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Speeding Boat, Best Excuse

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7 minutes ago, JamesFrance said:

I would never leave a boat unattended on pins

 

Why not?  I'm not being argumentative, I'm genuinely curious.

 

More and more boaters seem unable or unwilling to stop anywhere other than a signposted visitor mooring with rings or bollards.  Some will use armco with chains or nappy pins if needed, but by no means all of them.

 

I suppose it leaves all the rest of the towpath for me to use, so I can't complain!

 

 

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4 hours ago, haza said:

we have always slowed down when passing boats  be it one on its own or  20 ,going past one near kinver .slow down you ffing ugly bitch i will pull your f--king head off if i could get to you you ffing bast-- d-two weeks later on the llangollen  ,i heard slow down you ffing ugly bitch and all the rest of it .were upon mr pulled over went and knocked on this guys boat to see what is problem was .he would not come out or even open is doors .found out later ,this guy is well known for doing this .seems he as nothing better to do ,as any one else come across this guy i was told ,  he is pissed most of the time 

He needed reporting to the police. They'll probably know him.

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1 minute ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

Why not?  I'm not being argumentative, I'm genuinely curious.

 

More and more boaters seem unable or unwilling to stop anywhere other than a signposted visitor mooring with rings or bollards.  Some will use armco with chains or nappy pins if needed, but by no means all of them.

 

I suppose it leaves all the rest of the towpath for me to use, so I can't complain!

 

 

Just that tying to something secure will always be better and no shortage of piling to secure to in most areas, but being over 80 I am probably more nervous than I used to be and more inclined to look for possible problems.

  • Greenie 1

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15 minutes ago, JamesFrance said:

No, I was just curious to read the replies, I would never leave a boat unattended on pins, but think that passing moored boats at speed is inconsiderate and their owners should not be blamed for their own incompetence when they say so.

This is not a binary issue, it depends on what you mean by “at speed”. If “at speed” means 4mph then I’d agree with you. But some people’s idea of “at speed” means anything that causes their badly moored boat to move a bit. Personally I think it is not inconsiderate to pass at a speed that causes no issues for the 90% of boats moored properly (and of course that speed will depend on the nature of the canal and the means by which the boats are tied up.) even if it may cause a fair bit of movement for the 10% of boats with 3’ slack in their 90 degree lines. Otherwise we have to dumb down to the lowest common denominator, the most incompetent people, and I don’t subscribe to that philosophy.

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Tying a boat up on a canal is very simple, much more interesting is securing a keelboat in a drying harbour so that it does not topple over when the tide goes out, something I was first faced with when exiting the Canal du Midi 50 years ago at Bordeaux and finding the harbour at Royan full of small plywood yachts not shown in the pilot book, leaving drying out on the end wall as the only option as the water level dropped.

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1 hour ago, Mike Todd said:

I'm a little unclear of the physics behind the idea that increased diameter to the pins makes for a better mooring.

 

The main reason, as far as I experience it, for a pin mooring coming adrift is that the pin is pulled sideways in soft ground until it is unable to offer any frictional resistance to being pulled out - which only happens once the pin is quite much closer to being in line with the rope. OK, so an increase circumference will mean greater friction but is it that much of a difference? If the ground is soft enough for the pin to be pulled sideways then it is going to come out anyway.

 

It always intrigues me that often, even when the pin has not shifted at all overnight, it can still be removed easily by pulling on it along the line of the pin. What is important. above all other factors, is to make sure that the pin is aligned at 90 deg to the line of the rope (usually means at an angle, and that the rope is attached to the pin as close to the ground as possible (I'm not sure that burying it adds much - but it can make it less of an obstacle)

 

I know that practical experience is king when oit comes to matters of boating, but just occasionally it comforts me to see it backed up by science (Yes, I know that it can also be a smokescreen!)

 

Being guided by scientific evidence. Get bigger pins and an even bigger hammer 🔨⚒️😁

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3 hours ago, JamesFrance said:

Could someone please explain how to tie a boat up properly when there are no rings bollards or piling available?  

To start with do not use the knitting needles that many seem to use as 'pins', get some proper 4' long12mm steel bars with a ring welded onto them a couple of inches from the top.

 

galvanised_mooring_spikes.jpg

 

 

Knock one into the ground at approximately a 30 degree angle parallel with the boat and approximately 45 degrees ahead of the boat. Put the second spike thru the ring of the first and Knock the second spike in at about a 30 degree angle such then when they are both knocked in leaving a maximum of 12" above ground they form a V

 

Take another two stakes and do the same, placing them at an angle of 45 degrees behind the stern of the boat.

