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alexander1234

Chimney / flue leaking tar on new boat?!!!

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I have installed a new stove, flue and chimney on my new wide ran and the paint job is getting ruined!!!

Please help!

If anyone has any ideas what I might be doing wrong I would love to hear from you?!

I have a morso squirrel with single skin flue, double skin chimney and it is causing all kinds of damage to the paint?! Is this standard???

I have plenty of tar coming out from under the chimney

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If you have the usual daft chimney that overlaps the collar flange '' this is where the goo oozes out'', then I'd do away with it and get a bit of pipe that will sit just INSIDE the collars orifice. Lightly silicon it in so that if it gets hit it just leans over with no damage. No more goo oozes out, it stays put and runs back down inside. Indeed make sure all your fuel, wood, coal and smokeless is dry. Coal is normally stored in open staithes before its bagged and at this time of year is usually bagged sopping wet. Off cuts of pipe can be had for a quid or two from a steel fabricator.

Edited by bizzard

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I'm petty sure it's seasoned hardwood .... According to the seller?!!

But it is possible it has been getting a little damp, (kept inside pram hood) do you recommend drive img by fire before use then?

Is it more likely to be a fuel issue than a chimney/installation issue then? Thanks guys

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I have installed a new stove, flue and chimney on my new wide ran and the paint job is getting ruined!!!

Please help!

If anyone has any ideas what I might be doing wrong I would love to hear from you?!

I have a morso squirrel with single skin flue, double skin chimney and it is causing all kinds of damage to the paint?! Is this standard???

I have plenty of tar coming out from under the chimney

 

 

There are two ways that what you are experiencing can happen. The most common is that your chimney does not fit well around the collar. The top of the chimney is cool, by comparison to lower down. You get condensation that runs down the inside, taking deposits down and leaking through and out at the bottom, where the chimney fits the collar. So, you need to come up with some arrangement that directs all of the deposits back down the flue and connot escape where the chimney fits the collar.

 

Another likely cause of staining is also due to some of the heated gases/deposits mixing with condensation onto the coolie hat, if you have one, this then drips onto the roof.

Edited by Higgs

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and if you have a coolie hat style cowl, take it off... it drips over and down the sides.

 

 

and dont worry, the tar stain will come off with a gentle non scratch cream cleanser...similar to 'Silky' which is I believe for caravans.

Edited by Chagall

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Fill the gap between the inner skin and the outer skin of the outside chimney using canned sprayfoam. That will stop the gunge running back between the skins and will also keep the inner skin warmer so there is less gunge condensation.

 

N

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I have used undiluted washing up liquid to remove tar stains from paintwork in the past. However it must be done soon after the deposits occur. Heavier stains can sometimes be T-Cut out.

 

Also try wrapping a strip of J-cloth around the roof boss before putting the chimney on. If this temporarily cures the tar running down the sides of the boat, it proves that it is the poor fit between the boss and the chimney. The permanent cure, as Blizzard says, is to have the chimney fitting inside, not outside the boss.

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Solved the same problem on my boat. The inner is not siliconed in place just sits inside chimney. Has worked for many years no with just the inner being replaced two years maybe more. Burn loads of wood not all has been left to mature long enough but is dry not sopping wet.

 

http://boatlife.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/is-your-chimney-messy-killer.html?m=1

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I usually make my own chimneys unless I come across some 4" OD pipe. Just pop-rivet a band round the outside a few inches up from the bottom and let it sit inside the top of the flue. Pretty much guarantees no tar problems (which is more than can be said for the double-skinned chimneys that are supposed to do that).

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Agreed, it's almost certainly because hot tar-filled gases are getting between the two chimney skins, then condensing on the inside of the outer. If the inner skin is a good close fit inside the flue, you won't get tar condensing; they used to make them a good fit but the mass-produced ones in the chandleries invariably have an inner that is too small which leaves a gap (this is so that the same chimney will fit into any size flue, the makers and sellers don't seem to care that they don't work any more).

 

My preferred solutions are either get a new chimney that fits better (you can get one made to measure, or you can buy the inner separately so you can place it inside the flue and then pop-rivet it so it's the right size) or as suggested above to fill the gap between the skins (heat-resistant sprayfoam is readily available from DIY stores). Oh yes and remove the cowl.

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Alternatively burn a fuel with very little (or no) tar in it.

 

On the last NB we have always burnt smokeless fuel - cannot remember the brand at the moment - we have no problems with tar runs.

 

Previously using excel ( and others) we had big problems with tar running - and - I could not find anything to get rid of it. The paintwork was ruined.

 

My experience of burning any wood ( however dry it is alleged to be) is that it contains a lot of tar/resin.

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We had a be-spoke chimney made not a one size fits all chimney you see from the chandlers. It doesn't even need to be pushed onto the collar tight we just drop it on. No leaks no matter what fuel we burn.

Edited by Sarah and Ian

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Yes much the same as valrene9600, a 4" tube stuck inside the chimney sticking out about inch and half above the outer proper chimney. Instead of the rivots we use a fibreglass rope about 6mm with fire proof mastic to keep it about one inch from the bottom so it just sits inside the chimney.

