Jump to content

Throwline


Bob692

Featured Posts

12 minutes ago, Bob692 said:

Can you have a throwline instead of a life ring/buoy? and keep within the rules. 

 

My Catamaran is in Plymouth, lovely place.

 

 

There are no rules.

The Boat safety scheme is about the safety of "passers by" NOT the people on your boat.

 

So, you can have, nothing, a 'ring' or a throw-line, or horse-shoes its your choice.

 

(I have a throw line, but on the canal when the person in trouble is only 10 foot away from you and in 3 feet of water you could throw then a 'ring' or poke them with your 'barge-pole').

Edited by Alan de Enfield
  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, pearley said:

Ditto too.

 

But, practice with it before you need it for real.

Thank you, I used to sail offshore and used these as well as soft horse shoe “rings” during numerous training sessions to obtain my offshore qualifications. Personally I was never happy with a hard plastic ring. I know the chance is small but misjudge throwing a ring could hurt a “MOB.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Bob692 said:

Can you have a throwline instead of a life ring/buoy? and keep within the rules. 

As well as making sure you practice throwing it, also make sure you practice re-throwing it once you miss the first time. If it's a drowning situation you don't have time to re-stuff the bag. Some throwlines you can fill the empty bag with water and use that as the weighted end to re-throw, in the Coastguard we practice with making flat coils over the hand and throwing that, which is more difficult.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Bob692 said:

Can you have a throwline instead of a life ring/buoy? and keep within the rules. 

Rather than keeping within the rules, I think it’s a question of how to preserve life.

 

A few years ago my wife slipped on wet moss at the tail end of a lock while re-boarding at the back of the boat.

 

This was on the gentle staffs & Worcs canal.

 

She went into the water, the boat had momentum and we were moving away from her. I threw a mooring line to her, which was the first thing to hand. but that tangled around her legs. I kept a soft horseshoe life-ring, with a line attached, on the seating in the boatman cabin, I threw that to her, which she was able to hug, which kept her afloat while I stopped the boat and pulled her to the side of the canal.

 

Then, it was quite an effort to get her over the Armco and onto the towpath.

 

After that I carried an old ladder that could be used to get out of the canal. I also carried a roll-up ladder (with stake to security in the bank).

 

First thing every morning I made sure the lifebelt was in place and the line ready.

 

I[‘m sure the lifebelt saved her life.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, arbutus said:

 

 

I threw a mooring line to her, which was the first thing to hand. but that tangled around her legs.

Maybe time to change to rope that will float - added benefit is less chance (unfortunately not no chance) of it going round the prop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Big Bob W said:

A rigid life "ring" can also be used to provide a buffer between the boat and lock wall should someone end up in the water in a lock.  Drop it over the side to prevent the casualty getting crushed.

I tried using mine once to hold the boat away from some steel pilling (big bolt sticking out), this is where I discovered the life ring is made with a fairly brittle thin plastic skin full of foam to give it shape, and it cracks & splits when ‘crushed’.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Chewbacka said:

I tried using mine once to hold the boat away from some steel pilling (big bolt sticking out), this is where I discovered the life ring is made with a fairly brittle thin plastic skin full of foam to give it shape, and it cracks & splits when ‘crushed’.

And, when they have been left on the roof in the Sun for a few years they become brittle and break up. They should be stored undercover, or replaced on a regular basis.

 

This is why (unless they have been vandalised) they are kept in 'covers' at the waterside.

 

images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcTBIDEnBm32WeAohc98N0xXVJ2Vh-0sqrsW3l02MY9mWG5hIJvTDLdb5Evaw0Y&usqp=CAc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 04/11/2020 at 18:37, Bob692 said:

Can you have a throwline instead of a life ring/buoy? and keep within the rules. 

As a private owner there is no compulsion for you to have any sort of 'rescue' device on board as others have said.

 

Things of course are different for passenger boats which must have them and IIRC hire boats too are required to have them by the licence conditions for hire boats.

 

(happy to be corrected on the latter point if somebody knows different)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.