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Who lives in a house (boat) like this?


Frog Man
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Being a single bloke I just wondered if this sort of craft was at all suitable as a liveaboard (ignoring the outboard engine.) Its 27ft and on the face of it I like it, or at least something very similar. Does anyone currently live on, or have experience of staying on anything similar in the long term? Apologies that the photo is ar$£ upwards. :-)

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Being a single bloke I just wondered if this sort of craft was at all suitable as a liveaboard (ignoring the outboard engine.)

 

Ignoring the outboard engine is a BIG mistake. On a liveaboard you need an inboard engine to charge the batteries and (possibly) heat the water. You'll have neither with an outboard.

  • Greenie 1
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27 Feet,

 

Take off 6 or 7 feet for the front

Take off 6 feet for the back (engine and gearbox - OK this is an OB but that is not a practical alternative)

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the bathroom

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the kitchen

 

Leaves 7 feet for the living room and bedroom (normally the same room in a small boat)

 

We had a 30 foot Nb and no way would we be able to 'liveaboard'

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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In a mains electric marina it would be tight for space but adequate for one, anywhere else and the electricity generation available from and outboard and the total lack of heat into the cabin would make it impossible in my opinion -Oh! then there is the issue of petrol stored for movement which is onerous to do in compliance with BSS but possible, then the fact that petrol is rare on the cut (easier on the Thames) and at least double the price of red diesel.

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A bloke on the K&A lives in a short of floating shed quite a bit shorter than this, no engine at all, he moves it along with a pole, or rather a branch from a tree. He always looks happy when we pass, and survived the winter very easily.

Its all about what level of comfort you want.

 

..............Dave

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27 Feet,

 

Take off 6 or 7 feet for the front

Take off 6 feet for the back (engine and gearbox - OK this is an OB but that is not a practical alternative)

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the bathroom

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the kitchen

 

Leaves 7 feet for the living room and bedroom (normally the same room in a small boat)

 

We had a 30 foot Nb and no way would we be able to 'liveaboard'

This is only slightly shorter than the back cabin of a working boat in which a family would live. I lived in a back cabin for several years and I was very comfortable, the lack of space helping to focus the mind on what possessions are important and what are not.

 

By comparison the dimensions you list above appear palatial captain.gif

Edited by pete harrison
  • Greenie 1
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27 Feet,

 

Take off 6 or 7 feet for the front

Take off 6 feet for the back (engine and gearbox - OK this is an OB but that is not a practical alternative)

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the bathroom

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the kitchen

 

Leaves 7 feet for the living room and bedroom (normally the same room in a small boat)

 

We had a 30 foot Nb and no way would we be able to 'liveaboard'

I know someone who lives on a boat roughly half this size. About 14ft id guess. Needless to say he doesn't have a kitchen or bathroom.

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I moved a 31ft Mike Heywood boat called Schilling which you could easily live aboard on.

He did 3 the same size and managed to fit berths for 4, wet room, solid fuel stove and proper kitchen and full size bed with a tug deck front.

It opened my eyes on what was possible to fit into a boat this length and still be an enjoyable fun motor.

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My cruiser has a fwd cabin with a double berth, wardrobe (tiny) and three decent size storage drawers

galley with cooker (2 ring) oven and grill. sink and drainer (split worktop folding down over either or both)

toilet compartment (converted to wet room on some) twin dinettes aft with seating/tables for four folding down to give 2 single bunks.

2 cyl diesel engine (under kitchen sink) 1 engine battery 2 leisure batteries

 

and the size? ............24'6" x 6'4"

 

at our moorings a couple lived on an identical boat for 2 years (on mains electric)......I should add that although I love my cruiser and spend long periods cruising it there is no way on this earth I could live on it full time.

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Which layout do you have in mind? http://www.littleboatco.co.uk/layouts.html

 

Richard

Looking at that link, there are only two layouts with inboards.

One is 24ft and one is 26ft. I think they can modify the layouts tho, because the layout on one I first posted looks to be a variation of the ones pictured.

Edited by Frog Man
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My cruiser is 36 feet long.

In the bow there are 3 bunks, a wardrobe and 3 underbed lockers

Next is a Shower room, toilet and sink

Next there is a fully fitted kitchen with fridge, double oven, grill, hob, sink, microwave, numerous cupboards, shelves and overhead cupboards

Then we have a 4 seater 'dining room' that converts to another double bed.

Up 5 steps to the Saloon, seating for 6.

Down 5 steps to the master suite including queen sized bed, bathroom with toilet, separate shower room, 4 wardrobes, 2 dressing tables, varios cupboards and underbed storage.

Under the saloon floor are 2x 6 litre, 6 cylinder diesel engines.

 

It may be only 36 feet long, but it is 14 feet wide and 10 feet high with everything folded down.

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It's all about what you feel you need to live comfortably (in terms of both facilities and space), and how well-planned the boat is. This is a bit misleading:

 

Take off 6 or 7 feet for the front

Take off 6 feet for the back (engine and gearbox - OK this is an OB but that is not a practical alternative)

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the bathroom

Take off 4 feet (at least) for the kitchen

 

- because many (most?) very small boats fit in a small bathroom/wet room opposite the galley, so that both might fit in the same 4ft of cabin length; and some, like Springer Waterbugs, have very small (3-4ft)? front decks and a completely enclosed cabin, meaning more internal cabin length and no need to keep a "corridor" free of furniture to access the front doors.

 

Our old narrowboat was 24ft, with about 14ft of internal space, and I can certainly see how a single person could have lived aboard if it weren't for the electricity issue (it had an outboard). The layout included a fixed single berth/seat and wet room with shower, both opposite a long row of kitchen units, then a living area with a stove and seating/removable table that converted to a double bed. No hanging space, but plenty of storage under all the seats and the front deck, and in the galley. Plus a big enough front deck to sit out on.

 

Plenty of people can and do live on boats of a similar size. It's all relative - even a big narrowboat is small compared to a house, but even a small narrowboat is big compared to, say, a camper van. People manage to live in all sorts of small spaces, and at least these small spaces have cooking facilities, toilets, showers, insulation, electricity and water on tap. Oh, and absolutely huge gardens.wink.png

Edited by magictime
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Grebe is 26 ft. When talking to non-boaty people we usually say that the living space is the about the same as two 'normal' garden sheds. Yes you can live on her but but not long term and CCing. Two weeks used to be our limit.

 

All the areas have to work hard, no fixed double bed etc

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SNIP>. It's all relative - even a big narrowboat is small compared to a house, but even a small narrowboat is big compared to, say, a camper van. People manage to live in all sorts of small spaces, and at least these small spaces have cooking facilities, toilets, showers, insulation, electricity and water on tap. Oh, and absolutely huge gardens.wink.png

 

My Humber Barge has a lot more sqft of living space than the 2 bed Victorian semi than I last lived in, no garden shed of course but I do have a nice big engine room to play in.

I don't know how people can manage to live in such cramped accommodation as a house k07039.gif

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