 

As continuous cruisers we burn all sorts of wood but make sure the chimney is swept very regularly indeed. We have never had a problem with that configuration with tar running for 16 years!

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Agree with comments about the fit of the inner chimney lining and especially the comments about coolie hats, when I fitted one to my chimney I threw it away after 2 days, never have any tar issues.

Phil

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I'm petty sure it's seasoned hardwood .... According to the seller?!!

But it is possible it has been getting a little damp, (kept inside pram hood) do you recommend drive img by fire before use then?

Is it more likely to be a fuel issue than a chimney/installation issue then? Thanks guys

 

It could be a bit of both. I always try to have a stack of would drying out beside the stove. Think you could be amazed how much lighter a log is when dried, if it has any damp in it.

 

If you can lay your hands on some fibre glass insulation or even the stuff that is put around exhausts http://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/store/product/e315.aspxand stuff that between the two walls of the the top chumney, that will reduce the heat loss.

 

Or maybe get a tailor made chimney that fits inside the collar.

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I'm petty sure it's seasoned hardwood .... According to the seller?!!

But it is possible it has been getting a little damp, (kept inside pram hood) do you recommend drive img by fire before use then?

Is it more likely to be a fuel issue than a chimney/installation issue then? Thanks guys

You need to take care with seasoned hardwood. For example Countrywide are quite open in that their seasoned hardwood is 30~50% water and to quote "Not suitable for immediate use on stoves." If you want stuff you know is dry and ready to burn then I would strongly suggest you buy kiln dried wood.

 

I think this is more like you are looking for - To quote "Kiln dried logs are dried to an average moisture content of 20% and are recommended for immediate burning on all wood burning appliances. These logs provide the ultimate clean burn with maximum heat output."

 

A couple of links for you -

 

Seasond wood - http://www.countrywidefarmers.co.uk/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID=4380

Kiln dried - http://www.countrywidefarmers.co.uk/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID=4423

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You need to take care with seasoned hardwood. For example Countrywide are quite open in that their seasoned hardwood is 30~50% water and to quote "Not suitable for immediate use on stoves." If you want stuff you know is dry and ready to burn then I would strongly suggest you buy kiln dried wood.

 

I think this is more like you are looking for - To quote "Kiln dried logs are dried to an average moisture content of 20% and are recommended for immediate burning on all wood burning appliances. These logs provide the ultimate clean burn with maximum heat output."

 

A couple of links for you -

 

Seasond wood - http://www.countrywidefarmers.co.uk/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID=4380

Kiln dried - http://www.countrywidefarmers.co.uk/pws/ProductDetails.ice?ProductID=4423

 

Even so the wood in the links is just firewood and does not specify soft or hardwood.

 

Certainly agree, burning wood with a moisture content higher then 20% is not going to get the best out of the wood.

Edited by Graham.m

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Generally, bone dry wood will give off a pleasant blue smoke and damp, wet wood gives off a dreary white steamy smoke.

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The last few bags of smokeless have contained soaked nuts. I try and give the coal merchant the benefit of the doubt, but I sometimes wonder if they wait for a damned good downpour of rain before filling up their bags for market. It's a nuisance to have to dry out on the fire, developing lots of smoke, but also, the coal's dry weight is different from the wet weight. It is sold by weight.

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The last few bags of smokeless have contained soaked nuts. I try and give the coal merchant the benefit of the doubt, but I sometimes wonder if they wait for a damned good downpour of rain before filling up their bags for market. It's a nuisance to have to dry out on the fire, developing lots of smoke, but also, the coal's dry weight is different from the wet weight. It is sold by weight.

Very likely. I've never ever seen covered coal Staithes at a merchants. Who knows in dry weather they might even hose all the coal down when no ones looking, keeping the dust down would be their excuse.

An economical way of drying coal is to load a shovel full into a baking tray and pop it into the bottom of your oven whilst baking cakes or your dinner.

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Even so the wood in the links is just firewood and does not specify soft or hardwood.

 

 

Actually the product photo and/or description states that it is Hardwood.

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Very likely. I've never ever seen covered coal Staithes at a merchants. Who knows in dry weather they might even hose all the coal down when no ones looking, keeping the dust down would be their excuse.

 

 

 

:) They do to keep the dust down. Thankfully anthracite, which is what I have, does not absorb water. Not sure about the manufacture briquets.

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Actually the product photo and/or description states that it is Hardwood.

 

Kiln dried logs are dried to an average moisture content of 20% and are recommended for immediate burning on all wood burning appliances. These logs provide the ultimate clean burn with maximum heat output.

The bulk sacks

Kiln Dried Firewood

  • Premier kiln dried firewood is the most popular pack as it provides the ultimate clean burn with the maximum heat output
  • Source: Sustainable British Woodland
  • Logs: Moisture content average 20%.
  • Log length 25cm (+/- 10%)
  • Recommended: For immediate burning on all wood burning appliances.
  • Large bulk bag (1.6 cubic metres)

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