Jump to content

Canal & River Trust sets out plans to review boat licensing


Ray T
 Share

Featured Posts

20 February 2017

 

CANAL & RIVER TRUST SETS OUT PLANS TO REVIEW BOAT LICENSING

 

The Canal & River Trust is announcing the start of the first phase of its independent consultation about how boats are licensed on its waterways. The current licensing system has remained largely unchanged for more than two decades and is often cited by boat owners as being complex and out of date.

 

The consultation will be run by Involve, an independent charity specialising in public engagement. It aims to ask boaters the fairest and simplest way to split the important financial contribution made by the different types of boats and boaters towards the upkeep of the waterways.

 

The first step in a three-stage consultation is just starting. In stage one, Involve will interview representatives from the main boating organisations to find out their views on how the consultation should work and what it should cover.

 

During the second stage, which will run from April, Involve will host a series of in-depth workshops with boaters across the country. Participants will reflect the diversity in the boating community.

 

The final stage will be a consultation for all boat owners to give their views on the options developed during the two previous stages.

 

Ian Rogers, customer service and operations director at Canal & River Trust, said: “The current licensing system has been in place for over twenty years. Boating has changed a lot in the meantime and the Trust wants to ensure the licensing structure is fit for purpose. Feedback from boaters suggests that many feel the current licensing is overly complex and can be perceived as unfair, and this consultation seeks to discuss these areas of concern.

 

“It’s more important than ever that we plan to ensure the long-term sustainability of our waterways so that boaters can continue enjoying them both now and in the future. With income from licensing playing an important part in the charity’s finances it is essential that it is spread fairly across all types of boaters as well as other income sources like property, utilities and fundraising. This is the most significant review of licensing in a generation and I welcome the fact that boaters will be helping to decide the shape of things to come.”

 

Diane Beddoes, Associate at Involve, added: “We’re delighted to be able to help the Trust complete this important piece of work. Our brief is to apply our principles of transparency, inclusiveness and collaboration to ensure that boaters are fully involved in helping create a balanced and simple boat licensing system.”

 

Boat organisations in the first stage include:

 

Organisation:

Representing:

Association of Waterway Cruising Clubs (AWCC) Cruising Club boaters

British Marina Inland Boating (BMIB) Canal Businesses

British Marine National Trade representing all trade

Community Boat Association Charity boat owners

Dutch Barge Association Wide beam owners

Historic narrow boat club Historic narrow boat owners

Hotel Boat Association Hotel Boat Owners

Inland Waterway Association (IWA) All boating segments

National Association of Boat Owners (NABO) All boating segments

National Bargee Travellers Association (NBTA)Continuous Cruisers

Navigational Advisory Group

(Licensing & Moorings) Alll boating segments

Residential Boat Owners’ Association Residential boaters

Roving Continuous Traders Association (RCTA) Roving Traders – Continuous Cruisers

 

--------------------------------------------

Fran Read

National Press Officer

 

M 07796 610 427

Canal & River Trust, Toll House, Delamere Terrace, London, W2 6ND

Twitter: @CRTComms

Edited by Ray T
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would this impact on the Thames and Environment waters if they are brought into the fold ?

I am not a member of any boating groups and wonder how many other boaters are the same so will not have any input .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would this impact on the Thames and Environment waters if they are brought into the fold ?

I am not a member of any boating groups and wonder how many other boaters are the same so will not have any input .

 

"During the second stage, which will run from April, Involve will host a series of in-depth workshops with boaters across the country. Participants will reflect the diversity in the boating community.

The final stage will be a consultation for all boat owners to give their views on the options developed during the two previous stages."

Edited by Ray T
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder what they are specifically thinking of when mentioning “over 20 years”?



The last significant amendments to category and commensurate charge rates, of which I am aware, took place behind the scenes as the 1970 Bill was being put forward, in order that the licensing and river registration schemes could be meaningfully linked. It was finalised by the time the 1983 Act was passed, pinning rates of the latter to 60% of the former. That is over 30 years ago, at least. Agreed, that too can be described as over 20 years, but I am left thinking that some more recent revision must be in their mind.



This current plan will seek to introduce the first new ways to classify craft, where formerly charge levels have been linked to length and use only. I presume this present consultation is going to explore the possibility of factoring in width as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having quickly glanced at it I am unsure what is supposedly hard to understand and " Complex " about boat licencing? There are very few very easy to understand options including licencing private/business users at present. I think this is raising its head because some pee takers are making it so. I have had no problems personaly in my 27 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thisng they NEED to do is to standardise as per EA licences to Length x Beam

At present historic pairs are unfairly penalised while widebeams get away with it

 

That sounds fair however a lot of people have bought sensibly beamed boats that have always been licensed by length on BW waterways or CART if you like so to suddenly up the anti possibly quite considerably would I believe be unreasonable to peoples budgets. Same applies that if you buy two narrowboats the licencing will have been in force before you bought them and obviously understood the costs. Boats for instance on the Thames as we all know are licensed on area covered but to suddenly do that on CART waters would put the prices up prohibitively to some super " Historic " boats such as on the Trent.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having quickly glanced at it I am unsure what is supposedly hard to understand and " Complex " about boat licencing?

