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rupertbear

Horses and Steam?

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I came across this picture via Twitter:

 

EJ1JXtnX0AYSQvc?format=jpg&name=large

 

 

' On the Towpath by David Farqhuarson 1882-83 '

 

Is there a reason why horses might have been used to draw a steam boat through locks or is this a case of artistic licence/confusion?

It also appears to be a narrow lock. I'm no expert but I would have thought the given date a little early for steam?

 

 

 

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Artistic licence is evidenced accordingly ...

 

The geezer on the left is very tall and wouldn't fit in the house on his right, so where can he be going?

Donald Trump is peering out of the boat's funnel.

 

The quandary concerning the horse towing the steam boat is actually an alternative explanation supporting a methodological bias.

Closer scrutiny shows the tug is connected to the horse by a large pole and is indeed pushing it ahead.

 

Also we don't know the nationality of the geezer on the left 

EJ1JXtnX0AYSQvc.jpg

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Clear evidence of early hurlestone lock issues. Hnoc member.

if you are the only steamer on the llangollen when you get stuck you use what is wandering around to get you out of the lock.

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Both horses appear to be fitted with solar panels and the vessel  looks like one of those whale harpoon boats used in South Georgia.

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This painting dates from 1888 and, I think, depicts a boat with steam or smoke emitting plus a tow-rope in use - presumably with a horse.   The painting is behind a glass frame so the picture is a bit confused with reflections.

 

I read somewhere that Henry De Salis  used a boat that looked a bit like a gondola when touring the canals to write his first guide book - could this be him?   Was the boat steam powered, if so why the tow-rope?   Any explanations appreciated.

 

20160928_225235.jpg.fa660b098699da9ae428d970592b94d5.jpg

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1 hour ago, billh said:

...the vessel  looks like one of those whale harpoon boats used in South Georgia.

Been there, been aboard those boats (I think they're all but sunk now though), and you're right- it does!  

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To me, it looks like a fishing cobble from the NE coast, with a fisherman on board and smoke rising from a fish boiler.

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13 hours ago, Waterway2go said:

This painting dates from 1888 and, I think, depicts a boat with steam or smoke emitting plus a tow-rope in use - presumably with a horse.   The painting is behind a glass frame so the picture is a bit confused with reflections.

 

I read somewhere that Henry De Salis  used a boat that looked a bit like a gondola when touring the canals to write his first guide book - could this be him?   Was the boat steam powered, if so why the tow-rope?   Any explanations appreciated.

 

20160928_225235.jpg.fa660b098699da9ae428d970592b94d5.jpg

 

Ah, now the inspiration for Hudson boats distinction bow becomes clear! ?

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Surely it's just a coal range for the cooking.  

 

And judging by the halo it must be Jesus. 

 

It appears to be under tow by another vessel rather than a hanimal. 

Edited by magnetman

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