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15 minutes ago, Pastida@1 said:

Thanks for that input.  Very positive information to think about 

Your welcome

To suppliment your 600w solar panels instead of a wind turbine why not consider these

https://midsummerenergy.co.uk/buy/peelnstick_solar_panels/unisolar_pvl136_peel_n_stick_solar_panel

I have  2 of them at the back of the boat one on each side. I also have 2x175w normal solar panels at the front of the boat. This layout gives me a clear roof where i need it i.e 3/4s of the roof is clear for me to use when locking. The Unisolars are very tough, unlike many stick on flexible panels, and can be walked on, although best not to if avoidable, they are very discreet and also cannot be removed easily once installed so are unlikely to go walkabouts. They are not as efficient as a regular mono solar panel for the space required but as a supplement to the main solar panels I think they are a better buy than a wind turbine.  

 

Edited by reg
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Wind turbines just don't seem to work well on canals, too much mechanical friction for the wind caused by trees etc makes for a lot of turbulence and gusts, not the steady strong wind you might get on a lumpy water location. Also they are quite noisy so are a nuisance to other boats moored nearby and of course this nuisance may continue all night.

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1 hour ago, smiler said:

Is that the only negative for wind power - vibration through the boat?

No. Extremely poor cost/generation ratio and a load of hassle are two more.

Many folk have posted on here over the years who tried it and got rid of it. 

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1 minute ago, WotEver said:

No. Extremely poor cost/generation ratio and a load of hassle are two more.

Many folk have posted on here over the years who tried it and got rid of it. 

Ok - thanks for the answer

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On 08/10/2017 at 19:55, Pastida@1 said:

Thanks for that input.  Very positive information to think about 

Still like to hear from anyone who has ever had a decent wind generator on their boat. Vibration is easy to stop with right mountings but need to know if it's worth the money 

 

Wind generators need a steady and continuous breeze of circa 30mph to anything approaching their rated output. 

Stick your head out the door now. Do you you have a steady 30mph wind blowing? Check again tomorrow, and the next day, and the next. IF you get a series of YES answers then go for it.

'Worth the money' is a subjective judgement only you can make. Is 5AH per month for an outlay of £1,200 worth the money? How many AH per month would you get for the same outlay on more solar?

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16 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Wind generators need a steady and continuous breeze of circa 30mph to anything approaching their rated output. 

Stick your head out the door now. Do you you have a steady 30mph wind blowing? Check again tomorrow, and the next day, and the next. IF you get a series of YES answers then go for it.

'Worth the money' is a subjective judgement only you can make. Is 5AH per month for an outlay of £1,200 worth the money? How many AH per month would you get for the same outlay on more solar?

We had a wind genny on our lumpy water boat and used it from Scotland to Greece and all points in between. I would say you needed 15 knot sustained winds to get useful power (18 mph). Total waste of time on the cut as too many trees and most canals well inland. Maybe useful 10% of the time. We look for peaceful places to moor for the night, not exposed gale-ridden locations. 

.....and as others have said, too noisy (blade noise that cannot be stopped) and not suited to canals where you have to have a system to put them up and down for cruising / mooring. Not a good idea on NBs which is why no one has them. Ok on a lumpy water boat which is why you see them in boaty mags.

Did I mention SUSTAINED winds of 15 knots? That is pretty windy.

  • Greenie 1
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24 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Wind generators need a steady and continuous breeze of circa 30mph to anything approaching their rated output. 

Stick your head out the door now. Do you you have a steady 30mph wind blowing? Check again tomorrow, and the next day, and the next. IF you get a series of YES answers then go for it.

'Worth the money' is a subjective judgement only you can make. Is 5AH per month for an outlay of £1,200 worth the money? How many AH per month would you get for the same outlay on more solar?

I don`t think anyone would suggest wind instead of solar - more as a back-up to solar on dull days

In the winter you would probably, on average, have only a few hours of sun, whereas the wind could blow 24 hours a day(even if it is the wrong type of wind)

As stated in earlier posts vibration is probably an issue and noise affecting other boats nearby - by the way, running an engine to boost batteries also makes noise.

I guess it`s swings and roundabouts whether wind is worth using

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3 minutes ago, smiler said:

I guess it`s swings and roundabouts whether wind is worth using

Having now had a succession of posts explaining that it’s a waste of time on the canals why do you persist in believing that it’s ‘swings and roundabouts’?  

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Just now, WotEver said:

Having now had a succession of posts explaining that it’s a waste of time on the canals why do you persist in believing that it’s ‘swings and roundabouts’?  

Swings and roundabouts = pluses and minuses

Plus...

