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Lister SR2 question. Is this a Tomey pressure gauge and where does it connect?


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Hello, newcomer here. ? My names Jim, I'm based in the North West of England, I have a narrowboat called Sin Prisa. It's an unusual name and means 'No Hurry' in Spanish, I was thinking of changing the name but it's grown on me and I like its originality. I purchased the boat in 2019, it needs a lot of work doing to it and as I was new to narrowboats at the time I'm having to learn much about boats such as the DC electrics, the engine etc... Btw, my engine is a Lister SR2 with a LH150 reversing gear. Now for my first request for help, I hope this is an appropriate place to post this. Please have a look at the included photos. I'm wondering what this actually is and where it connects to, the second photo shows the disconnected pipe. Research suggests it's a pressure gauge. I'm also not sure what the tap to the right is for, it seems to release oil.
Thanks in advance for any help anyone can give. ?

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tomey_gauge2-forum_edit.jpg

tomey_gauge_oil-forum_edit.jpg

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Its an oil pressure gauge  and an old Tecalemit oil drain valve, possibly for emptying the engine oil out of the engine sump.

 

The gauge should connect to where the oil pressure warning light switch is fitted, possibly into a tee piece so that the gauge and the warning light both work.

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There may be a connection on the end of the fuel pump housing for a gauge

 

Not all SR engines have one

 

Richard

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Hi Tracy, thanks for replying. I don't think there's a oil pressure warning light switch on the boat although what you say is helpful, I will look into things a little deeper. Cheers Richard, I will also look into that too. ?

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25 minutes ago, Sin Prisa said:

Hi Tracy, thanks for replying. I don't think there's a oil pressure warning light switch on the boat although what you say is helpful, I will look into things a little deeper. Cheers Richard, I will also look into that too. ?

Is this an ex hire boat? Those Tecalemit valves were often used to enable quicker servicing.

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3 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Is this an ex hire boat? Those Tecalemit valves were often used to enable quicker servicing.

Interesting you say that, I thought they were a standard lister marine kit. Both our ex bwb re engined listers have had them and both, were re engined in the same era.

They work well if the seals are intact. I always grease the rubber seal before emptying the sump, to improve the action.

There may be a two way tap under the gearbox to empty that if they share oils.

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Posted (edited)

Hi all, I found where the pipe connects. The included photos show the location and nut that was on the connection. The connector inside the nut appears to have been brazed over, obviously to stop the leak when the bolt is put back on. I'm wondering why the gauge was deliberately disconnected in this way. Possibilities:

  • Leak / accidental breakage. Simpler to block it instead of repairing?
  • Efficiency. Perhaps disconnecting the gauge makes the engine work better?
  • Faulty gauge. Again, simpler to block?

In any case I'd like to fix it and see for myself. I'd be very grateful if anyone can tell me the name of that type of connecting nut, (available on ebay perhaps), and also if I would need to solder / braze it to the pipe?

bolt_connect1_forum_edit.jpg

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Edited by Sin Prisa
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That looks like it was a flare fitting at one time. If you remove the other nut into the banjo, you should get back to a BSP thread which you can adapt to the copper pipe to test the gauge.

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Hi Ex Brummie, Google is also my friend, lol. I now know what a flare fitting, banjo bolt and a bsp thread is and with that I think I can work out what you mean. I would like to obtain the original flare fitting nut at some point if the whole thing works. Thanks for reply! ?

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And get one plenty long enough to put a couple of coils in it just before it enters the engine fitting to absorb vibration so it doesn't snap off again.

  • Greenie 2
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On 23/05/2021 at 00:42, roland elsdon said:

Interesting you say that, I thought they were a standard lister marine kit. Both our ex bwb re engined listers have had them and both, were re engined in the same era.

They work well if the seals are intact. I always grease the rubber seal before emptying the sump, to improve the action.

There may be a two way tap under the gearbox to empty that if they share oils.

As you say these pumps were supplied by Lister Marine. But not as standard. They would have been an optional extra.

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We've got an old stock original pipe if you wanted to go that way. Chances are it is for fitting the gauge to the fan housing.

 

Otherwise, it's going to be a standard BSP nut and nipple, you'll need to get the nipple fitted to your new pipe - I prefer silver soldering

 

Richard

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Hi, thanks everyone above for the additional info, especially the links, cheers springy, looks like what I need. This may sound slightly idiosyncratically obsessive but I want to preserve as much of the original boat as I can so I'll probably repair the pipe rather than buy a new one.

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26 minutes ago, Sin Prisa said:

Hi, thanks everyone above for the additional info, especially the links, cheers springy, looks like what I need. This may sound slightly idiosyncratically obsessive but I want to preserve as much of the original boat as I can so I'll probably repair the pipe rather than buy a new one.

 

But if the old pipe does not have an anti-vibration coil as Bizzard describes make sure you put one in, otherwise vibration is likely to cause on going pipe failure. Also anneal the copper pipe regularly - before reinstating it and I would suggest once a year.

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Just now, Sin Prisa said:

Hi Tony, the existing pipe kind of spirals before it goes into the engine, would that be the anti-vibration coil?

 

Yes, probably. As long as soon after it running towards the gauge the pipe is clipped to something so you don't have  along length of unsupported pipe free to wave about. Having the coil will not remove the need for annealing to keep the copper soft.

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You could also slip the tube through a length of rubber tubing to help with vibration before you fix a nut and nipple olive on it.  Windscreen washer tubing available at motor factors.

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3 minutes ago, bizzard said:

You could also slip the tube through a length of rubber tubing to help with vibration before you fix a nut and nipple olive on it.  Windscreen washer tubing available at motor factors.

Great idea bizzard! Cheers Tony, I'll secure it somehow. Tracy, that might work, if I could braze lol.

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38 minutes ago, Sin Prisa said:

Great idea bizzard! Cheers Tony, I'll secure it somehow. Tracy, that might work, if I could braze lol.

You have a gas ring? Solder it on will be OK as long as you control the vibration., silver solder is better.

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