 

Run a line from bow cleat / T-Stud thru the ring on the 'front pins' and back to the bow cleat / T-Stud. Ties off

Do the same with the rear pins to the rear cleat / dolly.

 

Now take a line from your bow cleat / T-stud and attach it the the rear pins leaving it fairly loose, 

Now take a line from the rear cleat / dolly and take it forward to the forward pins, tie it off leaving it fairly loose.

 

You now are attached Bow and stern and have two spring lines as well.

 

 

Sailtrain: Anchoring and mooring, Mooring alongside.

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8 hours ago, nicknorman said:

 

Frangar makes a habit of trawling through the forum looking for opportunities to snipe at me. Less so recently, but for some reason he doesn’t like me even though we’ve never met, and he tries not to miss an opportunity to let me know it.

Please don’t flatter yourself. I’ve much better things to do....you seem to be becoming paranoid for some reason...I would have made the same comment to anyone who said they had to go at a certain speed to allow a bit of kit to work. Just seems a very poor design to me. 

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8 minutes ago, frangar said:

Please don’t flatter yourself. I’ve much better things to do....you seem to be becoming paranoid for some reason...I would have made the same comment to anyone who said they had to go at a certain speed to allow a bit of kit to work. Just seems a very poor design to me. 

Except that that wasn’t what I said. The Travelpower is quite capable of producing 2kw at idle.

 

Anyway your argument reminds me of a shouter a few years ago. He said (shouted) “Slow down!”. I said “we are at tickover” so he grumped “Well you need to get a smaller prop then!”. So clearly our boat is not fit for purpose in that it can’t go slow enough to satisfy the most incompetent moorers. I’ll put it up for sale and buy a pedalo I think.

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23 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

To start with do not use the knitting needles that many seem to use as 'pins', get some proper 4' long12mm steel bars with a ring welded onto them a couple of inches from the top.

 

galvanised_mooring_spikes.jpg

 

 

Knock one into the ground at approximately a 30 degree angle parallel with the boat and approximately 45 degrees ahead of the boat. Put the second spike thru the ring of the first and Knock the second spike in at about a 30 degree angle such then when they are both knocked in leaving a maximum of 12" above ground they form a V

 

Take another two stakes and do the same, placing them at an angle of 45 degrees behind the stern of the boat.

 

Run a line from bow cleat / T-Stud thru the ring on the 'front pins' and back to the bow cleat / T-Stud. Ties off

Do the same with the rear pins to the rear cleat / dolly.

 

Now take a line from your bow cleat / T-stud and attach it the the rear pins leaving it fairly loose, 

Now take a line from the rear cleat / dolly and take it forward to the forward pins, tie it off leaving it fairly loose.

 

You now are attached Bow and stern and have two spring lines as well.

 

 

Sailtrain: Anchoring and mooring, Mooring alongside.

Unfortunately most boats have a cabin on them which would prevent the spring lines being attached like your drawing. Canal boats are often a totally different shape too.

For a spring line you need a center attachment point on the gunwale, not the roof for obvious reasons.

In the absence of such a mounting I put a spring on the offboard stern dolly but the bow end is not so easy, a spring line back to a mid mooring point will rub the cratch.

TD.

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4 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Unfortunately most boats have a cabin on them which would prevent the spring lines being attached like your drawing. Canal boats are often a totally different shape too.

For a spring line you need a center attachment point on the gunwale, not the roof for obvious reasons.

In the absence of such a mounting I put a spring on the offboard stern dolly but the bow end is not so easy, a spring line back to a mid mooring point will rub the cratch.

TD.

Yes rubbing your cratch shouldn’t be done in public. Even with one spring from the stern, boat stability is much improved eg when moored to bollards or rings that are inevitably spaced wrongly for the boat.

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3 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Unfortunately most boats have a cabin on them which would prevent the spring lines being attached like your drawing. Canal boats are often a totally different shape too.

For a spring line you need a center attachment point on the gunwale, not the roof for obvious reasons.

In the absence of such a mounting I put a spring on the offboard stern dolly but the bow end is not so easy, a spring line back to a mid mooring point will rub the cratch.

I have found that most NB's are 'flat' alongside the bank and it is no problem to run a spring from bow to stern, it may touch the front corner of the cabin but if yiu have tied up properly to your 4-pins you shouldn't be needing a spring line - they are just belt and braces.

