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Boat mover daily rates?


noddyboater

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1 hour ago, Phlea said:

Related to this thread I think, I'm having a boat moved down south soon on a 'day rate' but was wondering how this compares to cranage and road transport? What's a ball park figure for this?

 

 

Where are you moving from and too?

What type and size of boat?

How quickly do you need the move/want the boat delivered?

Does the day rate include non movement due to stoppages?

Obviously the daylight hours are less this time of the year, so obviously going to be longer to deliver compared to Summer months. So day rate should be less?

7 minutes ago, MtB said:

I had my boat moved from Rugby to Reading by Tuckeys about ten years ago. All-in price including the crane both ends was £1,800, IIRC. 

Yes and diesel was 70p per Ltr compared to £1.80per Ltr today😂

Edited by PD1964
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3 minutes ago, matty40s said:

...and Tuckeys cranes are now forced to use White diesel rather than the red they uses to run on, which at £1.90 pl average is a bit of a stinker when it does 7mpg.

 

The Tuckey crane turned up at the Rugby end but they arranged and paid for the EA cradle lift at the Reading end.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

The Tuckey crane turned up at the Rugby end but they arranged and paid for the EA cradle lift at the Reading end.

 

 

But that was 10 years ago😂 completely irrelevant in today’s real world prices.

10 minutes ago, matty40s said:

...and Tuckeys cranes are now forced to use White diesel rather than the red they uses to run on, which at £1.90 pl average is a bit of a stinker when it does 7mpg.

I think people don’t realise how much things have gone up in price.

Edited by PD1964
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9 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

But that was 10 years ago😂 completely irrelevant in today’s real world prices.

I think people don’t realise how much things have gone up in price.

 

I think you don't realise how much people appreciate how much things have gone up in price. 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

Couldn’t be ars@d, have learnt there’s more to life then money.

 

Quite right, which is why your comment I quoted and took the p!ss out of is all the more puzzling.

 

 

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1 minute ago, MtB said:

 

Quite right, which is why your comment I quoted and took the p!ss out of is all the more puzzling.

 

 

What was more puzzling was your 10 year old reference for your price for boat moving. 

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9 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

If its on day rate, lets hope he doesn't treat it as a holiday

A decent boat mover should/would only charge days moving and this time of year with the shortened daylight he would still be on a good number.

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5 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

A decent boat mover should/would only charge days moving and this time of year with the shortened daylight he would still be on a good number.

I confess that a long while ago we moved a couple of boats for free, or just a little financial gift. It was for friends so we didn't think about insurance because people lend boats to friends all the time. It was much harder than we expected due to needing to do repairs as we went along, and (maybe foolishly) taking a boat onto tne Thames that had beed static for a fair while. At the time I did not know that professional boat movers existed. At the other extreme hire conpanies often need to relocate their boats at the start/end of the season so they give a reduction in the hire cost to hirers willing to do a (sometimes longish) one way trip...yes, you pay them to move their boats for them.

 

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2 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

I reckon £1000 would shift a narrowboat pretty much anywhere -

Cost us quite a lot more than that to move a 70 footer 25 miles earlier this year. And that was with sharing the cost with other boats being craned in and out at each end.

Edited by David Mack
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10 hours ago, PD1964 said:

A decent boat mover should/would only charge days moving and this time of year with the shortened daylight he would still be on a good number.

Not everyone offering a service on the canal is decent, unfortunately. I have seen and spoken to good ones, and bad ones, like the one who said "I am a professional boat mover, I don't close lock gates" and the one I let get ahead who had called it a day by lunch time.

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11 hours ago, PD1964 said:

A decent boat mover should/would only charge days moving and this time of year with the shortened daylight he would still be on a good number.

I've just moved a boat from the South Oxford up to the T&M, as a favour of course because it's not my job. 

