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Bench seat for stern


Philip

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2 hours ago, dixi188 said:

On the subject of being injured by the tiller when going forwards. I have never considered it as a problem. In reverse yes, and I always stand forward of the tiller arc.

The amount of rudder forward of the hinge line is very small so if something hits it the lever arm to deflect the rudder is very small compared to the lever arm of the tiller. 

Also anything hitting the rudder has to get through or round the prop first so I don't think anything very big could hit it. (I have had a log stop the prop though).

I can't find a photo of my rudder at the moment.

Am I being stupid to be in the tiller arc going forward?

(8years of ownership and a number of years of hiring beforethat).

Not at all stupid in my view.

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I didnt realise this boat steering thingy was so dangerous.

Not sure whether to remove my seat or the tiller itself now ?

 

Could get one of them there tractor seats fixed up high I suppose.

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18 minutes ago, MarkH2159 said:

I didnt realise this boat steering thingy was so dangerous.

Not sure whether to remove my seat or the tiller itself now ?

 

Could get one of them there tractor seats fixed up high I suppose.

But then you'd bump your head on the bridges.

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3 hours ago, dixi188 said:

On the subject of being injured by the tiller when going forwards. I have never considered it as a problem. In reverse yes, and I always stand forward of the tiller arc.

The amount of rudder forward of the hinge line is very small so if something hits it the lever arm to deflect the rudder is very small compared to the lever arm of the tiller. 

Also anything hitting the rudder has to get through or round the prop first so I don't think anything very big could hit it. (I have had a log stop the prop though).

I can't find a photo of my rudder at the moment.

Am I being stupid to be in the tiller arc going forward?

(8years of ownership and a number of years of hiring beforethat).

 

In 48 years of boating, I have once had the tiller wrenched from my grasp (I always stand forward of the tiller) whilst going forward.

 

I suspect I ran over a submerged oil drum or simular, as the boat rose and then fell, but as the stern went over it, whatever it was caught the rudder and forced the tiller across hard. If I had been standing next to it I would probably have been pushed into the cut.

Edited by cuthound
Spillung
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18 hours ago, Philip said:

Doing a lot of single-handed boating, it is nice to have something comfy to sit on for a bit, whilst navigating long pounds. 

 

Just make sure you're standing forward of the tiller arc when you're going astern.

3 hours ago, dixi188 said:

 

Am I being stupid to be in the tiller arc going forward?

(8years of ownership and a number of years of hiring beforethat).

 

Not so much of an issue in forward as long as you remember to get up and stand forward of the tiller arc when you go into astern. Trouble is it's very easy to forget. 

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  • 1 month later...

This is my new captains chair. The height is adjusted so that the tiller just clears it and I can undo wing nuts underneath to take the chair of the mounting and bring it inside rather than leaving it out in the rain.

 

The double pallets are strapped together with big cable ties. I need the pallets for extra height as I suffer from shortallus so when I'm approaching a bridge or a lock I can just step of the chair and stand up and it gives me a much better perspective.

 

I don't think the suicide seat thing is really an issue unless one is reversing, in which case I'm standing up forward of the tiller anyway to get a better view of the bow.

 

 

IMG_20210610_075845.jpg

 

 

IMG_20210610_075902.jpg

Edited by blackrose
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I've mentioned this before on the forum.  Don't underestimate the danger of being swept off the boat by the tiller.  I've seen it happen and the person wasn't sitting down, but standing within the arc of the tiller.

The safest and most confortable way - although this isn't any use to the OP - is to stand on the step of a tradtitional boat and, when you want a rest, to sit on the roof with the legs dangling in the opening.

 

Edited by koukouvagia
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1 hour ago, koukouvagia said:

I've mentioned this before on the forum.  Don't underestimate the danger of being swept off the boat by the tiller.  I've seen it happen and the person wasn't sitting down, but standing within the arc of the tiller.

The safest and most comfortable way - although this isn't any use to the OP - is to stand on the step of a traditional boat and, when you want a rest, to sit on the roof with the legs dangling in the opening.

 

Alice Collins. picture from CRT Archive.

Alice Collins (2).jpg

 

 

This, below, is not really a good idea. :captain:

 

Steam Boat Jason.jpg

Edited by Ray T
  • Greenie 1
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7 minutes ago, David Mack said:

And even less of a good idea on a certain aqueduct!

march03048.jpg

My legs have gone jelloid at the very thought. I'm fine with heights as long as I can't see a vertical drop. Thinking back many years, going up into the dome of the Sacré Coeur was pretty damned fraught.

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I'm rubbish with heights too. A few years ago I had a bad attack of vertigo at the top of the Sagrada Familia tower staircase in Barcelona. I had to inch my way down on my bottom, helped by a kindly retired doctor and his wife. There was a great queue behind by the time I finally got down. My legs were then so wobbly I had to sit on the floor for half an hour. Very embarrassing!

Edited by MrsM
  • Greenie 1
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