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Big Changes In Milton Keynes


Parahandy

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Everywhere I go I seem to be noticing changes to Moorings which basically implies even more restrictions . Newlands for example is now no more with Mooring being banned in front of the New Marina at Campbell Park , just North of there which is Bridge 82 ( By the Winding Hole ) is now also becoming 48 hr Mooring which will no doubt guarantee a Bonanza for the new Pub  which is currently half complete . Fenny Stratford Moorings have now been signposted as being 14 Days in any Calendar Year though quite how this will be enforced I dont know .

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People who want more restrictions are just adult babies that can't moor exactly where they want every time, with a perfect view, near a pub or on piling ,they think they are more important than anyone else, usually because their boat is worth more. They are the ones that invent the idea that others are "hogging" the moorings.

 

You have to take what you get wherever you go, that's always been the case. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, nicknorman said:

Your differing is accepted and agreed. No need to beg!
Whilst it’s never good to try to categorise people, perhaps there are 3 categories relevant to this issue, not 2 as I previously suggested. Splitting the live aboard boaters into two categories, those such as yourself who like to explore the system whilst happening to live aboard, and those who only have a boat because it is somewhere nice to live, perhaps in an otherwise unaffordable area. Only this last category is inconvenienced by the new restrictions

 

Only two categories of liveaboard? I (don't) beg to differ! I've lived aboard boats for coming up to 20 years and don't fit into either of those categories you describe. I live aboard because I like living on boats. So I agree with you, it’s never good to try to categorise people, and perhaps not  much better to try to refine those categories in order to dig oneself out of a hole. ?

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1 hour ago, CompairHolman said:

People who want more restrictions are just adult babies that can't moor exactly where they want every time, with a perfect view, near a pub or on piling ,they think they are more important than anyone else, usually because their boat is worth more. They are the ones that invent the idea that others are "hogging" the moorings.

 

You have to take what you get wherever you go, that's always been the case. 


I presume you have a widebeam? Well how else would that humongous chip fit inside with you?

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5 hours ago, nicknorman said:

One person’s restrictions are another person’s improvements. Ask yourself why CRT bothered to make those changes. I suggest because the canal in that area has a history of live aboard boats who hog the moorings and move as little as they can possibly get away with.

 

It boils down to whether you think the canals are a place to house people, or whether they are a leisure park for everyone’s recreation. My personal view is the latter, but of course I accept that for plenty of people it’s the former. Who is right?

 

Moorings that are 14 days a year at least improves the chances of a leisure boater being able to find somewhere to moor in that area when passing through on a cruise. Though I’m inclined to agree with your question about how it can be policed, and even whether it’s legal.

Social Housing Nick and surprisingly enough just not for the needy . The GU on the South East is literally awash with £180,000 Widebeams whilst People either rent out their Houses or pass them onto their children . A Liveaboard Boater is a complete hindrance to the CRT .

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24 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

No need for inventing anything.  There are many examples of hogging moorings I've come across.  In some cases the boat hasn't budged in years.  So who exactly is behaving like they're more important than anyone else?  And please don't make this into some kind of rich/poor or class thing.  It isn't, it's simply about being reasonable and trying to be equitable with a finite resource.

If a boat hasn't moved for a " years" its under enforcement action and there's nothing you can do about it until the court process has reached a conclusion. The whole CRT system is patrolled every ten days by licence and mooring checkers, there are no forgotten about boats mooring for year's in one spot.

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1 minute ago, CompairHolman said:

If a boat hasn't moved for a " years" its under enforcement action and there's nothing you can do about it until the court process has reached a conclusion. The whole CRT system is patrolled every ten days by licence and mooring checkers, there are no forgotten about boats mooring for year's in one spot.

Not necessarily.  But even if you're right, having clear guidance on staying times on visitor moorings will help to prevent this, and provides CRT a clearer argument to the courts. 

 

But I'm glad you've conceded the hogging of moorings is real, and not invented. ?

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16 minutes ago, CompairHolman said:

If a boat hasn't moved for a " years" its under enforcement action and there's nothing you can do about it until the court process has reached a conclusion. The whole CRT system is patrolled every ten days by licence and mooring checkers, there are no forgotten about boats mooring for year's in one spot.

