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howardang

Vintage forms of Transport

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6 hours ago, frangar said:

 

 

Thats a view of it in the 1960s but it was much the same as I remember it. Sadly gone last time I visited a good few years ago. 

That's a cracking good picture of the viewing platform. 6" glass plate I wouldn't wonder.

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12 hours ago, Derek R. said:

That's a cracking good picture of the viewing platform. 6" glass plate I wouldn't wonder.

Its lovely isn't it!! I just found it on a google for images of the viewing platform....its so evocative...something you just don't seem get with a fully digital image in my opinion. 

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You lucky people - seeing 'proper' locomotives in the flesh.

All 'we' ever had was the 'Shoreham puffer' - a sad little tanker -  sounding his whistle from across the brooks  as he crossed the river Adur...

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This gives some idea of the size of Blisworth junction when we used to go train spotting

DA8DDAD1-A03F-46B3-9E29-30E480F6D6C6.png

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5 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

This gives some idea of the size of Blisworth junction when we used to go train spotting

DA8DDAD1-A03F-46B3-9E29-30E480F6D6C6.png

Looks like a Lizzie on the job. Vast majority of trains to and from Liverpool were very heavy requiring a Lizzie, Duchess or double heading. Thy were usually packed full of troops going on and off leave from the docks. I remember as a kid leaving from Liverpool Lime street for Euston behind a Duchess  46239 City of Chester pulling 26 coaches, it arrived 20 mins early and had to wait outside Euston for the longest platform to become available. Stopped at Crewe only.

The only wash I had in those days was when sticking my head out of the window when the engine picked up water from the troughs.

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Bizzard here’s a Duchess roaring through Blisworth. In 1958 I went from Northampton to Lime Street to join my first ship at Stanlow, it hadn’t arrived so was put up in the Adelphi for 2 days.

FA95EA43-0320-4D22-9D07-CDC9C0ADED66.png

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Ma & Pa had a pub in Chorley called the Wagonmakers Arms. This was in Railway Street and directly across the road from the shunting yard. This was in the sixties. It’s all gone now and is a dual carriageway. Things must have become a bit quite during the day, Dad got a job working in the yard as a shutter or whatever the job title was. He would walk or run alongside goods trucks and with a very large pole apply the breaks to slow and stop said trucks. We used to look out from the bedroom windows of the pubs and oh! How we laughed. Dad was one of those chaps who could put his hand to all sorts of tasks. 

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And a proper shunters pole, with the hook for lifting coupling links, is an excellent weapon for raking out a bladefull.  Hard to find real ones these days, but  modern repro ones are about.

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4 hours ago, BEngo said:

And a proper shunters pole, with the hook for lifting coupling links, is an excellent weapon for raking out a bladefull.  Hard to find real ones these days, but  modern repro ones are about.

We recovered several of those poles from the canal at Guide Bridge, Brookside sidings. it would be when BR gave up loose coupled wagons in 19mumblemumble. they acquired a definite curve of the pole after years of use, levering the coupling  on or off using  one of the buffers as a fulcrum.They also got damaged levering the "hand" brakes on the wagon sides. The curly  ends have since got new poles and now used as an excellent prop cleaner. Talking of recovery of transport things from the canal, late 1960's also at Guide Bridge, a  long bamboo shaft  with hook that used to be for replacing errant trolley bus trolleys at the 219x turn round place on the canal bridge. The overhead "points" were worked with  a hand pull on the traction pole by the bus conductor. Sometimes went to school on the trolleybus in bad weather, fare was 1d.

Then there were the brand new production Deltics on delivery to Doncaster from Newton le Willows 1961, D9007 and later D9009, absolutely fantastic at the time .(the Deltics were passing through,not in the canal!)

More recently, like 35 years ago, passing the sidings on the boat and a Sulzer Type 2 came off the road with a heck of a crash, all wheels on the floor.

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