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Wood ideally needs at least 12 months seasoning before burning, depending on the type of wood it can be longer. If you burn it sooner be prepared for more emissions from your chimney and make sure you clean your flue regularly. 

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8 hours ago, LadyG said:

Gosh, well there were 700 at an illegal rave, just how much did the police fine them?

Scotland naver had Trespass as far as I am aware, though there were a few notices, and before the"freedom of access" Laws I was quizzed by a landowner chappie when I put my tent up to dry it one morning,  I certainly wasn't stealth camping, it was a bright orange tent.

The important part of the Trespass (Scotland) Act 1865 is still in effect. 

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5 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Got one of those from Screwfix,works very well for me

I've used one of these.   Some years ago I had a large silver birch taken down, much of it getting on for two ft in diameter. The feller kindly cut it into eight inch slices.  Many of these split with a sledge and wedge or large axe shortly after felling, but I left a lot of it in the slices to season for a year or more.  After this time it just would not split, even with my wedges and seven pound sledge.  The axe just bounced off. Odd as I thought it would split easier after seasoning.  Had to resort to the log bomb as illustrated above which dealt with it, but I made sure there was no one else anywhere near.

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20 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

No problem perhaps, but it can take up to 2 years to season oak. Starting now, as winter approaches, I'd expect at least a year; starting as spring commences it could be as 'quick' as 6 months 

I've had a 2 ton load of split oak seasoning in the garden in bright sunshine and a single row stack so good air flow since last September (2019). Tested a cut piece this week and still at 35 % on the moisture meter in the middle, ends nice and dry. Sticking with the ash for now. 

 

I used to shoot rabbit and pheasants, had permission from the farm we back on to, but our local butcher sells rabbit for less than £4 and pheasants at £7 a brace so it's not worth the mess of cleaning and gutting myself at that price.

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2 hours ago, gatekrash said:

I've had a 2 ton load of split oak seasoning in the garden in bright sunshine and a single row stack so good air flow since last September (2019). Tested a cut piece this week and still at 35 % on the moisture meter in the middle, ends nice and dry. Sticking with the ash for now. 

 

I used to shoot rabbit and pheasants, had permission from the farm we back on to, but our local butcher sells rabbit for less than £4 and pheasants at £7 a brace so it's not worth the mess of cleaning and gutting myself at that price.

No, it's not profitable, if its done on these massive shoots, there might be a few hundred in cash,  the guns get a brace, and down the line a few folks get the ones that look damaged, the butcher will get them part dressed I suppose and get the market presentable, it's better to keep folks in touch with reality, local butcher in Largs got all his game from a highland estate, they were pretty good, all sorts of game, and they froze well, so available six months of the year.

I've kept the old bit of wood for now, but will dump it asap, don't want to offend the donor.

Edited by LadyG
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8 minutes ago, LadyG said:

No, it's not profitable, if its done on these massive shoots, there might be a few hundred in cash,  the guns get a brace, and down the line a few folks get the ones that look damaged,

The money is not in the shot game but in the fees the guns pay.

On our local shoot (we used to provide 3 meals a day for the Guns & beaters) the 12 Guns pay £1000 each per day and the daily bag is limited to 250 birds.

The guns also have to pay their own transport and accomodation costs.

There is no shortage of guns wanting to come, the Dutch particularly have a waiting list to come and shoot.

 

The surplus birds were sold to the game dealers by the Gamekeeper and the cash went back into paying for beaters etc.

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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On 08/11/2020 at 10:59, gatekrash said:

 

 

I used to shoot rabbit and pheasants, had permission from the farm we back on to, but our local butcher sells rabbit for less than £4 and pheasants at £7 a brace so it's not worth the mess of cleaning and gutting myself at that price.

It isn't really about saving money though is it?

I go out in the autumnal woods for the peace and quiet,  the sights, sounds and smell.

Whether I actually bag a pigeon or not doesn't often bother me.

It's a bit like telling a bloke stood in a Scottish river up to his knackers for hours on end that you can buy a full salmon for 20 quid down at Tesco.

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Just now, noddyboater said:

It isn't really about saving money though is it?

I go out in the autumnal woods for the peace and quiet,  the sights, sounds and smell.

Whether I actually bag a pigeon or not doesn't often bother me.

It's a bit like telling a bloke stood in a Scottish river up to his knackers for hours on end that you can buy a full salmon for 20 quid down at Tesco.

agree 100% out all morning with the dog and gun, come home with a pheasant was a bonus 

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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

agree 100% out all morning with the dog and gun, come home with a pheasant was a bonus 

Most of which I agree with, apart from the pheasant, never liked the things far too gamey for me, now a duck or bunny that would be a good day :)

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