Jump to content

Gas keeps going off


Featured Posts

Just now, nicknorman said:

No sorry that would be counter-productive for the cylinder at least. When the liquid “gas” boils/evaporates to replace the gas drawn off, it absorbs quite a lot of heat. Latent heat of evaporation etc. If the cylinder is insulated that heat cannot be drawn from outside, the cylinder temperature will plummet and gas will stop coming out.

 

A long, but comprehensive version of my comment!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

A long, but comprehensive version of my comment!

And now even longer! I think people imagine that wrapping things up in insulation helps to keep them warm. This does of course work for humans and warm blooded animals because they have their own internal heat source and the insulation stops that being lost. But in the case eg of water pipes, insulation doesn’t keep them warm, it just slows down the rate of cooling so you need longer with ambient temperature below freezing before the water freezes.

  • Greenie 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, nicknorman said:

And now even longer! I think people imagine that wrapping things up in insulation helps to keep them warm. This does of course work for humans and warm blooded animals because they have their own internal heat source and the insulation stops that being lost. But in the case eg of water pipes, insulation doesn’t keep them warm, it just slows down the rate of cooling so you need longer with ambient temperature below freezing before the water freezes.

I just knew it might be  a silly suggestion 🙂 . Thank you both for your explanations. In my innocence I just thought stopping the really cold air getting to the cylinder might slow down the freezing!

I'll crawl back into my kennel now!

 

haggis

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

And now even longer! I think people imagine that wrapping things up in insulation helps to keep them warm. This does of course work for humans and warm blooded animals because they have their own internal heat source and the insulation stops that being lost. But in the case eg of water pipes, insulation doesn’t keep them warm, it just slows down the rate of cooling so you need longer with ambient temperature below freezing before the water freezes.

A bit like going out last thing at night, opening the bonnet of the car and laying a blanket over the engine to keep it warm.

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Are they the same people who complain when you leave a door open and let the cold in?

They are the same people who actualy think that 4 wheel drive vehicles dont skid on icy surfaces :o You may find that hard to believe but many drivers think 4 wheel drive means no skidding.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

They are the same people who actualy think that 4 wheel drive vehicles dont skid on icy surfaces :o You may find that hard to believe but many drivers think 4 wheel drive means no skidding.

 

 

I managed to persuade the boss to let me have a 4WD vehicle as a company car (well I needed it for launching the boat on the beach), Car delivered and as part of the sale I was given a 'one day course' on off-roading in an old quarry - amazing what it would do !!!

 

Anyway the following week it snowed heavily roads blocked etc etc so I decided to visit one of our branches at Aldridge.

The roads thru the industrial estate were compacted to ice but I kept going until I got to a hump-backed bridge over the canal - it was very 'polished' due to the number of cars that hadn't made it up but I got 'up and over' and then noticed a milk float sideways across the road with a couple of huge RSJ's on the back. It was going nowhere. I then slid sideways into the milk float and the RSJ went thru the rear door and across the rear seat.

 

I didn't half get 'some stick' when I got back to the Manchester office "got a 4WD, trained how to drive it, 1st time a bit of snow and you crash it."

 

Without studs nothing grips on ice !

  • Greenie 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

They are the same people who actualy think that 4 wheel drive vehicles dont skid on icy surfaces :o You may find that hard to believe but many drivers think 4 wheel drive means no skidding.

 

Even 2WD vehicles don't skid if the driver adapts to the conditions. This may include fitting studded tyres.

You have to work with the ABS and ESP, though. It helps to know how they operate!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My Subaru Legacys were both 4WD with limited slip diffs all round. Never had any problem with “going”, fantastic traction. But the “stopping” was exactly the same as any other car.

 

By contrast my current a skoda Superb, with its Haldex 4x4 system, is only marginally better than 2wd in snow and ice. No limited slip, only traction control. There is more than one flavour of four wheel drive

Edited by nicknorman
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Even 2WD vehicles don't skid if the driver adapts to the conditions. This may include fitting studded tyres.

You have to work with the ABS and ESP, though. It helps to know how they operate!

 

If you knew the Colne Valley area of Huddersfield I think you would modify your opinion.

In the past week there have been 12 wrecked or badly damaged cars due to sliding off the road due to iceThis is on a particularly steep and twisty hill.The local rag has opined that people are following their satnav blindly.

The locals avoid this and other tricky roads in bad weather.

The superior driver uses superior judgement to avoid situations that require the use of his superior skill.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

The superior driver uses superior judgement to avoid situations that require the use of his superior skill.

 

In what way is that strategy not included in my "if the driver adapts to the conditions"?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

If you knew the Colne Valley area of Huddersfield I think you would modify your opinion.

In the past week there have been 12 wrecked or badly damaged cars due to sliding off the road due to iceThis is on a particularly steep and twisty hill.The local rag has opined that people are following their satnav blindly.

The locals avoid this and other tricky roads in bad weather.

The superior driver uses superior judgement to avoid situations that require the use of his superior skill.

 

theres a lovely video of one of the tractors from Bolster Moor farm dragging a stricken Audi off said hill, on its side, for a few hundred metres. a bit of snow and all sense goes out the window.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

My Subaru Legacys were both 4WD with limited slip diffs all round. Never had any problem with “going”, fantastic traction. But the “stopping” was exactly the same as any other car.

 

By contrast my current a skoda Superb, with its Haldex 4x4 system, is only marginally better than 2wd in snow and ice. No limited slip, only traction control. There is more than one flavour of four wheel drive

we used to run one of the old range rovers (classic model before they started fitting airbag suspension etc) and that thing was damn near perfect in the snow (moved and stopped perfectly) as long as you knew how to drive it, we let someone else drive it in the snow and they decided that snow meant kicking in all of the diff locks which worked perfectly until they tried to turn the first corner and they very gracefully pirouetted down the road, the difflocks had forced 3 wheels to slip when they turned, once 3 wheels were sliding on ice & snow the 4th had no chance.

 

To bring things back on topic, the range rover was lpg converted, any temperatures below -5 could freeze the regulator (or evaporator) if you were heavy footed before the engine was fully up to temperature, this showed up as stalling the engine. and temps of -10 or below would freeze the gas tank with use (gradual loss of power until you were reduced to a very rough misfiring tickover).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.