Jump to content

Rope diameter for a centre line


DarrenG

Featured Posts

Just a plug for rope shackles to connect them to the roof fitting.  I was converted to them last summer.

 

I also have a large loop (about one metre circumference) spliced in the end. Very handy for dropping over a bollard (or around my waist if I want to pretend to be a bollard).  And just short enough to not get tangled in the prop.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Seriously ?

That's fine on the cut. It's actually quite strong but needs regular inspection for chafing. Worth putting lengths of bicycle innertube on the spliced eyes and where is runs over the deck edge..

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Seriously ?

If I’ve measured proper yeah. 
Hemp. 
 

I guess if I were on a river or somewhere a tad tidal I’d use something a bit more substantial. 
 

Been using them for 5 or 6 year now. 
Easier to put a few turns around a T stud. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Presumably you mean hemp style polypropylene. 

 

You can get real hemp rope but I don't think it will last that long unless kept inside when not used. 

This Rombull rope is nice. 4 strand nylon with a centre core and very stretchy. Also nice on the hands although it does age quite quickly. Would make good bondage rope I think as it is soft like cotton. 

 

Rombull 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/322627723372

 

 

Also good bow hauling line. 

 

 

It is an unusual lay and not that easy to splice. You need to do more tucks than usual and ideally tape the ends of the strands. 

Edited by magnetman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, magnetman said:

That's fine on the cut. It's actually quite strong but needs regular inspection for chafing. Worth putting lengths of bicycle innertube on the spliced eyes and where is runs over the deck edge..

 

 

 

 

In daily use so keep my eye on them. 
Spliced my eyes to slip over the dollies at the back, so quite often no tying needed either. 

3 minutes ago, magnetman said:

Presumably you mean hemp style polypropylene. 

 

Ok, I think what I am referring to could actually be called Jute. 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Goliath said:

If I’ve measured proper yeah. 
Hemp. 
 

I guess if I were on a river or somewhere a tad tidal I’d use something a bit more substantial. 
 

Been using them for 5 or 6 year now. 
Easier to put a few turns around a T stud. 

 

I find anything less than about 16mm 'impossible' to handle - cannot grip it and cannot pull it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16mm, all around. Two on the centre, two on bow, one on the stern. The two on the centre are to avoid snagging on the solar panels and centre fixtures. Use them all the time. Jump off with a centre line. It's like owning a horse, I imagine. 

 

 

Edited by Higgs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Goliath said:

In daily use so keep my eye on them. 
Spliced my eyes to slip over the dollies at the back, so quite often no tying needed either. 

Ok, I think what I am referring to could actually be called Jute. 
 

 

Unlikely to be jute. 

 

I think you might have Hempex which is a furry and slightly softer type of staple spun polypropylene rope. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not jute?

It feels very much like natural fibres. 

 

where as my centre rope is 100% plastic there is little give in it, if it snatches on a bollard it brings the boat to a nasty stop, as you described earlier. 
 

I’ve never given any of it much thought. Ropes are either found or given. 
The 10mm brown rope I bought for it was cheap as chips and I got myself 30m or more from Macsalvors Redruth. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe it is Jute. I would be surprised it had lasted 5 years. Do you store it inside when not in use? 

 

 

The imitation hemp rope does feel and look like natural rope that's why it is called Hempex. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No the rope stays outside. 
 

Mind, I bought such a good length that I have been able to experiment over those years to find what’s the best length for me to use. 
 

So I have swopped and changed from the bulk of it which was kept in side. 
 

So perhaps what I’m using now has been in use outside for 2 or 3 years. 🤷‍♀️and still going strong. 
 

Next time I’m in a chandlers I’ll have a proper look. And investigate 🧐 to see exactly what’s what. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

I find anything less than about 16mm 'impossible' to handle - cannot grip it and cannot pull it.


I’m a lazy sod, if I can find another way without pulling the rope I will. 
Canals are (usually) so gentle there’s no need for any huffing and puffing.


Sea boats and river boats  a different matter maybe. 

 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, magnetman said:

I googled the place. Looks like a pretty wicked shop. 


Macsalvors?

Yes great place. 
They’re primarily a crane hire company but they have a cracking shop in Pool, Redruth. 

I try and visit when I’m down there just to see what they got on offer. 
 

Another place I found was a chandlers in Newlyn which is good for epoxy paints, cheaper than canal chandlers by 10 or 20 pound a tin. 
 

Always worth popping in these places when visiting down there.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My centre handling line is 10mm braided yacht halyard. If there's a case for anything thicker, whether for handling comfort or for strength, I've yet to find it. 

Need I say I don't moor with it?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.