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Halsey

Looking for a short historic boat

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I just thought I would drop a line to those of you in the know

 

We are looking for a short historic narrow beam canal boat of some kind (not wooden) - no fixed thoughts but not a project/survey failure and not a hard/deep boat to cruise.

 

Funds readily available for the right boat - please let me know/PM me if you hear/know of anything 
 
"Zulu" will be on sale with Tony at Norton Junction eff immediately and physically there for viewings in app 2 weeks time
 
This will be a live “wanted” until we get the right boat which if it's tomorrow or next year (whilst the world settles to the new "norm") is fine.
 
Best wishes and keep safe

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Good luck. But it doesn't seem ten minutes since you bought Zulu, a most distinctive boat which I've admired a few times on the Ashby. Are you fed up with her already?

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15 minutes ago, Athy said:

Good luck. But it doesn't seem ten minutes since you bought Zulu, a most distinctive boat which I've admired a few times on the Ashby. Are you fed up with her already?

Far from it - it was very difficult decision BUT we have decided following our house move and some pressing family issues that we want/need to spend more time at home particularly for the next 18 months so we want much more of a hobby boat - it is in fact 2 years since we bought her in which time we have done loads of work incl re-paint new electrics etc etc but she isn't going to get the right level of use and perhaps isn't setting the right direction of travel for us - we may not buy again after 50 years cruising about ,but we both feel we could still be tempted by the right boat - lets see what, if anything, comes up.

  • Greenie 2

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26 minutes ago, Richard T said:

I know it (and Sarah) well - lovely boat but wooden bottom - if we were younger I would take it on but not for us at this time 

a good example which I have always regretted not buying is Sudbury

3 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

Is Elizabeth still on the market...?

Too big too deep too heavy too much of a project...........

Edited by Halsey

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19 minutes ago, Halsey said:

I know it (and Sarah) well - lovely boat but wooden bottom - if we were younger I would take it on but not for us at this time 

a good example which I have always regretted not buying is Sudbury

Too big too deep too heavy too much of a project...........

I wasn't allowed to even go and look at Sudbury!!!

  • Horror 1

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A few months ago you could have had Tycho.

163 Apsley  To Bulbourne 26th October 2019.JPG

 

As far as I know Theophilus is still available as a kit-of-parts at Glascote.

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Sudbury is an interesting boat. I considered buying it as I always quite liked it but it didn't seem to handle all that well. 

Not sure if this is a feature of shortened Yarwoods boats or just that one but there was something a bit funny about it. Plus the cabin is a bit boxy. 

 

And a noisy HR Lister in there. 

 

Still a nice boat though and the cabin extension is useful for comfort. 

 

 

ETA I always liked Caldy but I think that might be one of the boats which stays with its owner for a long long time. 

 

 

Edited by magnetman

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2 hours ago, David Mack said:

A few months ago you could have had Tycho.

163 Apsley  To Bulbourne 26th October 2019.JPG

 

As far as I know Theophilus is still available as a kit-of-parts at Glascote.

It was on my radar but as you say I missed it ...................I wanted the potential to perhaps put an undercloth  "pod" in the open hold - thanks re Theo' I have made general contact with Sarah via HNBC.

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On 14/05/2020 at 17:21, Richard T said:

 

On 14/05/2020 at 17:45, Halsey said:

I know it (and Sarah) well - lovely boat but wooden bottom - if we were younger I would take it on but not for us at this time 

I think it worth pointing out that the vast majority of the wooden bottom in PRINCESS ANNE is almost new, being fitted by Brinklow Boat services only a few years ago. This bottom was replaced from the fore end to the engine room, as well as several under the back cabin / engine room with only a few older but perfectly serviceable bottom boards remaining in place. This bottom is made of opepe and will outlast most steel bottoms of a similar age so really is not a negative point, especially on a boat being used for pleasure. I took a look at this bottom a couple of months ago when it was on the dock at Brinklow and it looked very good. PRINCESS ANNE represents remarkable value to my mind and really ought to be snapped up as just about everything has been done (at great expense), let alone it being a boat with a very strong history.

 

It is a tragedy that almost every composite 'historic' boat has been re-bottomed in steel, and that today's 'enthusiasts' reject a wooden bottom based upon the hearsay of those who know no better or the memories of soggy life expired 1950's elm bottoms of the past. Foreign woods have transformed this situation, and improved construction practice combined with modern adhesives and sealants mean that wooden bottoms, cabins, gunwales, cants, decks e.t.c. can and should be preserved - the alternative is that 'historic' boats will become modern welded steel pleasure boats that only give the outward appearance of being something that they are not  :captain:

 

edit - I have deliberately placed this into two separate threads as I think boats with new / fairly new bottoms of foreign wood (opepe) are getting unnecessary bad press. So many potential owners / enthusiasts do not seem to understand that a new wooden bottom should outlast a steel bottom of the same age with the same level of maintenance.

Edited by pete harrison
  • Greenie 4

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7 hours ago, pete harrison said:

 

I think it worth pointing out that the vast majority of the wooden bottom in PRINCESS ANNE is almost new, being fitted by Brinklow Boat services only a few years ago. This bottom was replaced from the fore end to the engine room, as well as several under the back cabin / engine room with only a few older but perfectly serviceable bottom boards remaining in place. This bottom is made of opepe and will outlast most steel bottoms of a similar age so really is not a negative point, especially on a boat being used for pleasure. I took a look at this bottom a couple of months ago when it was on the dock at Brinklow and it looked very good. PRINCESS ANNE represents remarkable value to my mind and really ought to be snapped up as just about everything has been done (at great expense), let alone it being a boat with a very strong history.

