Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
Steviesax

Solid double glazed cratch windows ?

Featured Posts

We have a wooden cratch with canvas covers with integral soft plastic windows with zipped over covers. This covers our prow deck where the floor level is the same as the rest of our boat with bench seating running round the prow and a table giving us a useful dining area. Problem is that despite good quality canvas covers and copious PTFE spraying when it rains heavily water does get in, its damp and the upholstery is getting watermarked. It's a great little facility in the summer but although we have a couple of fin radiators in there it can still be a bit chilly in winter. We are considering replacing the canvas with some form of rigid structure with double glazed windows so the area is warmer, less damp and we can use it more.....a bit like a conservatory ! Anyone out there have anything like this or seen on other nb's pls ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks big d, I saw this too on Pinterest.

It's ok but we'd want to be able to open the windows too in summer. Maybe we'll have to design something ourselves from conventional house windows or customised nb windows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From a BSS point of view you will have to make sure that you can still exit from the bow, so it will need some form of opening window / hatch if you haven't got a side hatch or similar somewhere else on the boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BilgePump said:

From a BSS point of view you will have to make sure that you can still exit from the bow, so it will need some form of opening window / hatch if you haven't got a side hatch or similar somewhere else on the boat.

I think you will find its an advisory on a private craft

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I think you will find its an advisory on a private craft

 

Ah, didn't realise that. Examiner just asked me size of the houdini hatch and said it was fine. Still, personally I kind of like two easy exits from a boat, and it wouldn't be too hard to make an opening window in a conservatory style cratch structure..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, BilgePump said:

Ah, didn't realise that. Examiner just asked me size of the houdini hatch and said it was fine. Still, personally I kind of like two easy exits from a boat, and it wouldn't be too hard to make an opening window in a conservatory style cratch structure..

Explosive bolts holding the windows in. 😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, BilgePump said:

Ah, didn't realise that. Examiner just asked me size of the houdini hatch and said it was fine. Still, personally I kind of like two easy exits from a boat, and it wouldn't be too hard to make an opening window in a conservatory style cratch structure..

Same here.  Remember the BSS is not to protect you on your boat, that's your responsibility, its to protect others they say. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Same here.  Remember the BSS is not to protect you on your boat, that's your responsibility, its to protect others they say

Being a cynic, I agree. Sometimes their resolve wavers somewhat

(For example and for no other reason  than for argument - CO detectors....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go the double glazing route maybe you could look at static caravan style as the frame profile is quite thin from memory. 

  • Happy 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Explosive bolts holding the windows in. 😁

Explosive bolts were tried on the wings of an American fighter plane many years ago.The theory was that if the pilot  pulled too much G,the bolts on the wing outer sections exploded releasing the wing outer panels so protecting the main part of the wing from  breaking off.

It didn't work in practice because usually the bolts on one wing would explode but the other wing bolts didn't.It led to some incredible airobatic displays,so the idea was dropped.

After that the exploding bolts were replaced with the usual bolts,and the pilot told not to pull too much G.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

Explosive bolts were tried on the wings of an American fighter plane many years ago.The theory was that if the pilot  pulled too much G,the bolts on the wing outer sections exploded releasing the wing outer panels so protecting the main part of the wing from  breaking off.

It didn't work in practice because usually the bolts on one wing would explode but the other wing bolts didn't.It led to some incredible airobatic displays,so the idea was dropped.

After that the exploding bolts were replaced with the usual bolts,and the pilot told not to pull too much G.

 

 

Only in America....!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, OldGoat said:

Being a cynic, I agree. Sometimes their resolve wavers somewhat

(For example and for no other reason  than for argument - CO detectors....)

The justification was that you needed the alarms in YOUR boat so you could sense the gasses coming in from ANOTHER boat, in which case they would be affecting the 3rd party so CO detectors were justified.

 

It would be better to not produce CO in the 1st place, but if you do, then you are 'responsible' for who it affects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

The justification was that you needed the alarms in YOUR boat so you could sense the gasses coming in from ANOTHER boat, in which case they would be affecting the 3rd party so CO detectors were justified.