After initial outlay + maintenance costs = a way to trickle a bit of charge into your batteries if the sun don`t shine for a couple of weeks

An alternative to running an engine to boost empty batteries

 

Minus...

Initial outlay

Noise/vibration

 

I appreciate the "it's a waste of time comment" but for me personally it could be used as a back-up

People used to tell me there was a tooth-fairy - you don`t always have to believe everything you're told. :rolleyes:

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33 minutes ago, smiler said:

Swings and roundabouts = pluses and minuses

Plus...

After initial outlay + maintenance costs = a way to trickle a bit of charge into your batteries if the sun don`t shine for a couple of weeks

An alternative to running an engine to boost empty batteries

 

Minus...

Initial outlay

Noise/vibration

 

I appreciate the "it's a waste of time comment" but for me personally it could be used as a back-up

People used to tell me there was a tooth-fairy - you don`t always have to believe everything you're told. :rolleyes:

But do you have one? If not then what are your reasons for not having one? 

Here's a test

Budget £1200

Objective generate current to charge batteries ON A NARROWBOAT

What do you consider is the most cost effective way of achieving your objective? 

For me I can achieve the majority of the objective for less than £1200

Edited by reg
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3 minutes ago, reg said:

But do you have one? If not then what are your reasons for not having one? 

Here's a test

Budget £1200

Objective generate current to charge batteries ON A NARROWBOAT

What do you consider is the most cost effective way of achieving your objective? 

For me I can achieve the majority of the objective for less than £1200

Errr...

No I don`t have one - because I don't have a NB yet.

Who mentioned 1200 quid? - I certainly didn`t. Small (200W) wind generators(incl charge controller) can be had from 175 pounds from ebay.

I consider the most cost effective way of achieving my objective(topping up batteries when the sun don't shine enough) over, say, a 15 year period of liveaboard could be possibly wind, closely followed by boat engine or generator.

I`m not sure what your objective was?

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Just now, smiler said:

Errr...

No I don`t have one - because I don't have a NB yet.

Who mentioned 1200 quid? - I certainly didn`t. Small (200W) wind generators(incl charge controller) can be had from 175 pounds from ebay.

I consider the most cost effective way of achieving my objective(topping up batteries when the sun don't shine enough) over, say, a 15 year period of liveaboard could be possibly wind, closely followed by boat engine or generator.

I`m not sure what your objective was?

Ok what ever works for you

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8 hours ago, smiler said:

Errr...

No I don`t have one - because I don't have a NB yet.

Who mentioned 1200 quid? - I certainly didn`t. Small (200W) wind generators(incl charge controller) can be had from 175 pounds from ebay.

I consider the most cost effective way of achieving my objective(topping up batteries when the sun don't shine enough) over, say, a 15 year period of liveaboard could be possibly wind, closely followed by boat engine or generator.

I`m not sure what your objective was?

Please don't park next to us with your 175squid wind genny. On the very infrequent nights when there is sufficient wind and we are parked in the wind, I don't want to be kept awake by your cheap Jenny. My experience In wind gennys is that you get what you pay for an if you are looking for silent and 15 years then you are talking expensive. Sleeping in a boat next to one with a cheap genny can be a very unpleasant experience. 

It is not swings and roundabouts. They don't work well on canals. That's why you don't see them.

  • Greenie 1
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On 09/10/2017 at 09:44, WotEver said:

Q.E.D.

 

There is however, a tendency amongst newbies to think they are the first person on the canal system to have the idea (about wind gennys, built in petrol gennys, or whatever the subject). 

I certainly tended to do this when new to boating and fairly quickly learned that new ideas that are 'not done', generally turn out to be not done because they don't actually work. 

On 09/10/2017 at 09:47, Pastida@1 said:

More against wind than for it but it's free so will stick to solar to start with and look at wind if I need to. 

Great replies guys

Cheers

John 

 

And bear in mind the one person arguing in favour of wind does not own a boat!! 

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2 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

There is however, a tendency amongst newbies to think they are the first person on the canal system to have the idea (about wind gennys, built in petrol gennys, or whatever the subject). 

I certainly tended to do this when new to boating and fairly quickly learned that new ideas that are 'not done', generally turn out to be not done because they don't actually work. 

 

And bear in mind the one person arguing in favour of wind does not own a boat!! 

I guess I fell into the newbie trap:mellow:

I will bow down to the superior knowledge of the forum members in future :argue:

Thanks for the warm welcome :cheers:

  • Greenie 1
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1 minute ago, Pastida@1 said:

I still think wind power has a future on narrowboats if a few issues can be overcome lol :)

Possibly, especially if global warming increases the average wind speeds for the UK. :P

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