If you have a central mooring point (cleat) as we do then, yes, it is much easier (irrespective of the boat shape)

 

Mooring Up your Boat Securely - Jones Boatyard

 

Or you can even use 'short springs' using bow and stern cleats.

 

Mooring a Ship | Knowledge Of Sea

 

There is no simple 'catch all' method, but they can all be adapted to suit the circumstances.

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3 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

Yes rubbing your cratch shouldn’t be done in public. Even with one spring from the stern, boat stability is much improved eg when moored to bollards or rings that are inevitably spaced wrongly for the boat.

🙄  Stop peeping!!!!

Edited by Tracy D'arth

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Having pottered down the Shroppie again this year, the moorings at the bottom have definitely expanded since I was last there. They still drive me to distraction but as my wife was with me for once, I retired to the crossword and handed the tiller to her. She enjoyed the endless lines of boats. And some of the boatless bits are so gorgeous it makes up for it, anyway.

All in all, I don't really object to it being a car park, nor do I object to those who live on and don't move - people need to work, or maybe just like where they are. Everyone, as Robert Sheckley so wisely remarked, has their place in the stew. But I'm still not creeping past a mile of boats at tickover.

  • Horror 1

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so how does this canal boating work .if one as done all .or most of the canal system 20/30 times and there is not a lot more canal out there to do .and after it all do. you have to sell your boat, even tho you still love the canals and living on a boat . .or do you get your self a nice reso mooring and just watch the world go by.even the fast boats slow boats ugly boats very nice boats ,all i hear is that the boating community  is a very nice community ..what a load of tosh and bollo,,ks that is .i dont surpose any one would agree tho .i am hoping to get a reso on the shroppie soon moored boats or not its a loverly stretch of  canal . dont know abt the residents tho .not that i give a toss any way 

  • Greenie 1

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10 minutes ago, haza said:

so how does this canal boating work .if one as done all .or most of the canal system 20/30 times and there is not a lot more canal out there to do .and after it all do. you have to sell your boat, even tho you still love the canals and living on a boat . .or do you get your self a nice reso mooring and just watch the world go by.even the fast boats slow boats ugly boats very nice boats ,all i hear is that the boating community  is a very nice community ..what a load of tosh and bollo,,ks that is .i dont surpose any one would agree tho .i am hoping to get a reso on the shroppie soon moored boats or not its a loverly stretch of  canal . dont know abt the residents tho .not that i give a toss any way 

You tend to find that people's attitude generally reflects your own. As you don't give a toss, you will probably find that no-one else gives a toss sbout you either. So that's OK.

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yes that is fine live and let live i say .but many many others dont .

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so thats how this boating lark works then with attitude .every day is a school day 

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3 minutes ago, haza said:

so thats how this boating lark works then with attitude .every day is a school day 

Only with the bombastic arrogant know-it-alls, who always know better, always are right, always insist on telling you when they think you are wrong and who are a pain in the ar*e on here and everywhere else in the world.

Enjoy the Shroppie, welcome, you will be amongst friends, its a lovely canal with a vibrant population, moving or moored.

TD'

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yes tracy i now the shroppie very well .misters band use to play in the navigation a lot in the day loverly pub 

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28 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Only with the bombastic arrogant know-it-alls, who always know better, always are right, always insist on telling you when they think you are wrong ...

I think you are being a bit harsh on the “slow down” shouters. They can’t help being unable to tie their boats up properly. If I had medical training I’d probably know the technical name for that disability.

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2 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

I think you are being a bit harsh on the “slow down” shouters. They can’t help being unable to tie their boats up properly. If I had medical training I’d probably know the technical name for that disability.

And up pops Punch!

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maybe thick .just like there rope does it matter if it comes loose .tie it again .only better next time 

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6 hours ago, doratheexplorer said:

I'm currently moored on piling on the Ashby.  Loads of boats moving and my boat is rocking and clanking because my lines are loose.  I do have excuses for this:

 

1.  I'm too lazy to get up and tighten the lines.

2.  I quite like the rocking and clanking :D

I hope I didnt clank you when I came up there last week

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12 hours ago, Victor Vectis said:

I'm just wondering why a washing m/c let alone a tumble drier is needed on a narrowboat?

 

:unsure:

Because some of us like to launder our clothes and dry them , use of a tumble dryer means that clothes can come out folded and put away, no need to iron.

Phil

  • Greenie 1

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