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Kitchen worktop - where to buy?


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I'm looking to replace my kitchen worktops. I'm not after anything particularly exotic, in fact good old laminate worktop would be fine provided it's a nice colour and pattern. Trouble is I'm not seeing much that I like. Ideally I'd like an off-white or cream with a subtle sparkle or pattern (I'm not after plain white) for under £100. I only need two pieces (1920 x 600mm and 800 x 460mm, and three end strips). I've trawled through the mainstream retail suppliers and had a bit of a look on ebay but the value options seem really limited.

 

Is anyone able to recommend any suppliers that might be able to help?

 

Thanks.

 

LCx

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I'd have said the mainstream DIY chains such as B&Q, Wickes and Homebase are the ones to try first, because you can visit the store and physically see them, then order (or buy if its in stock - B&Q keep only a limited stock of a few lines). If you're after more choice/variety, then there's plenty of other more specialist kitchen fitters/suppliers but I can't see them being any cheaper. £100-150 is about the price of a 3m length of worktop these days.

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These are a bit more than you wanted to spend, but I got mine from them and am well pleased. I went for bamboo as it looks good and is more stable with humidity than say oak, which is important if the boat is left unused for a month or two in the winter. Mine is 3 years old and so far no splits or wrap. Any one else used solid wood tops in their boat with good or bad results?

 

http://www.worktop-express.co.uk/wood_worktops/bamboo_worktops.html

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Any one else used solid wood tops in their boat with good or bad results?

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I put a 6x2ft (2000x600mm) mahogany plank in as my kitchen worktop :) (its a solid plank 48mm thick not a manufactured worktop)

 

Its been in about 6 months and hasn't moved. Boat is residential so it won't get many wild temperature cycles I guess.

 

I bought the plank as a planed all round kiln dried board on fleabay.

Edited by magnetman
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I put a 6x2ft (2000x600mm) mahogany plank in as my kitchen worktop smile.png (its a solid plank 48mm thick not a manufactured worktop)

 

Its been in about 6 months and hasn't moved. Boat is residential so it won't get many wild temperature cycles I guess.

 

I bought the plank as a planed all round kiln dried board on fleabay.

I would suggest that you have been very lucky (so far). Even at 48mm thick I would expect it to bow across the grain.

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Howdens seconded. Still not sure if they do any pale colours though, but their range of worktops certainly used to be diffrerent from the mainstream retailers.

 

Also check out Ikea. Same applies, being foreign their stuff is different because it isn't designed for the UK market, even though it still sells well here.


And a third approach is consider buying a sheet of just laminate. The timber suppliers like TimberWorld usually have sample sets and Formica for example, have a far bigger range/selection than you get on made up worktops.

 

Glue it onto your existing worktops with Evo-Stick which is available in 5 litre cans. Great fun in an enclosed space!

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I would suggest that you have been very lucky (so far). Even at 48mm thick I would expect it to bow across the grain.

Fingers crossed. I too thought it would do something silly but it hasn't (well not yet anyway). Looking closely at it there is a very slight curve to it across the width of the board but nothing you can see from normal angles. Time will tell on that I guess.

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Thanks for all the suggestions, still mulling them over. The Worktop Express site mentioned by Chewbacka is interesting - I had thought not to go for wood because I've got wood panelling everywhere already, but there's one or two on there that are quite nice - and their prices aren't too scary. Sorry, but I'm not brave enough to try Magnetman's monster plank (even if I could lift it!). I'm changing the sink as well which means a new hole in a different place so I'm afraid Mike the Boilerman's glue-fest is out as well (I can imagine I'd probably end up stuck to the formica as if it was giant flypaper). Otherwise most laminates are very dark. Still, Ikea are definitely one of the cheapest although I'm finding their custom-made guide a little impenetrable, and I'm still working through the Magnet and the Howden ranges.

 

LCx

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Try Howdens. Branches all over. Its mainly trade but you will get served.

 

Howdens are OK if you have a trade account, but their retail prices are very high. I have used them several times for non standard size doors, but have never been that impressed with their Kitchens.

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We got andromeda white from Spectra. It's got sparkly bits in it. It was around £120.00 if I remember correctly

 

My local timber merchant occasionally sells ones with slight damage at 30-40% off

 

http://www.spectraworksurfaces.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/Spectra_Worksurfaces_Brochure_2014.pdf

 

Solid work surfaces are very heavy.

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i have just fitted howdens units the expensive ones as my friend works there they are excellent quality, well made strong. blue doors same colour as my baby blue rayburn perfik. the worktops are oak usual staves glued together which did 6 years in my last boat without warping this worktop i purchased through ebay seller was the chippy shop they delivered to the boat and we put it straight in no problems good luck with your search

 

peter

Edited by peterboat
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Howdens are OK if you have a trade account, but their retail prices are very high. I have used them several times for non standard size doors, but have never been that impressed with their Kitchens.

 

 

You would be once you get their 70% trade discount!

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I got my solid beech work tops from b&q £83 for 3 metres but you need to give them several coats of Danish oil but well worth the while as it really brings out the grain.

 

Neil

same for mine they look stunning paid more but wanted 4 meters plus an island for the boat kitchen

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I used 40mm solid maple worktop from B&Q. Light in colour and after seven years is still as flat as it was when it went in.

 

I prefer worktop oil to danish oil for worktops. Danish oil is effectively a varnish and will wear through in patches. To reseal you really need to sand it off and re-do. The worktop oil you can just splash on occasionally, particularly if you are going to be away for a few days to give a liberal coating a chance to soak in.

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I used 40mm solid maple worktop from B&Q. Light in colour and after seven years is still as flat as it was when it went in.

 

I prefer worktop oil to danish oil for worktops. Danish oil is effectively a varnish and will wear through in patches. To reseal you really need to sand it off and re-do. The worktop oil you can just splash on occasionally, particularly if you are going to be away for a few days to give a liberal coating a chance to soak in.

 

Generically maybe, but not a varnish in the conventional sense, it is actually an oil polish,which is why it is prone to wearing, requiring regular re-application. Unlike most conventional varnishes and Oil plishes, it's performance really depends upon which selection of oils the manufacturers have used, some are good, some are rubbish.

 

The main benefit of Danish Polish, over more conventional finishes, is that it is easy to apply and is therfore suited to the DIYer.

Edited by David Schweizer
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I used linseed oil on my mahogany plank

 

Linseed Oil will dress timber and protect it, but is very slow drying (can take weeks) Boiled Linseed Oil is quicker. However, for furniture etc, Linseed Oil Polish is preferable, as the first coat will dry within 24 hours and each subsequent coat in less time.

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