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12v or 230/240v fridge?


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We're looking at fridges and 12v ones are just so expensive so we're considering a 240v one.  I've heard that new fridges are more energy efficient than old ones and can be run off batteries, I'm not sure how true this is.

 

We plan to be moored up with hookup 5 days a week and cruising at the weekends (so that we're not in the marina too many hours a week), what would you recommend? We haven't yet installed our inverter/battery setup so we can adjust this to what's needed.

 

Thanks in advance! 

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As long as its a quality inverter that uses a low current to work itself and most importantly can provide the high starting surge a fridge demands I think that given your stated boat use a mains fridge will be fine. Especially if you also have a mains battery charger in use when you are in the marina so your batteries are always well charged.

 

Edited to add - make sure its an A+ or A++ rated fridge. Cheap ones often have a very poor rating.

Edited by Tony Brooks
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8 minutes ago, system 4-50 said:

A common question.  If you want a quick answer you may find the excellent forum search function useful. If you are happy to wait then the regulars may respond shortly.  :)

I would say in your case 240 volt as you will have mains available 5 days out of 7. I have a Mastervolt True Sine inverter and it was drawing 0.6 amps when I switched it of, it was only powering the laptop and MiFi. Take care if anyone recommends an inverter set to power saving as modern electronically controlled fridges may not start it up.

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27 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I have a Mastervolt True Sine inverter and it was drawing 0.6 amps when I switched it off

0.6A is quite a low quiescent current, as you would expect from Mastervolt - an overhead of only about 15Ah per day.

 

My Sterling draws 4A, so nearly 100Ah per day. I turn it on only when needed - it’s become an irritant! 
 

If I had yours, I would leave it on 24/7, consider a 240V fridge, (if they make them small enough), and stop searching for DC powered stuff when I buy a new gizmo.

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Look at the no load current in the specifications, there can be huge differences, Victron's up to about 2000 Watts are under 1 amp but the 3000 is around 2 amps, a big difference 24 hours a day. Rumour has the new mastervolt 3000 is almost 4 amps but I havn't checked (misprint on spec or what, the old one was under 1 amp)  Some older Sterlings are 4.6 amps my friend has one but as he has a 12volt fridge his inverter is rarely on for long.

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3 minutes ago, Ex Brummie said:

How does the cost of a 12 volt fridge compare with the cost of an efficient 240 volt fridge and an economical inverter with the capability of running the fridge?

12 volt fridge around 500 quid 240 volt fridge same size around 110 quid. running power use very similar, so inverter losses are the big difference.  I summer use boat with 400 watts or so of solar has no extra costs as the solar will fill his batteries every day. Totally different in December and January where you could be paying 2+ quid a day on fuel to charge the batteries. 

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14 minutes ago, katie_hannah said:

Thanks for your advice everyone! Do you think that a Victron Inverter Charger would be a good inverter to choose?

I (and many others) would recommend that you do not buy a 'combi' (Inverter and battery charger) when one breaks down (it will) then you loose both part of the device.

 

Buy an Inverter, and buy a battery charger, 2 separate devices.

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17 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I (and many others) would recommend that you do not buy a 'combi' (Inverter and battery charger) when one breaks down (it will) then you loose both part of the device.

 

Buy an Inverter, and buy a battery charger, 2 separate devices.

Agreed. I must admit that I have a combi that works faultlessly at present, however it was fitted from new and I would never fit a combi they make zero sense. My combi WILL fail at some time leaving me without leccy or charging.

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As wot everyone above has said (in general).

BUT

BUT

But mahe sure in the first place that you have adequate battery CAPACITY to run whatever you finally settle for. That means (and I'll stick with it) at least 4, that's FOUR 12v 110Ah (or better batteries) AND an alternator charge controller to go with it.

 

It's no use snivelling that everything is undersized later when you complain that the batteries are dead, or the fridge doesn't - umm fridge.

Having a bad day here - folks put in huge TVs and all sorts of gadgets ('cos that's what's cool today), but ignore the problem of provisioning what folks consider reasonable living in 20020.

Living on a boat can be inexpensive, relative to bricks and mortar living, but needs to be tuned to make life reasonably comfortable.

The alternative is to wear a hair shirt and -P in a bucket.

 

Folks need to get real.....

 

(bad evening with internet conection for the boat)

 

 

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2 hours ago, Richard10002 said:

0.6A is quite a low quiescent current, as you would expect from Mastervolt - an overhead of only about 15Ah per day.

 

My Sterling draws 4A, so nearly 100Ah per day. I turn it on only when needed - it’s become an irritant! 
 

If I had yours, I would leave it on 24/7, consider a 240V fridge, (if they make them small enough), and stop searching for DC powered stuff when I buy a new gizmo.

That is what I have

 

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