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Man 'o Kent

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  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  2. Better a dipstick, (at least a dipstick has some purpose), than a dickhead, (those who drive anything that costs more than most working stiffs earn in a year). Back on topic: Late last year while helping move a quite tidy 57ft narrowboat to its paid for winter mooring we stopped for the night. Along comes this shiny well crewed seventy footer which starts dithering around clearly looking for somewhere to park. Now we had tied up leaving a respectful gap between us and the next boat so we indicated that we would move along and make room for them. We did so and then took their lines and helped them tie up. Did we get even one word of thanks? --- Did we heck! --- Them's the sort of boater we can do without!
  3. Valliant, producers of domestic boilers, have/had an "automatiuc air vent" on their sealed system combi boilers. Don't know how it works but it is good for two & half bar pressure. My domestic boiler, a "VCW sine 18" is getting a bit long in the tooth but still working so I don't know if later models use something like it but Valliant are pretty good for spares. Might be worth a look?
  4. I had a 1936 National engine, (ex working boat). From the look of it was still on its origional dimpled chrome liners. Those dimples were very shallow, no more than a thou or two and they were still there sixty odd years later. Gawd knows how many hours it'd done!
  5. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  6. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  8. Certainly popular along the Essex/Suffolk coast in the 70's/80's, my one was made by the local sailmaker at Bell Warf out of offcuts of sailcloth. Still got it and it's still fit for use although a bit harder to get into these days . . . Made in the right material they are windproof and can be waxed too. The simple design means there is little chance of it getting snagged which is an aid to safety. If memory serves I seem to remember a picture of Robin Knox Johnson sporting one on Suhaili.
  9. I remember when that stuff first turned up in our sailing club, so toothsome you could almost chew it. But them were the days when it was brewed not manufactured, nuffink lasts, gnat's p**s now. As to getting a scale, almost anything of a regular shape that is in common use will do, a coin being a good example. Thinking about the origins of that screw, I'm beginning to think it may well be an interloper.
  10. Given the use of a long lasting anti-freeze it may be just disolved/entrained air collecting at a high point. Water that is stirred, as when the engine is running, will hold more air, when the coolant is still for any length of time the air escapes and will collect at a high point..
  11. If you think a BMC is heavy try a National DM2 and its gearbox, the flywheel alone weighs in at 22 stone . . . Two of us managed it with no fancy kit, just a lot of grunting and colourful language and thankfully in the end no "incidents". Just think ahead, plan carefully and you will be OK.
  12. Sounnd advice, no matter how much bother it is get it off the engine and onto the bench, I suspect that brute is going to give you a heck of a fight. When re-building get a tube of copper antisieze grease to apply to the threads, it'll give you half a chance for the next time around.
  13. I think it might not be an earthquake at all, just the owner of the boat that I am involved with trying to move the scenery again!
  14. Chewing gum, pressed into the nut something less than half the diameter, if possible chill and then carefully remove. Inspect carefully with a good steel ruler and magnyfing glass. Do it more than once to be sure although I would not recommending using the same piece of gum. Knowing the pitch is usually the clincher. Flthy habit and about the only thing the stuff is good for.
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