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Okay, I didn’t know/remember that one, there is another remote one I know of. 
Clue, between Norton Jnc. and Watford locks. 

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2 minutes ago, David Mack said:

What's the difference between a "passage" under the canal and an aqueduct?

 

When it's a Culvert

 

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50 minutes ago, MIKE P said:

Okay, I didn’t know/remember that one, there is another remote one I know of. 
Clue, between Norton Jnc. and Watford locks. 

Are you sure, I know that stretch very well and cant picture it.....or think where one might be needed.

3 minutes ago, Tim Lewis said:

 

When it's a Culvert

 

The passage at Cosgrove is where the canal crosses the end of Main Street with The Stocks lane on the other side, with a pedestrian single arch underneath.

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2 minutes ago, David Mack said:

What's the difference between a "passage" under the canal and an aqueduct?

 

Thats a bit like 'whats the difference between a tunnel and a bridge', or when does one become the other.

 

Though aqueducts generally cover a greater distance and are over another feature like a river/canal/road/valley rather than a passage which is normally only wide enough for a person on foot, possibly with a horse to pass through.

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4 minutes ago, matty40s said:

Are you sure, I know that stretch very well and cant picture it.....or think where one might be needed.

The passage at Cosgrove is where the canal crosses the end of Main Street with The Stocks lane on the other side, with a pedestrian single arch underneath.

 

P8150023.JPG

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Are you sure, I know that stretch very well and cant picture it.....or think where one might be needed

 

I’m quite sure Matty40s. 
24A20D30-F45B-4307-B757-D1E92154A974.jpeg.295bf79877eb69683d0eb42c84fa4582.jpeg

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37 minutes ago, David Mack said:

What's the difference between a "passage" under the canal and an aqueduct?

How much it can leak? The one at the turn into Bugsworth seems to have leaked onto the path beneath for as many years as can remember.

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7 minutes ago, MIKE P said:

 

Are you sure, I know that stretch very well and cant picture it.....or think where one might be needed

 

I’m quite sure Matty40s. 
24A20D30-F45B-4307-B757-D1E92154A974.jpeg.295bf79877eb69683d0eb42c84fa4582.jpeg

I'm astounded, I moored 6 boats along from that for 9 months a while back and never knew that existed....although the bottom bit where the storage units are now wasnt used then and quite overgrown.

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6 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

I have always been under the impresion a culvert is a waterway underneath a road / railway / canal etc.

Not a footpath,

You're right, I'm trying to to do too many things at the same time, this afternoon.😒

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12 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

I have always been under the impresion a culvert is a waterway underneath a road / railway / canal etc.

Not a footpath,

 

Quite so. A similar feature designed to take a path or roadway under a road, railway or canal might more properly be described as a tunnel.

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17 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

I have always been under the impresion a culvert is a waterway underneath a road / railway / canal etc.

Not a footpath,

Usually yes, a stream or drain for example, not sure if exclusively though.

I had thought that it came from the French couvert (covered) but the internet does not support this view, and I'm away from my dictionaries at the moment.

2 minutes ago, NB Alnwick said:

 

Quite so. A similar feature designed to take a path or roadway under a road, railway or canal might more properly be described as a tunnel.

...though, just to, muddy the, er, waters, a tunnel can of course carry water.

 

We are perhaps on the safest ground sticking to Mike P's perfectly serviceable "passage".

Edited by Athy
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1 minute ago, Athy said:

Usually yes, a stream or drain for example, not sure if exclusively though.

I had thought that it came from the French couvert (covered) but the internet does not support this view, and I'm away from my dictionaries at the moment.

 

 

The farm we used to own, of which part encompassed the Ffrwd Canal, was the site of the old Ffrwd coal mine, steel works and brick manufacturing, in the bottom of the valley ran a feeder to the river Cegidog, the old mine records show that this stream was 'culverted' for about 3/4 of a mile to allow the ground to be levelled and used for the mine spoil heaps, and coal storage yard. The stream had a brick (made on site) tunnel built over it. Every now and again child-miners were sent into the tunnel (culvert) to clear blockages. Eventually steel bars were set into the end of the tunnel. The mine closed in (I think 1905) after an underground fire, due to the Assistand Manager bringing the pit-ponies to the surface for the August bank-holiday and shutting off the ventilation fans to save electricity. 

 

I have always understood 'culvert' to mean covered, but only in the context of covering water.

 

Looking at the interweb every dictionary, wikipedia and even building construction and Architects seem to have a very similar definition for Culvert.

 

A culvert is a closed conduit or tunnel used to convey water from one area to another, normally from one side of a road to the other side.

Typically culverts are box shaped, round or elliptical in cross section. They are often pre-fabricated and can be made from pipes, reinforced concrete or other materials that are embedded within the surrounding landscape to create a bridge-like structure that permits the stable and proper flow of water under an obstacle such as a road, and can help alleviate flooding and reduce erosion.

Culverts can also be used to move rainwater runoff along, under or away from highways.

The difference between a bridge and a culvert is that a bridge is intended to allow passage over an obstacle such as a body of water, whereas a culvert is intended to permit a body of water to pass under an obstacle such as a road. A culvert is provided for the ‘benefit’ of the water, and typically has a base over which the water flows. A bridge is provided for the passage of traffic, and provides a base over which that traffic can pass.

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There are two passages under the canal at Cosgrove aqueduct, one at each end of it. According to the information board that was there in 2005, they are "cattle creeps, built to give cattle access to fields on either side of the canal."

 

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They have been doing some work in a field between the road and the Monty at Garthmyl, south of Welshpool, and 2 brick arches have been exposed that appear to go under the canal. Unfortunately I haven't been able to stop to get a photo or see what is going on.
Roughly between here and the white cottage
https://goo.gl/maps/djCqGpSzCC38nksK9

Edited by Graham Davis
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IIRC the Cosgrove one is cross sectioned like a horse..... for obvious reasons.

 

Are you just wanting "cattle creeps" and or designed for persons?

 

If it's culverts carrying water there are loads.

Edited by mark99
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This is the River Churnet running under the Caldon Canal at Hazlehurst. There are recognised aqueducts a few yards either side of it, is it a culvert?

 

 

122 Caldon Canal Hazlehurst 31st July 2005_2.JPG

 

124 Caldon Canal Hazlehurst 31st July 2005_2.JPG

Edited by Tim Lewis
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