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Nick-Now

Whats is a swim plate?

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Looking to buy a narrowboat, the survey of the boat I was looking at mentioned the thickness of the swimplate? Whats is it?

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I'd also go for the Uxter plate, sometimes called the counter plate.  It's the large flat plate at the stern immediately above the propellor.  Usually has the weed hatch built into it.

As Mike suggests, check with the surveyor.

 

 

 

Edited by NB Esk

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Seems to be used in Northern Ireland to refer to the armpits - as in "Have you washed your uxters?" Corresponds with the appropriate bits on the boat. Can't explain why.

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Cattle (humans too) are sometimes described as being up to their uxters in mud ........ so armpit would seem to be a pretty good definition!

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you should keep it shaved to prevent nasty weeds proliferating........................  there is nothing so embarrassing as having to have your uxters cleaned out, and jet-washing is quite painful.

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On 10/02/2020 at 10:12, Psychalist said:

Seems to be used in Northern Ireland to refer to the armpits - as in "Have you washed your uxters?" Corresponds with the appropriate bits on the boat. Can't explain why.

Am  I right in thinking many of the people that constructed the canals, (navvies), were recuited from Ireland? If so then I imagine that many would have become boatmen once the canal(s) became operational and the digging work dried up. This in turn would explain the use of what for them was the common useage.

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Probably was oxters - heard in an Ulster accent by me as uxters. Dictionaries have oxter as armpit, originating (mainly Scotland and Northern Ireland) from the C16 old English oxta, and Latin axilla (which refers to the underside of birds' wings). Seems to make sense but doesn't explain the u though. Perhaps it was an accent thing.

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