Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
Justin Smith

How are you supposed to come in to moor ?

Featured Posts

Quite a few posts on this thread mention crew. If you have crew then I don't really understand what the issue is? I bring in a big 30 tonne boat on my own - with varying degrees of success.

 

I think half the problem people have starts because they come in too fast and use too many revs to slow down. Then they are then forced to try to counteract the excessive revs and nine times out of ten they use too many revs to do that bit too, and so it goes on. 

 

I come in as slowly as possible and take the boat out of gear before approaching the bank letting it drift for a short time to see what it's doing. Then I go back into gear and apply the minimum revs to get the boat to do what I want it to do. It doesn't always work and occasionally I'll have to give it a blast in one direction or the other. But in most cases using high revs from the start for close quarters handling is unnecessary and just wrong.

Edited by blackrose
  • Greenie 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, blackrose said:

Quite a few posts on this thread mention crew. If you have crew then I don't really understand what the issue is? I bring in a big 30 tonne boat on my own - with varying degrees of success.

 

I think half the problem people have starts because they come in too fast and use too many revs to slow down. Then they are then forced to try to counteract the excessive revs and nine times out of ten they use too many revs to do that bit too, and so it goes on. 

 

I come in as slowly as possible and take the boat out of gear before approaching the bank letting it drift for a short time to see what it's doing. Then I go back into gear and apply the minimum revs to get the boat to do what I want it to do. It doesn't always work and occasionally I'll have to give it a blast in one direction or the other. But in most cases using high revs from the start for close quarters handling is unnecessary and just wrong.

agree, it's the same when you meet a boat and they slam full pelt into reverse it just stops but twists one way or other.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎12‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 20:02, blackrose said:

I think half the problem people have starts because they come in too fast and use too many revs to slow down. Then they are then forced to try to counteract the excessive revs and nine times out of ten they use too many revs to do that bit too, and so it goes on. 

 

I come in as slowly as possible and take the boat out of gear before approaching the bank letting it drift for a short time to see what it's doing. Then I go back into gear and apply the minimum revs to get the boat to do what I want it to do. It doesn't always work and occasionally I'll have to give it a blast in one direction or the other. But in most cases using high revs from the start for close quarters handling is unnecessary and just wrong.

Fully agree with both BlackRose and Billybobbooth!    Approach slowly, out of gear if need be, have the stern towards the middle of the cut, then get the bow pointing intowards where you want to be then slowly kick the stern in.     Using not much then engage gear ahead / astern with occasionl biger "kicks" on the engine when you have the helm in the right place will get your stern nicely alongside then you can step ashore with your centre line.       Have never used a crew memebr to get off from the bows, dont like the idea of trying to guess what they are doing 60 off ft away from the helm.....  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Dharl said:

Have never used a crew memebr to get off from the bows, dont like the idea of trying to guess what they are doing 60 off ft away from the helm.....  

Couldn't agree more - it may seem like a fine idea, but it's fraught with danger.

  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

Couldn't agree more - it may seem like a fine idea, but it's fraught with danger.

Also whilst Mrs Dharl is quite a good helmsman with locks and generrarly trundling aloing the cut,  (dont tell her I told you) when it comes to manorvering she sort of throws me the helm..or when it comes to casting off or tying up she says "oh you be OK without me?  I just need to check something in the galley / wash my hair / read a book" or simular which leaves me sort of single handed on those occasions!

 

 

Edited by Dharl
fat thumbs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually close my eye and hope for the best. 
it seems to work for me. ??

 

Failing that I come in at an angle Slowly when close in and nearly stopped I point the tiller bend towards the bank I put it in reverse slowly get close enough to step off with my centre rope ( which is now shorter ) and gently pull it in. 
usually works but not all the time. 

I’m still not confident after all these years in mooring between boats, on the G&S we are lucky to have big empty stretches at times. 
Even though the wife is with me I treat it as single handed and so most myself. 

Edited by rustydiver
  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/10/2019 at 10:19, rustydiver said:

I usually close my eye and hope for the best. 
it seems to work for me. ??

 

Failing that I come in at an angle Slowly when close in and nearly stopped I point the tiller bend towards the bank I put it in reverse slowly get close enough to step off with my centre rope ( which is now shorter ) and gently pull it in. 
usually works but not all the time. 

I’m still not confident after all these years in mooring between boats, on the G&S we are lucky to have big empty stretches at times. 
Even though the wife is with me I treat it as single handed and so most myself. 

I hope you don't close your eyes and hope for the best when returning to your mooring in the marina as I think we are now moored next to you ?

  • Happy 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

I hope you don't close your eyes and hope for the best when returning to your mooring in the marina as I think we are now moored next to you ?

Always alert like a Ninja when coming into the marina. ??

I go extra careful.

Are you there for the winter or permanent?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, rustydiver said:

Always alert like a Ninja when coming into the marina. ??

I go extra careful.

Are you there for the winter or permanent?

We've moved down from Great Haywood for the winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

We've moved down from Great Haywood for the winter.

It’s a small world

We Havnt been able to get there now for a few weeks. 
But will say Hi if your around when we are. 
simon. 

Edited by rustydiver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My method is very simple. Point the boat at where you want to hit. Back off the throttle and hope it doesn't hit too hard. Wait for crew member to stop shouting at you to (and I quote) "stop the bloody boat, you knob. Can't you get it any closer?" and step off the boat (usually from the opposite end of the boat from that which you have managed to get closest to the bank) with a centre rope. Attempt to, magically, bring the boat to a compete stop against any wind and/or current, perfectly centred next to aforementioned crew member and the nearest ring/bollard. Stop engine. Step off boat and tie up stern and bow lines in complete silence whilst avoiding any interaction with crew member for at least the next 15 - 20 minutes.

 

In the rare event that crew member actually ends up in the water, proceed as you would for single handed boating and avoid crew member for at least double the above time. Prepare to re-llve the experience, verbally, for at least the next 12 - 18 months, particularly if in company with other boaters. 

On 10/11/2019 at 21:57, system 4-50 said:

As a single hander, I've found the most important thing is to make sure you really are out of gear as you step ashore...

Even worse if you step off the boat on the side opposite your throttle control!

Edited by steve7a3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having a deep drafted historic boat, and now dragging a butty around makes it somewhat harder to moor up. The butty is deeper than some modern narrowboats, so end up needing to push a lot of water out of the way. Going astern on the motor to bring the pair to a stop easily ends up pushing you back out, even if someone has managed to get off the front. Sometimes, it's possible to jump ashore before the whole lot gets pushed out again. When mooring with the motor alongside the bank, especially at lock landings, having the boat moving slowly forward and strapping with the back end rail line works a treat.

 

When there is no such luxury, I've often found it's easier to reverse into a spot. The forward thrust to bring the boats to a stop help suck the boats into the bank better. Obviously, every mooring is going to be different, so size it up on a time by time basis. 

  • Greenie 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly not like this - a container ship in Antwerp which had broken adrift during strong winds,  and unfortunately found a very expensive container crane to make friends with!

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7775629/Dramatic-moment-towering-harbour-crane-crashes-ground-1-000ft-container-ship.html

 

Howard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, howardang said:

Certainly not like this - a container ship in Antwerp which had broken adrift during strong winds,  and unfortunately found a very expensive container crane to make friends with!

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7775629/Dramatic-moment-towering-harbour-crane-crashes-ground-1-000ft-container-ship.html

 

Howard

Ouch!! Just as well he'd have compulsory £3m third party insurance cover!

Of course, his insurance company will probably try to cite wear and tear on the mooring lines.

Edited by steve7a3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.