Really? How's that then? No licence,  no registration, no name and no number. And a large bloke with an agressive dog who says it's his mate's. Who do CRT enforce it on?

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Under what legislation are CRT permitted to decide mooring time limits under 14 days?

 

( the " 14 days per calender year" has been around for decades and was always bogus ) 

2 minutes ago, Arthur Marshall said:

Really? How's that then? No licence,  no registration, no name and no number. And a large bloke with an agressive dog who says it's his mate's. Who do CRT enforce it on?

If no owner comes forward it's a section 8 craft the same as any abandoned vessel. 

 

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5 minutes ago, CompairHolman said:

Under what legislation are CRT permitted to decide mooring time limits under 14 days?

 

 

 

That old chestnut?

 

Well there's this:  https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/refresh/media/original/43839-general-terms-and-conditions-for-boat-licenses-june-2021.pdf

 

Backed up by https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/10-11/46/section/43

 

Now we all know that this legal approach has been disputed by some boaters, but it has not (to my knowledge) been challenged in court with regard to overstaying on short term visitor moorings.

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16 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

That old chestnut?

 

Well there's this:  https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/refresh/media/original/43839-general-terms-and-conditions-for-boat-licenses-june-2021.pdf

 

Backed up by https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz2/10-11/46/section/43

 

Now we all know that this legal approach has been disputed by some boaters, but it has not (to my knowledge) been challenged in court with regard to overstaying on short term visitor moorings.

1995 act says different.

 

"the applicant for the relevant consent satisfies the Board that the vessel to which the application relates will be used bona fide for navigation throughout the period for which the consent is valid without remaining continuously in any one place for more than 14 days or such longer period as is reasonable in the circumstances."

 

Add to that the fact that BW legal team told the select committee for the 1995 BW act bill that they only had limited powered to control moorings and they were entirely contained within the 1965 general canal bylaws. No mention of the 1962 Transport act section 43. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, nicknorman said:

I presume you have a widebeam? Well how else would that humongous chip fit inside with you?

 

Is that another of your stereotypical categories? 

 

1 hour ago, Parahandy said:

 A Liveaboard Boater is a complete hindrance to the CRT .

 

Really? Even those who follow CRT rules to the letter; those with residential moorings and those liveaboard boaters not even on CRT waters? This casual categorisation is getting worse and worse...

Edited by blackrose
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1 hour ago, Parahandy said:

Social Housing Nick and surprisingly enough just not for the needy . The GU on the South East is literally awash with £180,000 Widebeams whilst People either rent out their Houses or pass them onto their children . A Liveaboard Boater is a complete hindrance to the CRT .

They certainly are if they don't move much.

A lot of CCers (real ones, that is, who go places) rent out their houses so they've got somewhere to live when they've had enough of boating. I guess anyone who can afford a 180k widebeam would do the same as I imagine house price inflation, especially darn sarf, exceeds that of the boat.

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1 hour ago, David Mack said:

I thought there were 10 categories of boaters - those who understand binary, and those who don't...

Glad to see you got the reference... ?

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3 hours ago, CompairHolman said:

Under what legislation are CRT permitted to decide mooring time limits under 14 days?

 

( the " 14 days per calender year" has been around for decades and was always bogus ) 

If no owner comes forward it's a section 8 craft the same as any abandoned vessel. 

 

Section 18(1)(c) of the British Waterways Bill gave British Waterways the power to display notices preventing mooring more than a certain number of hours or days. 

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4 hours ago, CompairHolman said:

Under what legislation are CRT permitted to decide mooring time limits under 14 days?

 

( the " 14 days per calender year" has been around for decades and was always bogus ) 

If no owner comes forward it's a section 8 craft the same as any abandoned vessel. 

 

Seeing as how, for everyone except CCers, staying anywhere more than overnight is a concession, I'd wind your neck in if I were you!

Re second point, the vessel isn't abandoned, just unidentified. How do you identify an unidentifiable boat to section 8 it?

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