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Transporting Coal


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15 minutes ago, Rose Narrowboats said:

Surprised no-one has mentioned Pooley Hall yet, or if you don't want to model the pithead but do want to run a Garratt, Baddesley!

Post #4.

 

N

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  52 minutes ago, Rose Narrowboats said:

"Surprised no-one has mentioned Pooley Hall yet, or if you don't want to model the pithead but do want to run a Garratt, Baddesley!"

 

Miscellaneous

Baddesley Colliery Sidings, Atherstone: misc_coll-locos056

Beyer Peacock Works No 6841 'William Francis' is seen standing at Baddesley Colliery on 16th September 1963

 

Beyer Peacock Works No 6841 'William Francis' is seen standing at Baddesley Colliery on 16th September 1963. Only three Garratt locomotives were built in the UK for industrial use and the last was this locomotive in 1937. It was used to move coal to the Trent Valley sidings and had to cross the A5 just north of Atherstone. The locomotive was preserved at Bressingham Hall in Norfolk.

 

Edited by Ray T
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21 hours ago, Ray T said:

map_of_bermuda_colliery.gif

I might have a bash at modelling this now I’ve been furloughed. Probably will only get as far as scribbling bits down on a bit of paper though!

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" I have yet to come across such traffic, though"

Longford and Baddesley were the principal loading points for Coal for Croxley and London during the Second World War. Trainees like Moira Strachan illustrated above, often cycled from Baddesley to the Office at Suttons to find out where they were due to load rather than get to Longford and have to return to Baddesley when travelling the Bottom Road back from Brum.

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Grandson & I put a canal on our N gauge railway. Langley models do some very nice white metal kits in n gauge including Kit A18 Waterways scene which has motor & butty, lock gates, bollards & paddles. I think you can also get them ready assembled & painted too. Scroll down the link to kit A18

http://www.langley-models.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Accessories_A1__A65__incl_canal_boats__59.html

 

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Regarding  Coventry Colliery Wharf, whilst the picture shows a Grand Union pair there were other carriers to use the wharf. the origin of this wharf seems to be connected with a Longford coal merchant.

 

In 1984 the Coventry Canal Society stated:

Coventry colliery bought the land from a Longford coal merchant. Mr Perkins, and constructed the wharf, put in a weighbridge and made up a road to it. Mr Perkins had a contract with the colliery to supply coal. by boat, to Longford Power Station and places as far afield as London.

Coal came by lorry from Keresley and was tipped into the hoppers. Canal boats moved under the hoppers and the boatmen pulled levers straight into the boats. the boatmen could manoeure their boats about so that the coal was evenly distributed.

 

The Wharf was shown on their map as North of Judd's Lane Bridge  and south of the Sowe Aqueduct. In making the road to the wharf, the Sowe had to be crossed.

 

Longford.jpg

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On 10/04/2020 at 14:58, Ray T said:

Newdigate.  https://warwickshirerailways.com/misc/newdigate.htm

 

Griff: https://warwickshirerailways.com/misc/map_of_bermuda_colliery.htm

 

Last bit one photo, something different to model

 

Often difficult as usually the pit head was a little way from canal connections, in Warwickshire anyway.

misc_newd271.jpg

misc_newd284.jpg

misc_newd286.jpg

misc_newd298.jpg

map_of_bermuda_colliery.gif

What has happened in the Newdigate photo? There appear to be two semi-submerged wagons.

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39 minutes ago, Athy said:

What has happened in the Newdigate photo? There appear to be two semi-submerged wagons.

https://www.warwickshirerailways.com/misc/lnwrb23.htm

 

Photograph of a rake of derailed loose coupled Newdigate Colliery wagons lying in Coventry Canal on 21st May 1885. This photograph was published by the now defunct weekly newspaper the 'Coventry & Warwickshire Graphic' and illustrates the problem when handling loose coupled wagons on 21st May 1885. Often controlled by a 'shunter' running alongside the wagon(s), wagons were shunted free of a locomotive relying on the skill of the 'shunter' to drop each wagon's brake to slow them down. When the shunter made an error this is what can happen when wagons run away. The wagons had over run the canal arm, near to the exchange sidings, to the left of the photo continuing down the embankment into the cut. The wharf was used by the Newdigate Colliery to tranship coal to canal barges as an alternative to movement by rail.

 

misc_newd265.jpg

  • Greenie 1
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  • 1 year later...

I think this photo may be one of a series from the Imperial War Museum.

 

It is the coal chutes at the then gas works at Longford Coventry.

 

BRITISH CANALS IN WARTIME: TRANSPORT IN BRITAIN, 1944 | Imperial War Museums (iwm.org.uk)

 

Picture IWM

 

Second picture from "Evelyn's War." featured in Canal & Riverboat 2012

 

 

 

 

Longford chutes.JPG

 

 

 

Longford.JPG

Edited by Ray T
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