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Rick Savery

Disconnecting gas cooker

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I have just bought a new cooker and want to clean behind the old one before installing. At the moment the old one is connected via a braided-metal sheathed hose, screwed onto copper both ends (no bayonet fitting).

I don't know if this is normal on boats, but quite happy either way. My question is it OK for me to unscreww the hose from the old cooker so I can move it out of the way?

Whilst I feel competent to reconnect the new cooker to this hose when ready, I will be getting a gas safe person to, at the very least, check for leaks when re-connected before turning the gas back on - preferably getting them to fit the cooker when ready. Do I need a gas safe person to change the jets? Is this someong one can do themselves or is it a pain and/or a risk?

 

Thanks for your help and advice

 

 Rick

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If it were me, I'd be happy to unscrew the old fitting (after disconnecting the gas at the cylinder, not just turning it off) but I'd want a "man who can" to reconnect the new one. At least, that's what I did with mine five years ago.

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That's a good point, hadn't thought of that. It's turned off at the cylinder and there is an in-line valve next to where the hose connects that is also off, but I shall disconnect from the cylinders before I unscrew the hose. Thanks 

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I'd suggest lighting a burner on the cooker first. 
Then (leaving burner on) turn off gas valve. The gas in the line will burn off. 
Once the burner has gone out, disconnect the gas cylinder.

 

NOW you can undo the connections to the cooker.

 

If you don't do this, quite a bit of gas will leak when you disconnect the cooker. Not enough to be dangerous, but it will stink. 

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11 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

If it were me, I'd be happy to unscrew the old fitting (after disconnecting the gas at the cylinder, not just turning it off) but I'd want a "man who can" to reconnect the new one. At least, that's what I did with mine five years ago.

agreed 

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It's a doddle job as is changing the jets, took me 10 minutes to change on my present cooker. A small set of sockets will help.

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3 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

It's a doddle job as is changing the jets, took me 10 minutes to change on my present cooker. A small set of sockets will help.

Easy to say, I have seen some peoples attempt at fitting a 13 amp plug top, some people seem allergic to tools but have numerous other skills.

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16 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Easy to say, I have seen some peoples attempt at fitting a 13 amp plug top, some people seem allergic to tools but have numerous other skills.

You are correct. My best mate of many years standing who is a senior professor of music and world renowned in his field literally cannot change a plug or indeed check the level of oil in his car engine!! 

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24 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

You are correct. My best mate of many years standing who is a senior professor of music and world renowned in his field literally cannot change a plug or indeed check the level of oil in his car engine!! 

I know of at least 3 people like that

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Have a look at the flexible hose.  It should have a date of manufacture on it.  If it is more than 5 years ago it would be wise to change it as they do not last forever and become more permeable with age.  If there is no date  change it anyway.  Replacements are in decent chandlers and one the same length with the same size pipe at the  ends will be fine.

If changing the hose disconnect the existing cooker at the pipe end of the flexible and get your gas man to start from there.

 

N

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This is only personal mind. I'd disconnect it with bottles turned off, do the cleaning job and connect the new one. Gas on, leak test with soapy water and call the job done. There's nothing in the job that requires specialist knowledge and the spanners work the same as on any other job. 

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Unless you are a liveaboard you are at liberty to do this job yourself as Sir N says.  Leak testing the joints is critical and you can get proper leak detection fluid for peanuts from screwfix.

 

Personally I will not let any gas safe person not personally known to me anywhere near any of my gas installations as I have had very bad experiences from gas safe people who were anything but ....

 

I'd recommend only using gas safe bods that someone you trust recommends from personal experience. 

Edited by jonathanA

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37 minutes ago, jonathanA said:

I have had very bad experiences from gas safe people who were anything but ....

Me too. Okay, only a single experience, but it was enough for me to say ‘never again’. 

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Thanks BEngo for the advice about the date of the hose - I will certainly look into that when I come to do the job.

 

And thanks to everyone else who has given me advice on this - I can confirm that 13amp plugs are a doddle 🙂 Working with gas always gives me the willies, I have heard horror stories about gas problems and I'd rather avoid if possible. Having said that, I am quite happy, after your collected input, to disconnect, change the jets and possibly even re-connect and leak test.