 

It is a tragedy that almost every composite 'historic' boat has been re-bottomed in steel, and that today's 'enthusiasts' reject a wooden bottom based upon the hearsay of those who know no better or the memories of soggy life expired 1950's elm bottoms of the past. Foreign woods have transformed this situation, and improved construction practice combined with modern adhesives and sealants mean that wooden bottoms, cabins, gunwales, cants, decks e.t.c. can and should be preserved - the alternative is that 'historic' boats will become modern welded steel pleasure boats that only give the outward appearance of being something that they are not  :captain:

 

edit - I have deliberately placed this into two separate threads as I think boats with new / fairly new bottoms of foreign wood (opepe) are getting unnecessary bad press. So many potential owners / enthusiasts do not seem to understand that a new wooden bottom should outlast a steel bottom of the same age with the same level of maintenance.

Likewise I’ll reply to this on both threads,

 

Well said Pete,

 

I had intended to make the same points myself this evening - you beat me to it

 

 

  • Greenie 1

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On 14/05/2020 at 19:06, Richard T said:

I wasn't allowed to even go and look at Sudbury!!!

Sudbury, amongst others, Bradeley, July 1987.

 

I tendered, unsuccessfully ...

558764004_SudburyatBradeleyJuly1987.jpg.31c310250107ff58acb149fbe3b056f7.jpg

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3 hours ago, Rob-M said:

I nearly choked on my cup of tea when I read that description - built by Harland and Wolff circa 1948 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Actually the hull was built by W.J. Yarwood and Sons Ltd., and was delivered to Fellows, Morton and Clayton Ltd. om 05 May 1948. GORSE was completed at Uxbridge Dock by 'British Waterways' and entered service during the spring / summer of 1951. This information is readily accessible :captain: 

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13 minutes ago, pete harrison said:

I nearly choked on my cup of tea when I read that description - built by Harland and Wolff circa 1948 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Actually the hull was built by W.J. Yarwood and Sons Ltd., and was delivered to Fellows, Morton and Clayton Ltd. om 05 May 1948. GORSE was completed at Uxbridge Dock by 'British Waterways' and entered service during the spring / summer of 1951. This information is readily accessible :captain: 

I laughed myself when I read it, they could have looked on HNBC and got the correct builder.

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17 minutes ago, Halsey said:

Thanks but I've reviewed it already and she's not what I want - AS engine 3'6" draft and at the moment IMHO well overpriced 

This end of GORSE (the original stern) has an Ailsa Craig RL2 engine, and is highly unlikely to have a draft of 3'6'' :captain:

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34 minutes ago, pete harrison said:

I nearly choked on my cup of tea when I read that description - built by Harland and Wolff circa 1948 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Actually the hull was built by W.J. Yarwood and Sons Ltd., and was delivered to Fellows, Morton and Clayton Ltd. om 05 May 1948. GORSE was completed at Uxbridge Dock by 'British Waterways' and entered service during the spring / summer of 1951. This information is readily accessible :captain: 

I was surprised to read the description as well. I sold Gorse to the current owner in 1986. It had a draught of around 2'9" if I remember correctly, the counter is taller from the waterline than most of the other josher motors. I remember the front was hugely overbuilt by waterways and was a very strong boat. The engine I put in to the boat around 1984 I think to replace and aged SR2. Bit quirky but went well. I am sure I told him at the time it was Yarwoods boat!

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11 minutes ago, Admiral said:

It had a draught of around 2'9" if I remember correctly, the counter is taller from the waterline than most of the other josher motors.

 

I remember the front was hugely overbuilt by waterways and was a very strong boat.

It is my understanding that all of this batch of Josher motors were built with deeper counters in order to reduce draft. 2'9'' to 3'0'' would sound reasonable to me.

 

My understanding (from Trevor Maggs) is that the fore ends of both ANTONY and GORSE were constructed by Charles Watts Engineering, Rugby, and this was following their acquisition by Willow Wren Hire Cruisers Ltd., Rugby :captain:

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It's quite a good varnished shed. Silly sleeping arrangement. Not 'cottagey' though - no rising damp, no mould, no peeling plaster, no wonky walls and creaky floorboards  . . . .

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2 hours ago, pete harrison said:

 

 

My understanding (from Trevor Maggs) is that the fore ends of both ANTONY and GORSE were constructed by Charles Watts Engineering, Rugby, and this was following their acquisition by Willow Wren Hire Cruisers Ltd., Rugby :captain:

Yes, that’s right, there is still a picture of the completed hull of Gorse above Charles Watts trade counter

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The other end of Gorse was up for sale, don't know if it is still available but 65 percent new boat.

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You are probably aware by now that Zulu is for sale at Tollhouse - if any historic owners have had enough and want a classic (more useable) boat I would be happy to discuss part exchange - it would have to fit my criteria as above (short quirky) with a value of about £40k 

PM me with ideas..............(or any questions about Zulu!)

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