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Tips for removing Diesel Fumes


lionfish
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Hello,

Anybody have some good tips for removing Diesel fume smells from the boat cabin? 

 

My best bet so far is to give the bilge a good clean. My suspicion is the vapour is getting in through door vents but potentially originating in the bilge. 

 

She's a big boat 57ftx10ft. I ve been on my friends Semi-trad and no bad smell at all, very strawberry jelly. 

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5 minutes ago, lionfish said:

Hello,

Anybody have some good tips for removing Diesel fume smells from the boat cabin? 

 

My best bet so far is to give the bilge a good clean. My suspicion is the vapour is getting in through door vents but potentially originating in the bilge. 

 

She's a big boat 57ftx10ft. I ve been on my friends Semi-trad and no bad smell at all, very strawberry jelly. 

 

Why is your bilge full of disesl ?

 

Repair the leak (source of the smell) and leave the windows and doors open - a fan will help remove the fumes.

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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When we had a diesel smell in the cabin I traced it to a leaking union on a feed pipe to the diesel fired hob.  A very careful nip-up of the joint cured the problem. A bit of diesel goes a long way.  Check any diesel fired stoves, hobs, warm air heaters, CH boliers for leaks.

 

Plus what all the others have said.

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I worked on oil tankers and when I came home on leave it became obvious that there was a lingering smell of fuel on me and my clothes. As we lived with it for up to a year at a time never noticed . When we brought the barge near Antwerp the old recognisable smell was always in the air from the refineries.

where we live west of Banbury there is often a faint smell of coffee from the big factory there.

 

 

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 Henry De Salis, a director FMC, in a paper presented to the Institute of Mining Engineers in 1898 wrote: 

 

The use of petroleum (i.e. diesel) or paraffin oil for working motors . . . is not permissible on vessels carrying damageable cargo, on account of the all-pervading and most penetrating smell given off by it. The writer has lately inspected the wooden hull of a canal tug-boat (i.e. a motor) from which a petroleum-engine had been removed after a few months' work in order to give place to a steam-engine, and  although the engine and the top and sides of the engine-room down to the gunwale had been removed for some days, the odour of petroleum arising from it was most pungent. Of all types of internal-combustion engine, the author considers the suction gas-engine open to the least number of objections for use for canal-boat propulsion ; but it has yet to prove its ability to keep time with steam on long journeys.

The most desirable motor of all for the purpose would doubtless be an electric motor driven by storage batteries, to be exchanged for others freshly charged as required at different points on the canal, but such a system must of necessity await the invention of an accumulator of less weight and size, and costing less to maintain, than any that are on the market at the present time.

 

So suction gas engines (what are these?) or electric motors seem to be the only alternatives to steam!

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