If it was my job however I certainly wouldn't call it a "good number" especially at this time of year.  Dodging stoppages,  an hour or two in the dark at each end of the day,  added to that I had a boat with no water, gas or electric the first night,  and then needed the fuel filter cleaning every couple of hours due to shite in the tank.

The solitude wouldn't suit some people either,  12 hours at the tiller with often nothing more than a nod or Hello to a passing rambler. 

Luckily that's why pubs were invented. 

 

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1 minute ago, noddyboater said:

I've just moved a boat from the South Oxford up to the T&M, as a favour of course because it's not my job. 

If it was my job however I certainly wouldn't call it a "good number" especially at this time of year.  Dodging stoppages,  an hour or two in the dark at each end of the day,  added to that I had a boat with no water, gas or electric the first night,  and then needed the fuel filter cleaning every couple of hours due to shite in the tank.

The solitude wouldn't suit some people either,  12 hours at the tiller with often nothing more than a nod or Hello to a passing rambler. 

Luckily that's why pubs were invented. 

 

That’s what I like the solitude of long solo days on the tiller, it obviously depends on the state of the boat to how enjoyable it is. 

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16 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

That’s what I like the solitude of long solo days on the tiller, it obviously depends on the state of the boat to how enjoyable it is. 

I love a good long day on my own boat,  and often plan trips around them. 

It's different if you're moving someone else's,  not as relaxing I suppose. Planning ahead to not get caught out in a dodgy spot for the night for example, seems more important when it's not your boat. 

Even a short stop for something essential can set you back,  worse still having a crawling cretin pull out in front of you..

You do get to cruise the dawn and dusk though,  which makes up for everything. 

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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

.... and the one I let get ahead who had called it a day by lunch time.

That does smack of someone playing at it, but would only be significant if he was charging a day rate - not if it was being done to a job price.

 

Tam

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1 hour ago, noddyboater said:

Planning ahead to not get caught out in a dodgy spot for the night for example, seems more important when it's not your boat. 

I fond that if you set off early and carry on into the dark you can moor more or less anywhere as the scrotes won't know you are there, and you'll be long gone before they surface next day.

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49 minutes ago, David Mack said:

I fond that if you set off early and carry on into the dark you can moor more or less anywhere as the scrotes won't know you are there, and you'll be long gone before they surface next day.

That's often the case, but if keeping moving involves a flight of locks in the dark, single handed through  a dodgy area I'd rather not.

On the last moving favour I did for instance I'd happily done Curdworth in the dark,  but made an effort the day after to be at the Black Country museum moorings by 6pm.

 

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13 hours ago, David Mack said:

Cost us quite a lot more than that to move a 70 footer 25 miles earlier this year. And that was with sharing the cost with other boats being craned in and out at each end.

A year ago, I think mine cost £1400 to move.

plus cranes

and cranes can be anywhere between £200 and £500+, 

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2 hours ago, Goliath said:

A year ago, I think mine cost £1400 to move.

plus cranes

and cranes can be anywhere between £200 and £500+, 

  If the Yard has a resident crane, if not to get one in for one lift is expensive and then you need to find a yard that will do it.
 Often the yard will also charge you as they may need to move equipment/boats to create enough access and canal side space for transporter and crane.

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Thanks for all the sage advice.  It seems it'll be much cheaper to hire the skipper to move it.  Just feels a bit of a leap of faith though, entrusting my new purchase to someone else for a couple of weeks whereas a crane feels less 'risky'.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Phlea said:

Thanks for all the sage advice.  It seems it'll be much cheaper to hire the skipper to move it.  Just feels a bit of a leap of faith though, entrusting my new purchase to someone else for a couple of weeks whereas a crane feels less 'risky'.

 

Crane and lorry IS less risky, which is why I use that method whenever I need a boat moved, if I can afford it.

 

I don't think your boat is likely to get stolen for example, but if it breaks down on the trip the boat mover still needs paying and YOU now have a problem with YOUR boat broken down possibly many miles away...

 

 

 

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