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Handle for tiller without extension?

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Sooo... I've bought exactly one tiller handle thingy in my life and it came attached to my tiller extension which came with my boat.

 

Now I have new boat with much longer fixed tiller which is the same width all along and hollow inside. Are they sometimes designed to be used 'as is' or do I buy just the handle part of a tiller extension (ie no extension!)? Are they a standard width? Do I just push fit handle in? (Presumably no tiller pin?)

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Tiller extensions come in more than one size so you will need to measure your existing pipe if you are going to add a wooden handle.

The handles are split at the end which goes in the pipe and have a wedge to tighten the fit in the pipe. You would need to adjust this before pushing the handle in. I'd probably glue the handle in as the wedge is meant to be tightened after insertion and you won't be able to do this. 

Be aware of the extra length the handle would add. Make sure it does not hang outside the boat when dropping in a lock. Maybe cut a bit off the pipe the length of the new handle. 

You can of course use the tiller with no handle but it's less comfortable. 

You could also consider shortening the tiller to replace the pipe with the usual brass and wood. That would mean having a piece of bar inserted into the cut end. 

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5 hours ago, philjw said:

Tiller extensions come in more than one size so you will need to measure your existing pipe if you are going to add a wooden handle.

The handles are split at the end which goes in the pipe and have a wedge to tighten the fit in the pipe. You would need to adjust this before pushing the handle in. I'd probably glue the handle in as the wedge is meant to be tightened after insertion and you won't be able to do this. 

Be aware of the extra length the handle would add. Make sure it does not hang outside the boat when dropping in a lock. Maybe cut a bit off the pipe the length of the new handle. 

You can of course use the tiller with no handle but it's less comfortable. 

You could also consider shortening the tiller to replace the pipe with the usual brass and wood. That would mean having a piece of bar inserted into the cut end. 

A method I've used to overcome this:

 

First slightly "rough up" the smaller diameter  part of the wooden handle which goes in the brass tiller tube with medium grit sandpaper, this will help with grip.

With the handle in the brass tube hold the tube downwards with the wooden handle on a block of wood.

Insert a broom handle down the tube and lightly tap with a mallet. This will push the wedge into its slot.

 

I trickled some varnish into the joint between the handle and the brass tube to help protect from ingress of moisture.

 

As has been suggested glue can be used as well

 

 

DSCF3218.JPG

20170201_200333.jpg

Edited by Ray T

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2 hours ago, philjw said:

Tiller extensions come in more than one size so you will need to measure your existing pipe if you are going to add a wooden handle.

The handles are split at the end which goes in the pipe and have a wedge to tighten the fit in the pipe. You would need to adjust this before pushing the handle in. I'd probably glue the handle in as the wedge is meant to be tightened after insertion and you won't be able to do this. 

Be aware of the extra length the handle would add. Make sure it does not hang outside the boat when dropping in a lock. Maybe cut a bit off the pipe the length of the new handle. 

You can of course use the tiller with no handle but it's less comfortable. 

You could also consider shortening the tiller to replace the pipe with the usual brass and wood. That would mean having a piece of bar inserted into the cut end. 

I found that the best way to knock in the wedge was to drop an eyeless mooring pin down the tube a couple of times to 'pile drive' it in 

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Lyons boat yard on the Stratford have a selection of tiller handles, cos I bought one there after I broke mine.  They were good enough to let me try them for size and appearance before I bought.  Other chandleries exist.

Alternatively find a friendly wood turner and have one made to suit you.  Most wood turners are always keen on an interesting job  because there is only limited demand for bowls, pens and salt/pepper sets?

N

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Some of the older boats (maybe 70's and 80's) do seem to have 'just' a long steel tubular tiller with no provision (or intention) to have a wooden handle.

From memory it seems to be more prevalent on ex hire boats of the era - maybe hirers couldn't be trusted not lose the handle.

 

If it is a 'modern' boat then it would seem unusual, and maybe the suggestion to cut it down and use a standard extension and handle is the way to go.

 

How long is the tiller ?

If you push it over to 'full-lock' does it overhang the side of the boat or is it retained inside the 'outline' of the boat ?

If you were to add (say) another 12" with a handle would it still be within the outline of the boat ?

 

What age / make is your boat ?

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Thanks all.

 

Yes, @philjw and @Alan de Enfield, (not sure why that didn't link for you), that is sort of the appearance - hence the question.

 

She is a 2005 Darke so not ex-hire - suspect not been used for an awful lot of cruising, although don't know the full history. (Owner before last and most recent ones didn't do much I think).

 

I'll try a little trip in her as is (not yet in the water) and have a look at how much extra length is/isn't do-able. I suppose a short term fix until I decide on if I'm going to end up cutting/get a wood turner to make me a nice short handle/? might be to see if a rubber grip can be added around the existing part - fingers will freeze otherwise!

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5 minutes ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

might be to see if a rubber grip can be added around the existing part - fingers will freeze otherwise!

Motorcyclist handlebar glove / mitt / muff.

You can even get heated ones that run of a PP9 battery - luxury !!

 

 

Image result for motorcyclists handlebar mitt

  • Happy 1

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27 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Motorcyclist handlebar glove / mitt / muff.

You can even get heated ones that run of a PP9 battery - luxury !!

 

 

Image result for motorcyclists handlebar mitt

PP9 !!    Is it April 1st already?

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The OP said it is a fixed tiller so a wedged handle won't work. Sometimes an old sawn off golf club handle can be bashed in. Or a slightly oversized normal wooden one whittled down and glued in. Many types of handles might fit. A wooden handle from an old pair of garden shears, Thick industral broom handle, lots of options, but will need to be a tight fit, glued in, with perhaps a retaining screw screwed in the side.

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54 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

???????????

 

 

Image result for pp9 battery

I thought that was a PP3 battery, the pp9 being chunkier and with the terminals further apart, both 9volts.

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5 minutes ago, BilgePump said:

I thought that was a PP3 battery, the pp9 being chunkier and with the terminals further apart, both 9volts.

 

You know the old saying "You know what thought did - followed a muck cart and thought it was a wedding".

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Midland SwinChandlers do ash ones for not too many pennies in a variety of sizes. Can't tell from the description if what they call a 1" handle is to fit a 1" outside, or 1" inside diameter tube. You'd need to ask them to be sure of getting the right size.

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies

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So, I popped into my local motorcycle shop... the mitts they had were HUGE. But the lovely chap there (who apparently kayaks) suggested that pogies (basically the same thing - but for rowers, and, apparently, kayakers) might do the trick. I've not been in a rowing club for _years_ (and it was a point of honour not to use pogies when I was) but think he may have a point. Will report back if I try it!

Oh, and I'm now really fond of those Midland [Whoevers]. They helpfully popped me an extra couple of fender hooks in to an order when I told them I wanted somewhere between one and two pack sizes :-)

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