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    Milton Keynes

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    BSS Office - communications

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    http://www.boatsafetyscheme.org

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  1. The evidence from the MAIB investigation, other incidents and additional reasearch we are doing - all in the past 15 months - that shows it is a thrid party party issue. And this has coincided with evidence coming through from the health sector that CO in small densities may still be harmful.
  2. You are confusing two separate matters. Ventilation on a boat will protect the ocupants of the boat - put crudely a first party matter. This proposal is about third party protection which the consultation documents spells out in some detail. The consultation documents spell out in some detail that your statement is not correct Dave, not so in this case. It is to protect 'others'
  3. We don't run consultations to tick boxes. All opinions are sought. We look forward to all members of CWDF submissions should they choose to participate. It would be a good thing.
  4. This question is dealt with at length in the consultation and is core to why it is proposed as a requirement and not advice check or remaining as a strong recommendation.
  5. As a BSS Requirement, like all the requirements it becomes one of the things that the navigation authority terms and conditions insist on compliance with anytime the boat is in use on the waterway (as on CRTrust, EA and Broads Auth waters) Comments about cost and benefits and 1st/3rd party protection are answered in the documentation and consultation statements. The links to the supporting documents I can republish here There is further information if you need it in the following documents:- Risk Review and Assessment Paper (26 pages) [Link] An Impact Assessment (summarising our appraisal of the potential impacts of a new BSS Requirement - 8 pages) [Link]
  6. Re CO alarms and other info you post, there are other friendly boating fora, boaters there would be interested. Not everyone visits canalworld. Try logging in on thunderboat.boards.net

    Or get Debbyfiggy to post it for you, apparently she visits regularly. (soz couldn't resist that one ?) meanwhile I'll post it for you. I agree about Co alarms, got 2.

  7. A public consultation on a proposal to introduce mandatory new Boat Safety Scheme (BSS) Requirements for carbon monoxide (CO) alarms on boats opens today Friday 17 August and will run to Friday 9 November 2018. The Boat Safety Scheme (BSS) is running a public consultation on proposals that have the full support of its stakeholder and management committees. It is proposed to introduce a mandatory new BSS Requirement for suitable carbon monoxide (CO) alarms in good condition and in suitable locations on all classes of boat with accommodation spaces. The changes affect all classes of BSS examination, private boats, boats used for hire and other non-private boat classes. The BSS proposals are presented as both necessary and proportionate risk controls and your comments upon them are welcomed. The consultation is open until 16:30 on Friday 9 November 2018. The BSS will also be taking the opportunity to seek the respondent’s views on the future possibility of introducing similar checks concerning smoke alarms for private boats. Please share news of the consultation https://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/abo…/co-alarm-consultation/
  8. Proprietary inbuilt 'diesel' generators - cost of aquisition Portable petrol powered generator - you have to run it off the boat to stay safe, you need to run it downwind of your boat and any nearby boats, they produce deadly amounts of CO even 6-10m away from the exhaust pipe, then there's petrol stowage, petrol safety, strict refuelling regime - ashore, not on the boat. There are upsides, but you know those. So if you go down the portable generator route. Respect your neighbours, respect yourself, look after your genny properly. https://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/stay-safe/generator-safety/
  9. The EA were on the ball with this incident and we were notified within 15 minutes of it happening. We have no certainity whatsoever at the moment as to cause. A 6 or 13 Kg cylinder exploding would have created a very significant force. A camping stove i.e. push to seal 'Gaz' type camping stove exploded on an open deck trailer sailer on the Broads some years ago. The two crew had to be taken to hospital, but the deck was open to the stars and the boat was little damaged. Although gas has been mentioned as the cause, we are not yet ruling out the handling of petrol or petrol system issues as a possible link until all the facts are known. Speculation is usually not helpful in 'the specific' understanding of an incident. Of course it does reveal the various risks that boat owners and crew should be aware of and manage to help keep themselves safe. There's plenty of safety tips on the boatsafetyscheme.org/Stay-Safe pages for anyone feeling a need to refresh or learn new stuff. One thing can be predicted,- the family will surely be devastated and we wish them all the very best for as speedy recovery as possible, although the long term after effects could last for some time.
  10. battery clips, connecting cables, mmmmmmmmm...... ???? - I'd advise anyone thinking about rushing in and waving their plastic at the till, just check everything is appropriate for boats and meets the requirements or think about alternative connection methods if they are not compliant out of the box.
  11. Hi Mike, on that specific point, no an expired (or damaged, or guage in the red, or empty) extinguisher would not invalidate the whole BSS Certification for licensing/registration purposes. However in many of the various bylaws and acts and contract under which the BSS implemented by navigation authorities across the UK, there useually a stipulation that will say something along the lines of '..... you shall maintain the boat to the minimum safety standards specified ... etc, etc, by the BSS Requirements' or expressions similar to that. In other words you would have a duty to navigation authority to have the required number of recognised portable fire extinguishers. [the expiry date passing in this case would mean it's no longer recognised as a fire extinguisher for the purposes of the requirement] The reality is that the navigation authority is unlikely to check this aspect, but could - Super Safety Days on the Broads for example may see an extinguisher being checked. However, if meeting the requirements of the BSS is related to insurance cover, then a dicussion with the insurance broker may be the order of the day - or getting a new fire extinguisher (whichever is easier). Finally, and critically with this particular item, would you trust it to work fully as expected to help you escape if fire broke out on your boat, and thats a personal decision. So my first paragraph is the direct answer, the rest is helpful (or not) context to bear in mind. HTH Rob
  12. Awwww I was just about to say that. Yes exactly. However, our sources at CoGDEM (the manufacturers' association) say that nearly all the models to -1 are the same, just produced and marketed before the -2 testing prcess was finalised. They put the same units through the higher (for boaties purposes) test processes. Why do I say this, to save the money of anyone who feels they have to replace a perfectly valid CO alarm. The hot news is that the list is about to expand. Any day now I'm expecting news of the Firehawk BS EN 50291-2 alarm. I'm planning a social media blast as soon as we have published the new list. Here's the current/old one until then.... BSS CO alarms List Feb 2015.pdf
  13. We are running some tests at the moment with mini four-gas analysers. An examiner stepped aboard a boat and the alert shrilled out. - Upshot: snow had blocked the mushroom vents and CO was starting to build up inside the boat and the occupants were not aware. We're all over faceache and the twittersphere with this message, but your neighbours who are delightfully unconnected to social media may not know or realise the danger. Please can you watch out for them? If you see a boat that has snow all round its roof and/or door vents, and its clear that stove or gas or oil appliance is running, out of community spirit, would you care to let them know if appropriate. BTW - belt and braces job - have you pushed the test button on your CO alarms lately? Keep yourselves safe and cosy from kneepdeepinsnow Norfolk Rob
  14. That would be a seriously cold fridge
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