I just assume that if someone is registered as gas safe then everything should be fine - but now I will try and get someone who is known to the marina or the few people I know in the area to do the final check rather than getting an unknown quantity.

 

Thanks again

 

Rick

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As a liveaboard, if you consider yourself competent, there is no reason not to do it your self. There is some aspect of the BSS that requires a liveaboard boat to be drop tested, which requires an examiner to be Gas Safe, but on a 'cruising boat' that is not, for some reason, a requirement.

It is good advice re the hose. If it has been installed for some time. It will have got hot in use, and they go less flexible.

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44 minutes ago, Ex Brummie said:

As a liveaboard, if you consider yourself competent, there is no reason not to do it your self. There is some aspect of the BSS that requires a liveaboard boat to be drop tested, which requires an examiner to be Gas Safe, but on a 'cruising boat' that is not, for some reason, a requirement.

 

If the boat is a "dwellingplace" ie a liveaboard boat, it comes under the GSIUR regulations which would make it an offence for a non-Gas Safe BSS examiner to do any "work" including removing and refitting a test point.  Any examiner can do the gas test using an already fitted bubble tester though.

 

It's not a BSS requirement, it's the "proper" gas safety regulations.  They probably ought to apply to leisure boats as well, but they don't as written.

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18 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

It's not a BSS requirement, it's the "proper" gas safety regulations.  They probably ought to apply to leisure boats as well, but they don't as written.

Thank God and long may it continue 

We can do without more nanny state in our lives. 

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This may be an embarrassing adjunct to my original question - I have disconnected the cylinders and the hose from the old cooker. Couldn't find the lpg jets for the new cooker. Wasn't sure if they were supposed to come with or were an extra. Emailed supplier who has responded that the cooker is already set up for LPG with a suitable regulator.

This is the silly bit: by 'suitable regulator' I assume this is the one in the gas locker that accepts feeds for both cylinders? Also, and I know it's obvious but I'd rather be thought an idiot than blown up :-), 'already set up for LPG' means that the right jets are already installed?

I think I am going to hide behind the sofa when replies come in for this one

Thank you

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3 minutes ago, Rick Savery said:

This may be an embarrassing adjunct to my original question - I have disconnected the cylinders and the hose from the old cooker. Couldn't find the lpg jets for the new cooker. Wasn't sure if they were supposed to come with or were an extra. Emailed supplier who has responded that the cooker is already set up for LPG with a suitable regulator.

This is the silly bit: by 'suitable regulator' I assume this is the one in the gas locker that accepts feeds for both cylinders? Also, and I know it's obvious but I'd rather be thought an idiot than blown up :-), 'already set up for LPG' means that the right jets are already installed?

I think I am going to hide behind the sofa when replies come in for this one

Thank you

 

Who did you buy it from and what make/model is it?

 

If it has already been converted, then it should be fine BUT it should also have a sticker on it somewhere saying it's jetted for LPG use.  If it's an LPG only model then it will be fine.

 

 

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It is a Statesman legacy 50GSLF, although website shows the model as 50LPG - actually, I had never considered the fact that the model number is a big clue! 🙂 - bought from Midland Chandlers.

The datasheet talks about LPG conversion kit included but I couldn't find it, hence my question. I will look for the sticker but the model number implies it is already set up correctly for LPG ?  How stupid do I feel ? !

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2 minutes ago, Rick Savery said:

It is a Statesman legacy 50GSLF, although website shows the model as 50LPG - actually, I had never considered the fact that the model number is a big clue! 🙂 - bought from Midland Chandlers.

The datasheet talks about LPG conversion kit included but I couldn't find it, hence my question. I will look for the sticker but the model number implies it is already set up correctly for LPG ?  How stupid do I feel ? !

 

Better safe than sorry!  Yeah, that one is already set up for LPG, and yes the "suitable regulator" is the one in the gas locker.

 

They have to be a bit vague as the "suitable" regulator depends on the type of gas and the type of bottle.

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Thanks TheBiscuits and Ex Brummie for your help, really appreciate it. The potential of gas problems really gives me the willies so I'd rather ask an obvious question than assume and get it wrong.

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