Jump to content

Washing up water with suds.


Featured Posts

This is probably a damn fool question but what do you do with the washing up water that has soap suds in it? Surely it can't go into the canal and less so in a marina? It certainly can't go into the loo cassette.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably a damn fool question but what do you do with the washing up water that has soap suds in it? Surely it can't go into the canal and less so in a marina? It certainly can't go into the loo cassette.

 

I don't think it's a daft question but unfortunately what else would you do with it?? and water with shower gel suds? - same problem.

 

You can get eco friemdly stuff if it concerns you...

Link to post
Share on other sites

From Waterscape...

 

http://www.waterscape.com/media/documents/1784.pdf

 

Don’t pump oily water from your bilge into the waterway. Wellmaintained engines shouldn’t leak oil, but check the drip tray under

the engine and gearbox regularly. Use biodegradable oils, if possible.

Avoid spilling petrol and diesel. If you do, mop it up – don’t use

detergents.

 

The toilets on your boat mustn't discharge sewage into the waterway.

There are pump-out facilities for chemical or closed toilet systems at

marinas and sanitary stations. Use the minimum amount of chemicals

to avoid upsetting the sewage treatment system. If you have a closed

toilet system, you may not need to use chemicals at all – so check

your manual.

 

The wastewater outlet from your sink and shower is allowed to flow straight

into the waterway. But to help keep the water as healthy as possible, put

your cooking waste in the bin, use phosphate-free detergents and be

economical with everything you put down the sink

Edited by Robbo
Link to post
Share on other sites

We always use Environmentally friendly detergents, the own-label ones from Tesco are only a few pence dearer than the unfriendly stuff like Fairy/Persil etc

 

 

Thanks for that tip. I used to use Ecover until I got fed up with the enormous price difference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that tip. I used to use Ecover until I got fed up with the enormous price difference.

I also found it wasnt as good as fairy and you ended up using much more!

- On the boat we've very careful with how much we use, but im very careful on land too.

- I use ecover washing machine fluid however, that appears to be good. (on land, that is)

 

 

Daniel

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found this forum to be a very useful place for tips on good eco friendly washing up liquids, shampoos and conditioners, shower gels, soaps and laundry detergents. My favourite is our eco balls for the washing machine, which are ace.

 

Once you get used to the lack of foam with eco products, and the lack of a chemical fragrance, the quality is as good as chemical products.

 

We bung most stuff down the sink - the rest (e.g. leftover soup, coffee grouds etc) goes directly into the canal to save blocking our pipes ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

We bung most stuff down the sink - the rest (e.g. leftover soup, coffee grouds etc) goes directly into the canal to save blocking our pipes ;)

 

I felt a bit guilty the first few times I threw the contents of the cafetiere into the canal, until I realised that sending it down the drain had the same effect, it all ends up in the canal. Now we do the same as Dekazer, and we use eco products.

 

What do you use to unstop the pipes? The liquid we use at home is definitely not environmentally friendly, and on the boat it goes into the canal when poured into the pipes. Is there an eco-friendly product?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I felt a bit guilty the first few times I threw the contents of the cafetiere into the canal, until I realised that sending it down the drain had the same effect, it all ends up in the canal. Now we do the same as Dekazer, and we use eco products.

 

What do you use to unstop the pipes? The liquid we use at home is definitely not environmentally friendly, and on the boat it goes into the canal when poured into the pipes. Is there an eco-friendly product?

 

I wait til I'm in drydock to clean the sink pipes. Then, anything evil can go into a bucket. I also use kitchen roll to mop up any fat rather than chuck it down the drain and any food scraps go in the dog, anyway, so we don't really get bad blockages.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It has never even occurred to me to try and clean the sink pipes. My mother would be appalled.

 

See also: Cleaning the ceiling, cleaning the outside of the boat, cleaning the oven, cleaning the shelves etc ad nauseam (literally).

 

I sweep the chimbly and service the engine though, so p'raps I can be forgiven :blush:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found this forum to be a very useful place for tips on good eco friendly washing up liquids, shampoos and conditioners, shower gels, soaps and laundry detergents. My favourite is our eco balls for the washing machine, which are ace.

 

Once you get used to the lack of foam with eco products, and the lack of a chemical fragrance, the quality is as good as chemical products.

 

 

Believe it or not, the "ece" products are chemicals too.

