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tjderby

decent alternatives to sawley marina.

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Well I've just had a phonecall from the electric board who are coming to uprate my main breaker on Monday so I will celebrate by baking a cake whilst running the dishwasher, washing machine, kettle and tumble dryer all at the same time without smoke coming from under the stairs.

Didnt have you down as the dishwasher and tumble dryer type tongue.png

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30A is low for an entire house, but anyway that is Carlt's choice - he could upgrade the wiring if he wanted to.

 

Ed - beaten to it!

Not my choice at all.

 

The wiring is upstream of the meter so it is the Electricity company's choice and it has taken 7 years and a small fire to get them to make the right choice.

Didnt have you down as the dishwasher and tumble dryer type tongue.png

Really?

 

The one thing I will really miss if I move back aboard is the dishwasher and the tumble dryer will most definitely come with me.

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Naughty Cal, on 04 Apr 2014 - 1:02 PM, said:

A lot of people live in older houses but even so 30 amp seems very low.

 

Of course lots of people do but there have been house built at a time that minimum specs. were not as 'generous' as they are now and have been for some time. The reference to the 'older house' was purely around the fact that if Carl lived in a new(ish) build then it would be highly unlikely his whole domestic supply would have such a low limit.

 

We used to live many years ago in an old Victorian Terrace house and whilst I can't recall the specific limit we had I do remember often tripping the supply and having to switch some stuff off, and we had neither a dishwasher nor a tumble drier so I suspect it was a similar set up to what Carl has put up with (until Monday)

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Of course lots of people do but there have been house built at a time that minimum specs. were not as 'generous' as they are now and have been for some time. The reference to the 'older house' was purely around the fact that if Carl lived in a new(ish) build then it would be highly unlikely his whole domestic supply would have such a low limit.

 

We used to live many years ago in an old Victorian Terrace house and whilst I can't recall the specific limit we had I do remember often tripping the supply and having to switch some stuff off, and we had neither a dishwasher nor a tumble drier so I suspect it was a similar set up to what Carl has put up with (until Monday)

 

Yes and a lot are rewired to cope with the demands of modern day living.

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TJ could always leave the boat where it is - ideal for the Bus to Ilkeston, all facilities on site, walking distance to the shops.

Handy for access onto the T&M, the Trent or the Soar.

 

The price for residential mooring is not unreasonable

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Naughty Cal, on 04 Apr 2014 - 1:23 PM, said:

 

Yes and a lot are rewired to cope with the demands of modern day living.

 

Yes of course - I don't believe I have said otherwise.

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Yes and a lot are rewired to cope with the demands of modern day living.

Part of the problem is that the house has been rewired to cope with the demands of modern day living.

 

The house had been occupied by the same lady since the 1930s and she had never uprated the wiring so there was one single bakelite socket in each room and old fashioned wiring throughout.

 

The house was rewired but the electricity company refused to upgrade the main circuit breaker which is a huge cast iron thing strangely full of tar which drips out of it when it is put under a slight load and finally caught fire.

 

The combination of a sensible number of sockets in each room and modern appliances has meant that the system is very easy to overload and they have finally agreed to upgrade it (after an engineer suggested they should remove it and give it to a museum).

 

Give me an alternator/inverter backed up with a decent genny any day over being bound to a private electricity company that puts profits before service and safety.

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Part of the problem is that the house has been rewired to cope with the demands of modern day living.

 

The house had been occupied by the same lady since the 1930s and she had never uprated the wiring so there was one single bakelite socket in each room and old fashioned wiring throughout.

 

The house was rewired but the electricity company refused to upgrade the main circuit breaker which is a huge cast iron thing strangely full of tar which drips out of it when it is put under a slight load and finally caught fire.

 

The combination of a sensible number of sockets in each room and modern appliances has meant that the system is very easy to overload and they have finally agreed to upgrade it (after an engineer suggested they should remove it and give it to a museum).

 

Give me an alternator/inverter backed up with a decent genny any day over being bound to a private electricity company that puts profits before service and safety.

 

Do you accept that your house is an unusual example, and that the vast majority of houses do have 100A or thereabouts electricity supplies?

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Do you accept that your house is an unusual example, and that the vast majority of houses do have 100A or thereabouts electricity supplies?

I have no idea, nor do I see the relevance.

 

Cherry picking one example out of many I offered does not diminish my argument.

 

There are far more complications associated with living in a house than living in a boat and whether or not one of those complications only applies to some houses is irrelevant.

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I may try and negotiation the price down a little. I don't mind paying £280 a month. So if they accept that I'll keep it where it is.

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Ok so I'm looking for a mooring. Have possibility of a mooring there. But at the cost of £3015pa. With 10% discount. Which I think is extortionate. I don't mind paying upto £2000pa. Any ideas?

 

 

I may try and negotiation the price down a little. I don't mind paying £280 a month. So if they accept that I'll keep it where it is.

Oh Tjderby !.

I'm no mathematician, but I love your negotiation skills !.

Edited by Paul's Nulife4-2

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No Paul you misunderstand. At sawley you pay it 10months and get 2 months free.

