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1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

Another question from me if you don't mind.

 

Is the baseplate attached at the edges only, or is it plug welded (is that the right term) to prevent it sagging? 

 

Again, apologies if its a silly question. I'm good at them. 

The base plate is welded both sides being turned over after the first weld it is fully welded to the old base plate prior to the new sides being added so the bottom is double welded this tightens up the base plate We find it doesn’t sag and there is no need to plug weld the bottom to the old base plate all of the pressure is downward 

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2 minutes ago, Martin Kedian said:

The base plate is welded both sides being turned over after the first weld it is fully welded to the old base plate prior to the new sides being added so the bottom is double welded this tightens up the base plate We find it doesn’t sag and there is no need to plug weld the bottom to the old base plate all of the pressure is downward 

Thankyou. One final question, and i will leave you alone... Promise. 

 

What thickness plate is used? 

Edited by rusty69

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1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

Thankyou. One final question, and i will leave you alone... Promise. 

 

What thickness plate is used? 

The minimum thickness is 6 mm as this gives longevity most new boats are built in 6 mm this includes the base plate 

some people over plate in 5 mm but I don’t think this is good practice 

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3 minutes ago, Martin Kedian said:

The minimum thickness is 6 mm as this gives longevity most new boats are built in 6 mm this includes the base plate 

some people over plate in 5 mm but I don’t think this is good practice 

Thanks again Martin. 

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Just now, rusty69 said:

Thanks again Martin. 

No worries that’s what forums are for it’s about education so many people never get to ask questions it’s not about generating work. It’s part of my responsibility as a trader 

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4 minutes ago, cereal tiller said:

You would be in good Hands there Rusty ,I am a competent Welder and can state that Martins Work is Excellent and Economic.

Thank you shh no advertising 

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3 hours ago, Martin Kedian said:

I have yet to meet anyone who wants to strip all of the inside to do this. It would not be cost effective. You might as well start with a new sheet 

 

Yes you have. You've met me! Although to be fair the work was done at Brinklow. 

 

Strip out the interior, cut off the scabby and rusted-through riveted iron baseplate and footings, fabricate new 8mm pickled and primed baseplate and footings and stick it on, graft the whole original interior back in. Lovely job which will outlast me, Simon graciously advises.

 

Was it 'cost effective'? Probably not as I could prolly have bought a new sailaway with no personality. Is isn't all about the cost. 

 

 

Edited by Mike the Boilerman

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2 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

 

 

 

Yes you have. You've met me! Although to be fair the work was done at Brinklow. 

 

Strip out the interior, cut off the scabby and rusted-through riveted iron baseplate and footings, fabricate new 8mm pickled and primed baseplate and footings and stick it on, graft the whole original interior back in. Lovely job which will outlast me, Simon graciously advises.

 

Was it 'cost effective'? Probably not as I could prolly have bought a new sailaway with no personality. Is isn't all about the cost. 

 

 

Well done you made the right choice for you and the boat that you are custodian of 

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All interesting stuff, I've never had a problem with the concept of overplating, If I thought that removing the damaged or rotten bits were essential I'd have had a wooden boat (they smell better) Steel is brilliant, you can weld new bits on it.

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5 hours ago, Martin Kedian said:

Well done you made the right choice for you and the boat that you are custodian of 

 

The point I was aiming to make was 'cost effective' is a judgement for the customer to make, not the craftsman. There are people out there who will make cost decisions that make no sense to the craftsman, spending huge sums on old heaps of boats (or old heaps of boilers) in my experience.

 

Sums of money that make no sense if looked at in purely financial terms, but people get attached to their old boats (and their old boilers) and want them fixed regardless of the cost sometimes, and finding someone willing to do that work can be a trial. Why not be that 'someone', do a good job and take the money?! 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

The point I was aiming to make was 'cost effective' is a judgement for the customer to make, not the craftsman. There are people out there who will make cost decisions that make no sense to the craftsman, spending huge sums on old heaps of boats (or old heaps of boilers) in my experience.

 

Sums of money that make no sense if looked at in purely financial terms, but people get attached to their old boats (and their old boilers) and want them fixed regardless of the cost sometimes, and finding someone willing to do that work can be a trial. Why not be that 'someone', do a good job and take the money?! 

 

 

 

I have declined work on the basis that it is not worthwhile doing it  but some people just love their boats and won’t let them go 

Edited by Martin Kedian

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3 minutes ago, Martin Kedian said:

I have declined work on the basis that it is not worthwhile doing it  but some people just love their boats and won’t let them go 

 

Well quite. But why? 

 

Not worth doing in your opinion, but well worth doing in the opinion of the owner.