 

To a large extent, the whole eco detergent thing is a con. They really aren't significantly less polluting than brands that make no eco claims.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe it or not, the "ece" products are chemicals too.

 

To a large extent, the whole eco detergent thing is a con. They really aren't significantly less polluting than brands that make no eco claims.

 

I suspect you're right for many products. I have only gone as far as identifying certain types of products/chemicals that are the 'worst' evils and trying to avoid those. I am able to live with the fact that I'm only reducing harm rather than completely avoiding it. At the dilution levels we're talking about I suspect it makes little difference. Using less is probably more important than what you use.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Ecover washing up liquid for everything. It makes excellent body wash and shampoo and isn't bad for washing your undies either. Useful to know when storage space is at a premium.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Ecover washing up liquid for everything. It makes excellent body wash and shampoo and isn't bad for washing your undies either. Useful to know when storage space is at a premium.

 

But is it quantifiably better for the environment in relation to its cleaning capability than (say) Fairy Liquid,

 

I'm fairly convinced that per sink-load effectively washed, there would be no difference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But is it quantifiably better for the environment in relation to its cleaning capability than (say) Fairy Liquid,

 

I'm fairly convinced that per sink-load effectively washed, there would be no difference.

I don't know, but it smells nicer and Fairy Liquid leaves my hair sticky.

 

Actually, I think it probably does have less impact and less toxicity, although in the quantities boaters use the effects are likely to be marginal. Reading the indredients on Ecover though and on standard shower gel/shampoo, I know what I'd rather be putting on my skin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know, but it smells nicer and Fairy Liquid leaves my hair sticky.

 

Actually, I think it probably does have less impact and less toxicity, although in the quantities boaters use the effects are likely to be marginal. Reading the indredients on Ecover though and on standard shower gel/shampoo, I know what I'd rather be putting on my skin.

 

We use Ecover too. They do a very nice shower creme (for when you have the space!).

 

:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Evidently during ww2 Everyone had use little water,so

People were and some did so my mum told me, First of all do your washing in gas boiler then.

Then the washing up then a wash or bath and finally to flush the loo or water the garden.

Also we had a thing called a pig bin provided by the counsil to empty any left over food into to feed the pigs

they emptied it when they emptied the dustbin.

They never came and reposessed it after the war,so i just remember it as a kid.

bizzard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Evidently during ww2 Everyone had use little water,so

People were and some did so my mum told me, First of all do your washing in gas boiler then.

Then the washing up then a wash or bath and finally to flush the loo or water the garden.

Also we had a thing called a pig bin provided by the counsil to empty any left over food into to feed the pigs

they emptied it when they emptied the dustbin.

They never came and reposessed it after the war,so i just remember it as a kid.

bizzard.

No flush toilets in our part of the world in WW2, lots of people kept there own pig if they had a bit of land. Even when I was at work in 1970 one of the chaps kept pigs and had a lot of swill bins about which he collected regularly. Come Christmas the people who filled the bins got a joint of pork as a Christmas box from him.

I can't remember when they did away with swill, something to do with disease transmission. O and you also bathed in rotation, cleanest first.

 

Edit 2001 to stop foot and mouth

Edited by ditchcrawler
Link to post
Share on other sites

No flush toilets in our part of the world in WW2, lots of people kept there own pig if they had a bit of land. Even when I was at work in 1970 one of the chaps kept pigs and had a lot of swill bins about which he collected regularly. Come Christmas the people who filled the bins got a joint of pork as a Christmas box from him.

I can't remember when they did away with swill, something to do with disease transmission. O and you also bathed in rotation, cleanest first.

 

Edit 2001 to stop foot and mouth

We were given a counsil owned pre-fab directly after the war,it was lovely,all mod cons,flush toilet,fridge,electric cooker,heating stove. I believe everyone used washing soda to do their washing as there was no powder about if any.That was where the pig bin was.

regards bizzard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can now wash my entire self - except, sadly, for hair - in one handbowl of water (less than half a bucket). Ironic really as we have massive fresh water tanks, just no mechanism for wasting it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can now wash my entire self - except, sadly, for hair - in one handbowl of water (less than half a bucket). Ironic really as we have massive fresh water tanks, just no mechanism for wasting it.

Next to a Hotel pair you must have the most fresh water capacity on the cut. Maybe if you paint them black you could pump hot water straight to a shower/hose

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.