Ah right,,I will stick to eating Donuts,,I'm very good at that. It is worth checking to see exactly how much per month,against how much per year for your boat though,,just to make sure !.

All this money business makes my head spin.

Edited by Paul's Nulife4-2

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Lol I know what you mean. I checked when I put my offer in for her. It's £3400 standard mooring price and £3015 pa with 10% discount. Which isn't enough. Since they charge the same for any size boat. I mean why should I pay the same as a 60ft boat lol

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Yer,you see I'm crap at percentage calculations.

I just can't work them out to the same figures as you can. I would think you've got a little bit more than the 10%.

So your going for a residential mooring then !.

Not a leasure mooring that might be cheaper for you !.


Lol I know what you mean. I checked when I put my offer in for her. It's £3400 standard mooring price and £3015 pa with 10% discount. Which isn't enough. Since they charge the same for any size boat. I mean why should I pay the same as a 60ft boat lol

Edited by Paul's Nulife4-2

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Yer,you see I'm crap at percentage calculations.

I just can't work them out to the same figures as you can. I would think you've got a little bit more than the 10%.

So your going for a residential mooring then !.

Not a leasure mooring that might be cheaper for you !.

I can't go for a leisure mooring mate. As I'm going to be on her 365 days a year. And won't have additional address.

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Lol I know what you mean. I checked when I put my offer in for her. It's £3400 standard mooring price and £3015 pa with 10% discount. Which isn't enough. Since they charge the same for any size boat. I mean why should I pay the same as a 60ft boat lol

 

 

Err... because you are using the same mooring they could otherwise rent to a 60ft boat?

 

I'll also be impressed if you can get them to negotiate at all on the price. They won't want to set a precident or all the other moorers will want a lower rate too. I predict you'll be told 'that's the price, take it or leave it'.

 

MtB

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Oh right,,

Well then,get the best deal you can with them,I suppose it doesn't hurt to ask, But most marinas don't negotiate, there is just no point,I would think it's a supply and demand thing.

It does look a lovely marina,and a lot cheaper than mine,you never know I might come up for a gander!. Put my boat on brokerage with them and stay until it's sold !.

Edited by Paul's Nulife4-2

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I may try and negotiation the price down a little. I don't mind paying £280 a month. So if they accept that I'll keep it where it is.

 

I dont believe you will really risk losing a mooring (which 'ticks' all of your boxes) for the sake of £200

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I dont believe you will really risk losing a mooring (which 'ticks' all of your boxes) for the sake of £200

 

I wouldn't bet on that.

 

TJ appears to feel hard done by paying for the mooring length as opposed to the boat length and I can imagine him resenting this badly enough to tell them to shove it.

 

 

MtB

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I wouldn't bet on that.

 

TJ appears to feel hard done by paying for the mooring length as opposed to the boat length and I can imagine him resenting this badly enough to tell them to shove it.

 

 

MtB

Not particularly hard done by mike. Just done see why they don't do a mooring price by the foot like most marinas I've visited. Also the risk of flooding. Not to mention the cost DOESN'T include council tax as council tax isn't being unforced yet. That info from the mooring manager herself.

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Mind you Tjderby,

You could make the mooring to be an absolute bargain by getting a 60ft boat,and paying the same as a 40/45 ft boat !.

That's true Paul. But with 60ft boats comes a lot more expense lol. Not to mention hard for a single person to handle

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tjderby, on 04 Apr 2014 - 5:13 PM, said:

Not to mention the cost DOESN'T include council tax as council tax isn't being unforced yet. That info from the mooring manager herself.

 

I asked this question on Wednesday of this week and was told it includes Council Tax, VAT and everything - "what you see is the total of what you pay".

 

The council tax cost is only a very small percentage of the mooring cost (maybe something like £200) as the marina has an overall 'rateable value' and this is divided by the number of berths - it is not that each berth is paying Band A council tax.

 

The balance of the 'extra' cost vs a leisure mooring is made up of a mix of 'things' such as using more water, & filling the bins quicker (for example) than a weekend leisure moorer.

A leisure mooring can be re-let when its boat is away cruising - a residential boat very rarely leaves the mooring so the mooring cannot be re-let.

 

Marinas, Caravan Parks, Bed & Breakfast and Hotels pay 'Business rates' (not council tax). The Business rates are based on the number of 'beds'. And can be found listed as "Self Contained Holiday Units"

 

So a Caravan Park with say 4 caravans, each of which sleeps 4 people will have a rateable value (worked out on a formula by the VOA) of £3050 per annum. This is then adjusted by a 'multiplier' (varies by Local Authority) of 0.4710 to give a "Business Rate" of £1436.55

 

The caravan park owner can then apportion this amongst the total number of Caravans ie £359 per annum per caravan.

As opposed to each Caravan owner paying Band A council tax that would be around £1000-£1200 per annum

 

I do not know the "per bed" formula, or the Business Rate multiplier for Marinas but would assume (dangerous !!!) it is on a similar basis.

Edited by Alan de Enfield

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