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Ice blasting companies


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Hi,

 

 

I'm renovating a large Dutch barge with a hold about 5m x 24m. The ribs needs a good blasting to get rid of surface rust.

 

I've got a water blaster with a shot blast attachment. I tried it on a test area and it worked fine but I'd prefer to not have to deal with the waste when doing the entire interior.

 

I've heart that an alternative to shot blasting is ice crystal blasting. Has anyone any experience of this or able to recommend a contractor?

 

The barge is in Hampshire BTW.

 

Thanks in advance for any pointers,

 

Paul

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Hi,

 

 

I'm renovating a large Dutch barge with a hold about 5m x 24m. The ribs needs a good blasting to get rid of surface rust.

 

I've got a water blaster with a shot blast attachment. I tried it on a test area and it worked fine but I'd prefer to not have to deal with the waste when doing the entire interior.

 

I've heart that an alternative to shot blasting is ice crystal blasting. Has anyone any experience of this or able to recommend a contractor?

 

The barge is in Hampshire BTW.

 

Thanks in advance for any pointers,

 

Paul

why would the waste from ice blasting be any different from water blasting?

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Another alternative is ultra high pressure water blasting - the pressure is high enough that no solid abrasive is needed. I've seen it in action and was very impressed. Nothing to clean up, except what comes off the surface you're blasting.

  • Greenie 1
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Another alternative is ultra high pressure water blasting - the pressure is high enough that no solid abrasive is needed. I've seen it in action and was very impressed. Nothing to clean up, except what comes off the surface you're blasting.

 

We used to do that at Adelaide Dock in the 80s, mainly for the reason given - there is far less grot to get rid of. It was powerful enough to blast holes in any dodgy bits of hull. We did have to introduce a little grit on new steel occasionally, especially if it had mill scale on, to lightly abrade the surface so it would take paint better. I can't imagine why it is not more widely used. We hired the plant in as necessary, but I can't recall where from now.

 

Tam

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We used to do that at Adelaide Dock in the 80s, mainly for the reason given - there is far less grot to get rid of. It was powerful enough to blast holes in any dodgy bits of hull. We did have to introduce a little grit on new steel occasionally, especially if it had mill scale on, to lightly abrade the surface so it would take paint better. I can't imagine why it is not more widely used. We hired the plant in as necessary, but I can't recall where from now.

 

Tam

 

 

With the modern blasters that work with a pressure of between 2500 and 3000 bar (35000 and 42000 psi) everything is removed and leaves a surface ready for the paint systems.

 

These blasters are incredibly powerful, they're even used for concrete demolition.

 

Peter.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi All,

 

Thanks for all of the info - I went for high pressure water blasting as recommended by many. Did a great job and welders were able to weld straight onto the result.

 

Still amazing how much gunk comes off the interior of a 100 yr old barge! Lots of shovelling and sweating after the job! No easy way around this as the barge has 44 ribs.

 

All the best,

 

Paul

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With the modern blasters that work with a pressure of between 2500 and 3000 bar (35000 and 42000 psi) everything is removed and leaves a surface ready for the paint systems.

 

These blasters are incredibly powerful, they're even used for concrete demolition.

 

Peter.

I have seen 36" steel pipelines with wall thickness of about an inch cut clean through with it, preped ready to weld a flange on.

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Most of the Spaghetti Junction concrete has been repaired/restored using ultra high pressure water blasting. For those that have done the BCN this summer, the M5 is now getting the treatment near the Titford access flight. (can't remember what the locks are called at this time of night)

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Some blasting is done with dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) which evaporates rapidly to leave less mess.

Does anyone else find it strange that a gas which is cited as the highest contributor to global warming can be used commercially in this way?

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