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12 minutes ago, system 4-50 said:

Save me researching.  How old, how long, and, crucially, what toilet type?

Hi it’s 1986 boat

55 ft 

cassette toilet 

 

5 minutes ago, PaulJ said:

Hope it goes well for you 👍

Thank you

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3 hours ago, Feeby100 said:

I hope all ok it’s just a hull survey 

 

2 hours ago, Feeby100 said:

it’s 1986 boat

 

Just a hull survey may not be accepted by some insurance companies for comprehensive insurance on a boat of that age.

 

Ask your surveyor for an insurance survey or a pre-purchase survey.  They will cost a little bit more as he'll need to check more things, but if you've already got the boat out of the water and the surveyor onsite doing the hull survey it shouldn't add a huge amount to your existing costs.

  • Greenie 1
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43 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

 

Just a hull survey may not be accepted by some insurance companies for comprehensive insurance on a boat of that age.

 

Ask your surveyor for an insurance survey or a pre-purchase survey.  They will cost a little bit more as he'll need to check more things, but if you've already got the boat out of the water and the surveyor onsite doing the hull survey it shouldn't add a huge amount to your existing costs.

Or even ask your insurance company what they require

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39 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

 

Just a hull survey may not be accepted by some insurance companies for comprehensive insurance on a boat of that age.

 

Ask your surveyor for an insurance survey or a pre-purchase survey.  They will cost a little bit more as he'll need to check more things, but if you've already got the boat out of the water and the surveyor onsite doing the hull survey it shouldn't add a huge amount to your existing costs.

O ok thanks 

I have a ring first thing to insurance company’s to ask about this 

I just google some any suggestions on a good insurance company

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Hi 

It had a coupe of bit to be sorted 

1. Install rudder stops

2. Replace the Sacrificial metal to the sides of the base plate as worn 

3. Plate over a small area on port side by water line.

4. Reweld butt joint  on base plate or plate over with 6mm strip and seam weld as weld was not great in survey opinion so that’s good he pick this up 

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5 minutes ago, Feeby100 said:

Hi 

It had a coupe of bit to be sorted 

1. Install rudder stops

2. Replace the Sacrificial metal to the sides of the base plate as worn 

3. Plate over a small area on port side by water line.

4. Reweld butt joint  on base plate or plate over with 6mm strip and seam weld as weld was not great in survey opinion so that’s good he pick this up 

 

What sort of survey did you end up getting ?

 

Hull only ?

Insurance survey ?

Purchase survey and valuation ?

 

Did you speak to your insurers to identify what level of survbey they wanted ?

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Hi 

I ask the insurance and they all said a hull only would be fine.

And one did not need a survey at all as long as I have it done 

 

 

 

 

2 minutes ago, MrsM said:

Well worth having the survey. Is that more or less what you were expecting?

Yes I guess so as a old boat but the metal thinkness was good all over 

  • Happy 1
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It's worth having a mechanic/engineer look over the boat too, as surveyors do miss things. I had a full survey done on my boat prior to purchase, but before I'd gone over it with a fine toothed comb. Surveyor picked up the fact the back door had been leaking water and rotted the doorframe under the lining but missed that the battery isolator switch didn't actually isolate the house electrics, a gaping hole in the stove flange at the back, a faulty alternator, water in the gearbox oil and a hole in the engine exhaust. Bargaining on those points got me almost £2k off and the wood replaced and bilge painted.

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A 'Full Survey' would normally cover both the boat and the drive train (hence full survey). The Only full survey I have ever had done included oil samples being sent off for anaylsis for carbons, bits of metal etc etc (and whatever else they look for). It will also check the gearbox condition, shaft and prop.

 

As it turned out, the surveyor did the survey from inside the marina office, with it getting a superb report. It was subsequently found that there was water in the gearboxes, one of the Turbo's was 'blown up' and it was stuck in gear.

£20,000+ to correct the problems.

 

I have never had a survey on a boat since.

 

A 'survey' will not normally consist of anything that cannot be seen, requires tools to access, doors to be opened, or carpets lifted.

 

As usual, each surveyors idea of a 'survey' or a 'full survey' may vary, and it is always a good idea to get the 'menu' from your chosen surveyor for what is included and not included so you know what to expect.

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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Feel a bit of sympathy for surveyors. So much of a boat is hidden, inaccessible, impossible to tell the condition, engine internals and so on. I reckon a surveyor who picks up poor welding on a base plate butt weld has at lest looked properly and done OK. Not sure about the 'sacrificial metal' bit. I think its just a fabricators way of making it easier to weld the sides on but I don't suppose I'll ever win that argument.

  • Greenie 1
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On 07/04/2021 at 14:32, Feeby100 said:

Hi 

It had a coupe of bit to be sorted 

1. Install rudder stops

2. Replace the Sacrificial metal to the sides of the base plate as worn 

3. Plate over a small area on port side by water line.

4. Reweld butt joint  on base plate or plate over with 6mm strip and seam weld as weld was not great in survey opinion so that’s good he pick this up 

Does this mean that the entire weld around the circumference of the baseplate needs redoing or just a portion of it, and the sacrificial metal i presume is the overhang past the hull side? That is quite an extensive repair if so.

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1 hour ago, Bee said:

Not sure about the 'sacrificial metal' bit. I think its just a fabricators way of making it easier to weld the sides on but I don't suppose I'll ever win that argument.

 

You are correct, but it does protect the seam weld too.

 

21 minutes ago, BWM said:

the sacrificial metal i presume is the overhang past the hull side? That is quite an extensive repair if so.

 

 

Nah, a lot of boats need it doing either through age or scraping against rock/stone.

 

The usual trick is to weld a length of bar along the join so it protects the seam weld between the baseplate and the hull sides.  This is accepted by all the surveyors.

 

 

Edited by TheBiscuits
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36 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

You are correct, but it does protect the seam weld too.

 

 

 

Nah, a lot of boats need it doing either through age or scraping against rock/stone.

 

The usual trick is to weld a length of bar along the join so it protects the seam weld between the baseplate and the hull sides.  This is accepted by all the surveyors.

 

 

Correct 

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