 

It would be better to not produce CO in the 1st place, but if you do, then you are 'responsible' for who it affects.

"You can't be serious ???"

That sounds like politicians' speak - totally impractical methinks - Shirley the chance of CO passing from one boat to another and not instantly blowing away in the wind is less than infinitessimal, innit?

However I take your point  - it's reasonable to have a CO monitor - where it can get contentious is if an examiner insists on it being put where My Management would object (she and I don't like flashing lights in the sleeping area onboard - but the BSS states that's what's required).

Of course we could turn them off - but defeats the whole object, dunnit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, OldGoat said:

"You can't be serious ???"

That sounds like politicians' speak - totally impractical methinks - Shirley the chance of CO passing from one boat to another and not instantly blowing away in the wind is less than infinitessimal, innit?

 

No its not, there was a case last year where the boater needed hospital treatment due to CO from an external source coming in via the vents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, OldGoat said:

"You can't be serious ???"

Absolutely serious :

 

From the BSS website :

 

2.2 Why now were mandatory new BSS Requirements being considered?

In the past two years new information about the potential risk to boaters presented by CO has brought the need for action into focus. From the recent evidence collected, people and their pets aboard their own boats are at medium risk of CO poisoning from sources of CO generated outside of the boat by others e.g. the use of engines and appliances on adjacent boats.

The recently identified potential risk cannot be controlled by boat owners themselves. The risk is enhanced by the fact that CO is a hidden danger.

The circumstances fall within the remit of the Scheme to have in place measures that protect boat owners from the activity of others. In these circumstances a mandatory new BSS Requirement is warranted, as opposed to an ‘Advice check’.

 

https://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/about-us/co-alarm-consultation/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Explosive bolts holding the windows in. 😁

And a Martin Baker mechanism on the side seats. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Spinderella said:

If you go the double glazing route maybe you could look at static caravan style as the frame profile is quite thin from memory. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys & Gals.....this topic has gone way off track....exploding bolts CO2 issues !@?....I'm looking for ideas and advice on permanent cratch windows please 🤗😊

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Steviesax said:

Guys & Gals.....this topic has gone way off track....exploding bolts CO2 issues !@?....I'm looking for ideas and advice on permanent cratch windows please 🤗😊

I cannot see where CO2 has been discussed.

 

CO (which is a deadly gas) has been discussed and one would have thought that it would be a valuable point to make if you are considering making a double glazed sealed cratch.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Steviesax said:

Guys & Gals.....this topic has gone way off track....exploding bolts CO2 issues !@?....I'm looking for ideas and advice on permanent cratch windows please 🤗😊

The boat I now own had something similar although floor level wasn't the same as cabin. Speaking to the previous owner, access was the main issue as even with 'doors that opened on both sides of the boat you had to crouch down very low/contort yourself to enter from the bow. The triangular piece of glass was a single glaze, the area suffered from condensation even though all non glazed areas were insulated.  I saw the boat advertised when it first went on sale and immediately rejected it as it looked hideous even though the extension was well made.

 

After 6 months or so the boat hadn't sold and the owner was advised to remove the extension - I snapped the boat up... (I like easy access through the bow doors as a 'usual' entry to the boat - we are all different).

 

Not very helpful reply but at least on topic!

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I would think the best way would be to have wood frames like house windows with d/ glassing units .

you could have opening windows like fire exits  as doors to get in and out 

Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our floor is at the same level right into the prow deck we can walk straight into it without crouching down....that's why we had it built that way....

.I'll try to post pics ehich may help

20171218_080829.jpg

20171218_080817.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go....much easier to see photos than to describe 🤗 the table obviously slots into the Desmo fittings in our prow "snug " which is where we are considering something to replace the current cratch canvas arrangement. The bed folds away to enable free passage through the boat during the day and simlpy drops down across the full width of the boat at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep enclose that in double glazed windows and a specially formed roof you will almost certainly stop any leaks. I do wonder how much extra condensation you will create though without extra ventilation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.