 

I don’t believe it has anything at all to do with “piss takers”; and I think the “hard to understand” and “complex” descriptions are just fluff; Chris-B has the more likely handle on the intention behind this.

ANY change could be considered unfair as you later suggest, but that is inevitable. I can remember thinking about limiting a prospective boat purchase to a length limit, only to find a year or so later that the length categories were changed. then there were the constant changes in boat safety requirements, that led to new boats being made to suit, only for certain features to be redundant foolishness when those requirements changed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That sounds fair however a lot of people have bought sensibly beamed boats that have always been licensed by length on BW waterways or CART if you like so to suddenly up the anti possibly quite considerably would I believe be unreasonable to peoples budgets. Same applies that if you buy two narrowboats the licencing will have been in force before you bought them and obviously understood the costs. Boats for instance on the Thames as we all know are licensed on area covered but to suddenly do that on CART waters would put the prices up prohibitively to some super " Historic " boats such as on the Trent.

I understand that completely Tim.. but as you will agree there are x % more wides now than ever and I like many others do feel that the price should be proportionate

Chris

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That sounds fair however a lot of people have bought sensibly beamed boats that have always been licensed by length on BW waterways or CART if you like so to suddenly up the anti possibly quite considerably would I believe be unreasonable to peoples budgets. Same applies that if you buy two narrowboats the licencing will have been in force before you bought them and obviously understood the costs. Boats for instance on the Thames as we all know are licensed on area covered but to suddenly do that on CART waters would put the prices up prohibitively to some super " Historic " boats such as on the Trent.

 

A "phased cost change" over "X" years for existing owners, may be a suggestion?

 

Don't "historic" boats already get a discount? Just asking, as I don't own an historic boat. I may get worried if CRT imposes a licence on my "historic narrowboat captain" when I take him to shows. captain.gif

Edited by Ray T
  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

whenever the question of licensing based on width x length comes up the argument about historic widebeams suddenly having to pay more appears.

 

the solution to my mind seems to be to apply a cutoff date... so (for example) any boat registered after 31/12/2018 will be charged according to width and length (area) any boat registered before 31/12/2018 will be charged according to length only.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would the fitting of 'trackers' and a 'pay-per-mile' be the fairest system ?

 

You pay (say) £2500 into your 'account', if you have unused 'credit' left at the end of the year then your next years 'deposit' is reduced and if you have used 'more' than your deposit then it is increased.

 

In effect similar to paying your domestic electricity bill based on 'average usage' and updated when you are seen to be using more or less than planned.

 

Edit to add :

 

Enforcement of 'non-moving CCers / Bridge hoppers' would need to be increased and clarity given of minimum movement expectations

Edited by Alan de Enfield
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand that completely Tim.. but as you will agree there are x % more wides now than ever and I like many others do feel that the price should be proportionate

Chris

 

Yes agreed but its going to be a big can of worms isnt it. I do also agree with Nigel above re the damned BSS thats been a crock of crap since its inception and yes as a for instance this boat is ten years old and so has twin diesel tanks to supposedly cover the fact of red diesel for heatin/propulsion blah blah........When I stop boating I am still seriously considering getting another seagoing boat to live on as the legislation is less!!

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

whenever the question of licensing based on width x length comes up the argument about historic widebeams suddenly having to pay more appears.

 

the solution to my mind seems to be to apply a cutoff date... so (for example) any boat registered after 31/12/2018 will be charged according to width and length (area) any boat registered before 31/12/2018 will be charged according to length only.

 

Yes I was thinking that as were others but to implement would be hard especialy as people who move between licensing authorities could often become unstuck cost wise. One thing for sure though I suppose is that whatever kind of boat we all own there will only be one winner............no maybe two........Anglers and cyclists.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I don’t believe it has anything at all to do with “piss takers”; and I think the “hard to understand” and “complex” descriptions are just fluff; Chris-B has the more likely handle on the intention behind this.

 

 

Oh I dunno. Doesn't the NBTA exist to assist boaters who find it had to understand which box they need to tick?

  • Greenie 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

but to suddenly do that on CART waters would put the prices up prohibitively to some super " Historic " boats such as on the Trent.

 

To be fair, they would get a bigger historic discount, since it's done on percentage, but it's a fair point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.