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LadyG

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire

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Got some super chestnuts.

Tried under the stove ... gritty

Sit on top of fire basket.. a few went on fire

wrapped in foil, on top side, best ever

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Yep, we got some last week. In tin foil ont top of the morso is the way to go. I dont think many people do them these days as they dont come pre packed with instructions lol.

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2 hours ago, LadyG said:

Got some super chestnuts.

Tried under the stove ... gritty

Sit on top of fire basket.. a few went on fire

wrapped in foil, on top side, best ever

Don't forget to prick them or they explode <BANG>, and this is particularly unfortunate if they're on the top shelf of the oven and a souffle <BANG> is on the bottom shelf 'cos you can't open the oven <BANG> to get them out. Don't ask me how I know this... ?

Edited by IanD
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1 minute ago, IanD said:

Don't forget to prick them or they explode, and this is particularly unfortunate if they're on the top shelf of the oven and a souffle is on the bottom shelf 'cos you can't open the oven to get them out. Don't ask me how I know this... ?

I love that, I can just see "whoever " it was standing by the stove torn by indecision 

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2 hours ago, LadyG said:

Got some super chestnuts.

Tried under the stove ... gritty

Sit on top of fire basket.. a few went on fire

wrapped in foil, on top side, best ever

I've had similar experiences trying to roast chestnuts using the multifuel stove. Mostly ended up with burnt offerings. I never tried the wrapped in foil on the top side though. Will have a go soon as I love roast chestnuts!

 

Jen

It's not as Christmassy as robins roasting on an open fire though.

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2 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

 

It's not as Christmassy as robins roasting on an open fire though.

:clapping:

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29 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

I love that, I can just see "whoever " it was standing by the stove torn by indecision 

Both myself and my (now-) wife watched the Baby Belling (remember them?) with horror as it <BANG> almost leapt off the worktop. Souffle with a coating of powdered chestnut is gritty and not very nice ?

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18 minutes ago, Athy said:

:clapping:

As I woke up one morning,

When all new things are born,

A robin perched upon my cill

To welcome in the morn.

I smiled sweetly at the robin's song

And, leaning out of bed,

Gently closed the window...

 

And squashed its bleedin' 'ead.

 

[skool in the 70's]

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Had chestnuts last night - cut crosses in the tops and  popped them on a baking tray in the freshly emptied ash catcher under the wood burner for 20 mins. Job was a good 'un: there were no explosions and no Robins were hurt. :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, IanD said:

Don't forget to prick them or they explode <BANG>, and this is particularly unfortunate if they're on the top shelf of the oven and a souffle <BANG> is on the bottom shelf 'cos you can't open the oven <BANG> to get them out. Don't ask me how I know this... ?

I get them everytime I'm on the boat and they're in the shops. In the ashtray they're gritty and often burnt. I do them on the top but haven't tried them wrapped in foil (yet)

Last year I brought some back from the boat and did them in the home oven on a baking tray,.  Forgot to nick them before putting them in. The explosions were impressive! Cleaning the oven afterwards took forever particularly the burner.

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48 minutes ago, Man 'o Kent said:

Ten minuits in a pressure cooker -- utterly delicious!

No grit and no burnt bit either . . .

As a child I HATED the pressure cooker. Resolved never to have one and so far have stuck to it. Rather eat burnt, gritty chestnuts..

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5 hours ago, Slim said:

As a child I HATED the pressure cooker. Resolved never to have one and so far have stuck to it. Rather eat burnt, gritty chestnuts..

Mum loved hers until it went pop whilst cooking beetroot, a blood red kitchen wasn't very trendy apparently :)

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11 hours ago, Slim said:

As a child I HATED the pressure cooker. Resolved never to have one and so far have stuck to it. Rather eat burnt, gritty chestnuts..

Was it the loud hissing noise that put you off? I remmeber it well, quite scary as a kid. However the modern pressure cooker has evolved and no longer emits the loud hiss and work realy well.

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2 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Was it the loud hissing noise that put you off? I remmeber it well, quite scary as a kid. However the modern pressure cooker has evolved and no longer emits the loud hiss and work realy well.

Yes, it was. I REALLY hated it. :angry: 

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My first experience with a pressure cooker was as a small boy when we were staying at my Grandfather's house. I collided with my Grandmother in the hallway, she fleeing the noise in  terror, me rushing towards the sound thinking my Grandfather had got a steam engine in the  kitchen!

 

They can hiss a bit if you have too much heat under them but that is the point, they require far less heat input to do the job. Spuds perfectly cooked in 10 minutes for example. In fact they are really very safe devices, they operate at low pressure,, (4 or 5 psi), they contain very little water so there is very little stored energy for an "explosion".  ('Aint going to happen.)

 

Why would a boater NOT want to use one? They use about 1/3rd of the gas, the food tastes better, there is less washing up and being a sealed container are a lot safer than saucepans of boiling water.

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1 hour ago, Man 'o Kent said:

My first experience with a pressure cooker was as a small boy when we were staying at my Grandfather's house. I collided with my Grandmother in the hallway, she fleeing the noise in  terror, me rushing towards the sound thinking my Grandfather had got a steam engine in the  kitchen!

 

They can hiss a bit if you have too much heat under them but that is the point, they require far less heat input to do the job. Spuds perfectly cooked in 10 minutes for example. In fact they are really very safe devices, they operate at low pressure,, (4 or 5 psi), they contain very little water so there is very little stored energy for an "explosion".  ('Aint going to happen.)

 

Why would a boater NOT want to use one? They use about 1/3rd of the gas, the food tastes better, there is less washing up and being a sealed container are a lot safer than saucepans of boiling water.

Actually the more water the better as far as no explosions goes. Water is not compressible but heating up air is and suddenly released goes boom. Safe loco or any high pressure boiler testing is done with the boiler completely filled to the very top with water to expel all air, then pumped up with a powerful pump and pressurized to something like twice its normal working pressure, If the the boiler bursts it won't explode but just gradually opens up at its weakest point and water will just leak out, no explosion. :)

Edited by bizzard

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43 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Actually the more water the better as far as no explosions goes. Water is not compressible but heating up air is and suddenly released goes boom. Safe loco or any high pressure boiler testing is done with the boiler completely filled to the very top with water to expel all air, then pumped up with a powerful pump and pressurized to something like twice its normal working pressure, If the the boiler bursts it won't explode but just gradually opens up at its weakest point and water will just leak out, no explosion. :)

 

 

Any fluid, (including air hot or not), under pressure presents a danger to some degree. Water is in many ways a remarkable material, one of its properties being its ability to absorbe energy, it takes an awful lot of heat to turn water into steam. When hot and under pressure as in a boiler all that stored energy is just itching to turn back into water.

 

A pressure cooker is a different animal, it holds just a few tablespoons of water, hardly a major hazzard even at 5psi. If you really want to twitch snuggle up to your engine, the diesel in the injector lines is at 1,500/2,000psi . . .

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Water expands in volume when heated but contained in its solid state is harmless if the container busts. If the water is heated to boiling point it still won't actually explode unless the containers not quite full and leaves room for steam to develop which is highly expansive, which will explode out if the container fails. The more water that is in a pressure cooker the less room for the volume of expanding steam pressure voluum,  so if the safety valve fails there is a less volume of steam to burst out, the explosion would be smaller but still pretty powerful.  Diesel engine HP injection system is purely hydraulic closed circuit and will not explode if something gives but just spurt out fuel at high pressure, dangerous if you happen to be too close to the spurt but it won't explode.

Edited by bizzard

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