 

I'm just trying to say see it from the owner's perspective. You're not helping them by refusing to do the work they want done. Just make sure you quote plenty high enough to cover the grief that might come of it. That way is IS worthwhile doing it, for the both of you. 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Well quite. But why? 

 

Not worth doing in your opinion, but well worth doing in the opinion of the owner.

 

I'm just trying to say see it from the owner's perspective. You're not helping them by refusing to do the work they want done. Just make sure you quote plenty high enough to cover the grief that might come of it. That way is IS worthwhile doing it, for the both of you. 

 

 

Sometimes they are not able to be saved it terminal and trying to over plate it is not possible they owner wants to keep the inside intact and it isn’t safe  to repair it 

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Hi,

Do you ever get boats that a so called 'surveyor' has said 'needs overplating'  when really it has only lost 2mm or less and still has year and years of service to give, but the owners has been panicked by a bad survey(or)?

 

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In some of the pictures it looks like the new plates are continuously welded along the top, but stitched on with only around 50% of the seam welded at the base plate. Is this correct, or am I misinterpreting? If it is correct, what are the reasons for doing that?

Thanks for posting the pics and answering questions. Fascinating stuff. Every day is a school day.

 

Jen

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12 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

In some of the pictures it looks like the new plates are continuously welded along the top, but stitched on with only around 50% of the seam welded at the base plate. Is this correct, or am I misinterpreting? If it is correct, what are the reasons for doing that?

Thanks for posting the pics and answering questions. Fascinating stuff. Every day is a school day.

 

Jen

Looks to me like the base plate is fully welded along the bottom, then a round reinforcing bar is welded along, like a sacrificial edge, hence the spaces.

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25 minutes ago, Canal321 said:

Hi,

Do you ever get boats that a so called 'surveyor' has said 'needs overplating'  when really it has only lost 2mm or less and still has year and years of service to give, but the owners has been panicked by a bad survey(or)?

 

Yes often which is why I use a surveyor with a sensible head  

2 minutes ago, Mike Hurley said:

Looks to me like the base plate is fully welded along the bottom, then a round reinforcing bar is welded along, like a sacrificial edge, hence the spaces.

Yes fully welded and a 20 mm sacrificial wear bar  stiched in place which if needed can be replaced 

Edited by Martin Kedian
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2 minutes ago, Martin Kedian said:

 

Yes fully welded and a 20 mm sacrificial wear bar  stiched in place which if needed can be replaced 

Thanks. That makes sense. Extends and renews the wear edge of the baseplate to take account of the extra thickness of the sides.

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3 minutes ago, Martin Kedian said:

Yes often which is why I use a surveyor with a sensible head  

Yes fully welded and a 20 mm sacrificial wear bar  stiched in place which if needed can be replaced 

As someone who has been in the motor trade for 43 years, i can say that looks like some seriously good welding on there.

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15 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Thanks. That makes sense. Extends and renews the wear edge of the baseplate to take account of the extra thickness of the sides.

The wear edge was gone so I folded the side sheets and welded them between the new and old base plate 

16 minutes ago, Mike Hurley said:

As someone who has been in the motor trade for 43 years, i can say that looks like some seriously good welding on there.

Thank you very much 

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Can I ask if you have a hull with no fold/taper in sides  original base plate 6' 10"or there abouts wide & you extended base plate put your 20mm wear bar that takes the OA widt h to 10 mm/3/8" under 7'(sorry for the metric /imp mix )have you every had problems as this makes it the widest pat of the boat& possibly wider than the built as new beam (Thinking in terms of some of the banana locks)

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1 hour ago, Martin Kedian said:

Sometimes they are not able to be saved it terminal and trying to over plate it is not possible they owner wants to keep the inside intact and it isn’t safe  to repair it 

Yes,but,with respect,you are advising with your head. MtB is speaking from his heart,and heart and head are sometimes contradictory.

I would guess that a boat could be saved by cutting away all of the old hull,and completely re-hulling. I shudder to think what the cost would be,but if I was the owner of a boat that needed this,I would remove anything of value and sell it for scrap and sadly take the financial hit and if I had any money left,buy another boat.

I hope it never comes to this,because I do fully understand MtB's feelings on this.

My little boat has taken me through rain,fog,snow,sleet,hail,iced canals,and shallow water,and I do feel some loyalty to her.

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Very nearly Thirty years ago myself and two friends built our first narrow boat from scratch. Although not a welder I was an engineer with an ability to weld. So were the other two guys. 

From the photographs presented it seams to me that the work is of excellent quality from someone who cares about the finished job. Also from the replies to the many questions it is someone with a deep knowledge of what he does. 

Should I ever need to have my boat over-plated I would not hesitate to let him do it. 

I have never used his services nor had any sort of contact with him other than what I have seen of his work.

Just keep on doing it. Boats need guys like you.

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