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rusty69

Anyone for the Chop?

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1 minute ago, TheBiscuits said:

"When I nod my head, hit it!"

Or.

When it gets to the top of it's travel don't allow it to catch on the top of the post and lose control

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3 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

Or.

When it gets to the top of it's travel don't allow it to catch on the top of the post and lose control

Ooh ? I can feel that head ache from here. 

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On 12/11/2018 at 07:54, mark99 said:

Thanks TM.

 

Can you recommend a Maul?

I got this set

https://www.screwfix.com/p/roughneck-log-splitter-set-3-pieces/48279?tc=MT5&ds_kid=92700019779902244&gclsrc=aw.ds&ds_rl=1241687&ds_rl=1245250&ds_rl=1249410&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs6L1j8Xq3gIVTUTTCh0pDwMmEAQYASABEgIxSfD_BwE

 

The splitting grenade works really well although it could spit out as TM says. Its split some nice holly logs for us.

 

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Here is a unusual splitter.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/finnish-man-invents-a-better-wood-splitting-axe-1.2624663

 

I reckon an experienced maul user could angle the head on his swing to get similar/same result.

 

Good chopping however.

 

We have an 18" diameter bole of a chopped down fir tree (roots still in) as the base and tyre as our chopping area.

 

 

Edited by mark99

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I've had the same axe for 30 years. It's needed a new head a couple of times and a new handle several times but it's lasted all that time.

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1 minute ago, aread2 said:

I've had the same axe for 30 years. It's needed a new head a couple of times and a new handle several times but it's lasted all that time.

Was it your grandfather's?

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11 minutes ago, aread2 said:

I've had the same axe for 30 years. It's needed a new head a couple of times and a new handle several times but it's lasted all that time.

Did You call it Trigger?

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I have been promised two old cherry trees... being sawn up by the surgeon ready to split on Wednesday nearby. Both trees have multiple trunks (2 and 3).  Wheel barrow is at the ready to port the logs down the lane to my store. Gonna be busy with the maul.

Edited by mark99
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On 14/11/2018 at 15:34, Tumshie said:

Just to add to the confusion 'maul' covers a multitude of sins and can also be a fencer's maul which isn't even an axe but a thing you whack fence posts in with. ?

My fencing Maul is called a Mell

 

Also my splitting Maul is called a Splitter

 

My Post Knocker is Called a Post Knocker, but hard hat advised at all times

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12 minutes ago, rasputin said:

My fencing Maul is called a Mell

Yeah pronounce it mell to, but I wondered if that was a colloquial thing because I also call this a streeeeecher

fullsizeoutput_668.jpeg

12 minutes ago, rasputin said:

but hard hat advised at all times

You weren't the one working with Tree Monkey were you? ?

Edited by Tumshie

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1 minute ago, Tumshie said:

Yeah pronounce it mell to, but I wondered if that was a colloquial thing because I also call this a streeeeecher

 

 

fullsizeoutput_668.jpeg

That's a monkey strainer, good bits of kit

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57 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

That's a monkey strainer, good bits of kit

monkey strainer from me too

 

Love old tools. I have had a few Billhooks but have 2 really old ones A stafordshire and a yorkshire , both hold their edge ages longer than the modern ones and don't make your arm ache if you use them all day.

 

Also like the name of my Shove(h)olers, and rhino pliers

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9 hours ago, rasputin said:

monkey strainer from me too

 

Love old tools. I have had a few Billhooks but have 2 really old ones A stafordshire and a yorkshire , both hold their edge ages longer than the modern ones and don't make your arm ache if you use them all day.

 

Also like the name of my Shove(h)olers, and rhino pliers

 

Been looking for a good Billhook on ebay. I can't work out with a log burner which is best - messing swinging and slashing, gathering wood, stacking it or burning it.  ;)

 

I want to get some horse chestnut for the spitting effect.

Edited by mark99

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44 minutes ago, mark99 said:

 

Been looking for a good Billhook on ebay. I can't work out with a log burner which is best - messing swinging and slashing, gathering wood, stacking it or burning it.  ;)

 

I want to get some horse chestnut for the spitting effect.

Get some eucalyptus and let it dry out completely,  you can then spend all day trying to split it, the satisfaction when you do actually split some will be massive :)

 

it is actually a good firewood but split it green

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On 27/11/2018 at 08:05, tree monkey said:

Get some eucalyptus and let it dry out completely,  you can then spend all day trying to split it, the satisfaction when you do actually split some will be massive :)

 

it is actually a good firewood but split it green

 

That applies to most woods, of course.  So I thought I'd get ahead and split and stack a beech I felled and cut into slices.  I've just staggered in with aching back arms and knees after struggling to split a half dozen of the rounds, only 6-9 ins thick!  I had to resort to the chainsaw to cut some of them up.  Should be good burning this time next year though.

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45 minutes ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

 

That applies to most woods, of course.  So I thought I'd get ahead and split and stack a beech I felled and cut into slices.  I've just staggered in with aching back arms and knees after struggling to split a half dozen of the rounds, only 6-9 ins thick!  I had to resort to the chainsaw to cut some of them up.  Should be good burning this time next year though.

Although it does, eucalyptus is particularly difficult, if I remember right the fibers tend to spiral and are tough.

It was the hardest wood I ever tried to split when seasoned

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8 hours ago, tree monkey said:

Although it does, eucalyptus is particularly difficult, if I remember right the fibers tend to spiral and are tough.

It was the hardest wood I ever tried to split when seasoned

 

There are however lots of types of eucalyptus tree, all very different in appearance. I have four types in my garden.  

 

Dunno how different the wood inside is though. The gardener needs to hack back one of them fiercely and regularly to keep it from bolting up. it really likes it in my garden!

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Split great - when it dries a bit out it gets stacked better.

 

 

Drying

 

 

20181130_115037.jpg

 

 

 

 

Dry

 

 

20181130_132458.jpg

Edited by mark99

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14 minutes ago, mark99 said:

Split great - when it dries a bit out it gets stacked better.

 

 

Drying

 

 

20181130_115037.jpg

 

 

 

 

Dry

 

 

20181130_132458.jpg

Oh that's border line porn  :)

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