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Nemysys

Insulation

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1 hour ago, stegra said:

I think the only way would be to use nails

Or a pilot hole? Or did you try that?

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Just now, WotEver said:

Or a pilot hole? Or did you try that?

 

Just now, WotEver said:

Or a pilot hole? Or did you try that?

Yep. The drill bit just snags up the same as the screws. 

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1 minute ago, stegra said:

Yep. The drill bit just snags up the same as the screws. 

Interesting... I’m planning on insulating my conservatory roof with this stuff. Maybe I’ll use an air stapler instead of screws :)

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When I've used it in buildings I've stapled it to the rafters then nailed a batten onto it so that I could screw the plasterboard on. You would lose quite a bit of space on a boat doing that though. Sometimes the screws will go through if you apply a lot of pressure to compress the quilt but it only takes one to snag and you have to take it all back off. Normally a lot more than one snag. 

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I chose spray foam over thinsulate as I was worried that damp air might still (slowly) get to the cold steel surface and form condensation with the problems of mould and rust.

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1 hour ago, Chewbacka said:

I chose spray foam over thinsulate as I was worried that damp air might still (slowly) get to the cold steel surface and form condensation with the problems of mould and rust.

A couple of months back I spoke to the manufacturers of Superquilt (the stuff I linked to earlier) and they were very firm on the fact that all joints must be taped with aluminium tape specifically to avoid any small leaks. 

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1 hour ago, WotEver said:

A couple of months back I spoke to the manufacturers of Superquilt (the stuff I linked to earlier) and they were very firm on the fact that all joints must be taped with aluminium tape specifically to avoid any small leaks. 

And not only do small leaks let wet air in, but small leaks mean no ventilation so the damp can’t get out again.  Too iffy for me.

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7 hours ago, WotEver said:

I used something similar which was gold in colour, i can't remember the name but it is highly regarded in the roofing industry. A noticeable difference in temperature stability and no trace of condensation.

7 hours ago, Narrowboat Nimrod said:

Very similar, I think it was by 3M and was black. His videos shows him cutting and installing it.

The one i used has a black, breathable side and used 3M i believe. 

 To fit, i cut slots for the lugs welded to the hull sides and then screwed battens to the lugs, trapping the material, another advantage of this is that it means no timber is in contact with the steel. Aluminium tape was used to seal the slots. I'm not sure that cutting small sections and joining them with tape would be as effective, it would be better to roll more out as needed but how practical that is for your refit i don't know. 

FB_IMG_1515926706726.jpg

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On 05/07/2019 at 18:19, Tony Brooks said:

If you can afford it I would cover the whole insulation with slivered "bubblewrap" style insulation from rolls and tape all seams/joints with aluminium tape. That way if there are gaps in the board insulation you will at least have an insulating vapour barrier behind the decorative cabin/hull side boarding.

Foil bubble wrap isn't insulation.

 

Its one of the big cons in the building industry.

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Thank you to everyone who has replied and commented, I really appreciate it. Please continue, I am learning more and more as I go along.

 

Bearing in mind the boat is 41 years old, we have had her for the last 8 years with minimal updates to the interior. Only panels we have had to change is where a window has leaked over winter.


She has had 15mm (ish) expanded polystyrene insulation panels for as long as we have had her, and I would think by looking at fixtures and fittings, another 10+ yeas at least. So I would guess 20+ years of sub-optimal insulation, if not longer!


To put it into context, I think we are very lucky. The boat has just had a survey (2019), and comments like “base plate was built with 5.0mm steel, still by ultrasonic measurement is 5.0mm thick”, and “sides were built with 4.8mm and 9.6mm steel, by ultrasonic measurement still are 4.8mm and 9.6mm). I have been told in the past that it is believed the steel used was ‘marine grade’ steel.

 

Am I worrying over nothing?

Am I over thinking what insulation is needed?

We are not living aboard, and if the weather was that cold, we would go home!

We do leave a ‘frost stat heater’ on over winter.

 

 

Thanks.

 

Edited by Nemysys

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9 hours ago, Nemysys said:

I have been told in the past that it is believed the steel used was ‘marine grade’ steel.

Yes, this kind of nonsense is often repeated. 

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13 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

Wot again?

Yes, this kind of nonsense is often repeated. 

Yes, this kind of nonsense is often repeated. 

 

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