn tries to get his guys onside to deliver an almost impossible schedule of grass cutting and hedge and edge cutting. It is at this level that the contract fails, the operators just want to get the job done in the most quickest way. What's a few blades of grass in the water eh!?

 

CRT management need to get on the backs of their contacts within the Contracted Company. Otherwise the Contactual Specification is null & void. Financial penalties must be enforced. So, I say, not the fault of the guys we all see but the upper echelons of management have to accept responsibility.

 

Bang on to all of that.

 

Plus, its a slippery slope from a few blades of grass in the water to a few twigs in the water. Then to the odd brach in the water too. Then finally ALL of the branches straight in the water. After all how else are three blokes supposed to cut back a mile of offside a day and still be home by 3pm?

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4 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Bang on to all of that.

 

Plus, its a slippery slope from a few blades of grass in the water to a few twigs in the water. Then to the odd brach in the water too. Then finally ALL of the branches straight in the water. After all how else are three blokes supposed to cut back a mile of offside a day and still be home by 3pm?

Excuse the pun, this needs nipping in the bid. Needs CRT management intervention. Maybe even a review of costs. I managed a major contract in Dorset. I was the second contract manager as the first manager couldn't meet the budgets. I attended a meeting in Dorchester with the clients and during that meeting they made it perfectly clear that they had questioned the figures the MITIE had forwarded as they thought it unachievable at the proposed costs. They made it clear that they wanted MITIE to be awarded the contract. But the BDM (a friend) didn't budge on the proposal. The budgets and targets were impossible. There were approximately 400 operatives cleaning 170 buildings. The target was to down manage Man hours considerably. Many of the sites were one cleaner jobs with a short time window to clean. How do you reduce from one person. I left the contract having suffered a heart attack. I was later selected for redundancy and MITIE either lost or handed the contract back six or so months later. MITIE are suffering at present, I am not sad for them!

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I was chatting for ages this afternoon to the chap moored just behind me. He also came North across the summit yesterday and saw the bankside vegetation ending up in the water. This was not grass but saplings etc that I remembered thinking was getting well out of hand when we went south a couple of months ago and badly needed doing. I mentioned that I had complained to CRT and he said that his wife had done the same. I wonder how many other complaints they received and whether they will do anything about it.

 

I can see that the vegetation has very recently been cut back between The Bridge Inn (as was) and Napton Junction (exposing just how bad the towpath is along here) so I guess these chaps are working their way South towards Fenny Compton at the moment. Perhaps if other people spot them continuing to do this and report it to CRT maybe something will get done before the summit, shallow at the best of times, gets so silted up that only kayaks etc can use this canal.

 

 

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3 hours ago, john6767 said:

You were probably down before we started, we had a bit of a minor panic, and needed to go home, so we turned below Napton and went back to above Calcutt locks to get the car from the marina and a quick drive to Solihull and back.  We actually started up Napton locks about 2:30 and are now moored near Fenny Compton.  Water level on the summit is probably 8 inches down, slow but no real issue for us.

Unless two boats called Firefly went up the Napton flight this afternoon then you passed us. We were moored in the pound above the bottom lock and were just having a swift cuppa between returning from lunch at The Folly (where I see the little shop has now closed down) and doing the last lock.

 

When I mentioned the name Firefly to the steerer (presumably you?) the reply was that there were quite a few with that name so, having expected you had gone up this morning, I accepted that and thought it must have been a coincidence that two boats called Firefly had gone up the same flight on the same day.

 

From your post I see you are based in one of the two marinas below Calcutt locks. We are as well (for just over 3 years) so perhaps our paths have crossed before, though I don't recall having noticed a boat called Firefly. 

 

 

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9 hours ago, Lily Rose said:

Unless two boats called Firefly went up the Napton flight this afternoon then you passed us. We were moored in the pound above the bottom lock and were just having a swift cuppa between returning from lunch at The Folly (where I see the little shop has now closed down) and doing the last lock.

 

When I mentioned the name Firefly to the steerer (presumably you?) the reply was that there were quite a few with that name so, having expected you had gone up this morning, I accepted that and thought it must have been a coincidence that two boats called Firefly had gone up the same flight on the same day.

 

From your post I see you are based in one of the two marinas below Calcutt locks. We are as well (for just over 3 years) so perhaps our paths have crossed before, though I don't recall having noticed a boat called Firefly. 

 

 

Yes that was me, sorry I did not get the connection!  We are in Calcutt marina, been there 8 years.

 

This morning the summit has recovered a couple of inches from last night, and is much faster going.  The vegetation debris is a real pain though.

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1 hour ago, john6767 said:

Yes that was me, sorry I did not get the connection!  We are in Calcutt marina, been there 8 years.

 

This morning the summit has recovered a couple of inches from last night, and is much faster going.  The vegetation debris is a real pain though.

 

Did you complain about the vegetation?

 

Hopefully CRT will do something if they get lots of complaints. If anyone wants to complain I've looked up the appropriate contact details so you don't have to!

 

I complained online here:   https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/contact-us/ways-to-contact-us

 

Or you can phone on 0303 040 4040.

 

Or use Twitter, if you are that way inclined...  @CRTcontactus 

 

See below for extract from the CRT website (I believe this applies equally to bankside vegetation). I think we can all (those of us who have witnessed it) agree that what is going into the water constitutes "unreasonable amounts"!

Grass cuttings in water

Our contractor is instructed not to allow grass clippings to enter the water, however small amounts of clippings will inevitably enter the water. A failure to prevent unreasonable amounts of clippings entering the water is a breach of the Code of Practice as agreed by the contractor – as such they will be penalised and requested to remove the clippings.

Pplease contact us online or call us on 0303 040 4040 to report any incidents.

 

 

 

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We are in Thrupp at the moment, and the only 2 places with low water are the summit and the pound one down from Banbury, where Twyford Wharf is.  In both case 6 to 8 inches down but not really of any great concern.  Once you get below King Sutton then most pounds have water going over the weirs at the locks.  There is certainly nothing to stop anyone coming this way.

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On 25/08/2018 at 17:32, dogless said:

 

Good to fleetingly see Lily Rose.

Face to a name... of course not so good for him ;)

Rog

We've just got back to Cropredy after a trip to Thrupp and back, during which we also fleetingly saw Lily Rose - and, on a day excursion (by 'bus) to Oxford, discovered Paneke's cosy hidey-hole, alas the boat was dogless and personless at the time. Getting to and from the mooring must entail a fair bit of reversing! We also saw Keeping Up, moored up.

   We also got semi-stuck beside Twyford Wharf, only a few feet from the towpath side. It is several years since we went down to Thrupp, and I had forgotten about the narrow bits with tall reeds either side; luckily we did not meet another boat on those stretches. Thrupp itself is manicured and delightful, though I think I'm pleased that not all the system is as kempt.

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