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Chimney Fire


nina
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Restating what has been said many times before, but probably worth repeating.

 

If you do get one of those flue brushes and work it up and down the flue from outside, you may well dislodge loads of crud down into the stove, which can then fall on top of any combination of ledge, diverter or back-boiler, rather than falling right down into the grate or ash-pan.

 

It is very important that you don't create a blockage somewhere at the "back top" of your stove, which is just as detrimental, or perhaps even more so to it burning properly.

 

Often these "important little places" are quite hard to reach and keep clear of debris, but you do need to check regularly.

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I think it's a good idea. I'm going to have a look at ours and think about doing the same. Why wouldn't you? It makes good sense. I'm glad I posted this topic now. Think it might have given others some timely tips.

 

There are a few tips on this page BSS solid fuel stove advice

 

HiH

 

Regards

Rob

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All good stuff, I use a chain to clean out the Rayburn and the Squirrel once a month. I'd second Alan's advice to check where the soot and crud has gone though. When I bought Surprise, not only was the flue completely detached from the stove collar but the back boiler baffle was totally sooted up with only a 2'' hole with which to vent into the cabin. She'd passed her BSC only 2 days before .....

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Restating what has been said many times before, but probably worth repeating.

 

If you do get one of those flue brushes and work it up and down the flue from outside, you may well dislodge loads of crud down into the stove, which can then fall on top of any combination of ledge, diverter or back-boiler, rather than falling right down into the grate or ash-pan.

 

It is very important that you don't create a blockage somewhere at the "back top" of your stove, which is just as detrimental, or perhaps even more so to it burning properly.

 

Often these "important little places" are quite hard to reach and keep clear of debris, but you do need to check regularly.

 

Thats what i am worried about. My Squirel stove has one of these ledges and i cant seem to move it.

 

Anyone know how this is done? I should really clean my chimney but dont want a big build up of soot and dust above the ledge as Alan has said.

 

Regards

 

All good stuff, I use a chain to clean out the Rayburn and the Squirrel once a month. I'd second Alan's advice to check where the soot and crud has gone though. When I bought Surprise, not only was the flue completely detached from the stove collar but the back boiler baffle was totally sooted up with only a 2'' hole with which to vent into the cabin. She'd passed her BSC only 2 days before .....

 

How do i move the Squirrel 'ledge' for cleaning, mine seems to be stuck

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Thats what i am worried about. My Squirel stove has one of these ledges and i cant seem to move it.

 

Anyone know how this is done? I should really clean my chimney but dont want a big build up of soot and dust above the ledge as Alan has said.

 

Regards

 

 

 

How do i move the Squirrel 'ledge' for cleaning, mine seems to be stuck

 

I couldn't remove the back boiler on Surprise, so just slapped on a pair of rubber gloves and scooped it all out, by twisting my arm over and round, I removed the soot hrough a combination of pulling it out and letting it drop into the ashpan. Then rebrushed the chimney and scooped some more. It took about twenty minutes in total. It was a filthy job but well worth doing - after that a re-brush every month seemed to do the job.

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Thats what i am worried about. My Squirel stove has one of these ledges and i cant seem to move it.

 

Anyone know how this is done? I should really clean my chimney but dont want a big build up of soot and dust above the ledge as Alan has said.

 

Regards

 

 

 

How do i move the Squirrel 'ledge' for cleaning, mine seems to be stuck

 

From memory the plate is just laid on top of the ledge formed by the fire brick top edges. It's usually a bit of a wriggle to get out but I've never had one stuck completely. Have you tried thumping it firmly upwards?

Roger

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When I viewed my cottage, I asked the owner when the chimney was last swept. Well he said "I bought the house in 1946 and never had it swept, but set fire to the chimney a couple time a year to clear the soot". When I bought the cottage he showed me 'the technique'. Stack the fire with dry logs (wood burner), open up the bottom vent to draw the fire, open the chimney vent fully open. Within 15 minutes the chimney was roaring like a blowlamp with a flame roaring out of the chimney pot like a jet engine. I opted for the chimney sweep when it was time to sweep. Has to be said, the cottage was built in 1845 and the walls are 2ft 6ins thick.

 

Albert.

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I couldn't remove the back boiler on Surprise, so just slapped on a pair of rubber gloves and scooped it all out, by twisting my arm over and round, I removed the soot hrough a combination of pulling it out and letting it drop into the ashpan. Then rebrushed the chimney and scooped some more. It took about twenty minutes in total. It was a filthy job but well worth doing - after that a re-brush every month seemed to do the job.

I advocate the wriggle wiggle, I also bent a cheap old butter knief and used that as a scraper.

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Yikes! as I am terrified of fire ( after being rescued from 3 housefires when I was small) does my flue look faraway enough from the side of my boat ?? Matty 40, bless did check out my chimney for me, when he came to help out myself and starcoaster and said it was ok, and so was the fireboard surround. I was thinking of getting some nice tiles to make a feature out of the fire, yet now after reading these threads, maybe it would be best to go for the brass sheet option, as a newbie moving onto my boat fulltime next summer, any advice will be greatfully received. Here is a picture of my stove : http://s1229.photobucket.com/albums/ee476/treepoet1/?action=view&current=Triptpo012.jpg ,

 

Yikes! as I am terrified of fire ( after being rescued from 3 housefires when I was small) does my flue look faraway enough from the side of my boat ?? Matty 40, bless did check out my chimney for me, when he came to help out myself and starcoaster and said it was ok, and so was the fireboard surround. I was thinking of getting some nice tiles to make a feature out of the fire, yet now after reading these threads, maybe it would be best to go for the brass sheet option, as a newbie moving onto my boat fulltime next summer, any advice will be greatfully received. Here is a picture of my stove : http://s1229.photobucket.com/albums/ee476/treepoet1/?action=view&current=Triptpo012.jpg ,

Its on a 38ft cruiser-style narrowboat and I have 4 smoke alarms and 4 carbonmonoxide alarms, I know a bit extreme but best ot be safe than sorry :)

Edited by tree
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Yikes! as I am terrified of fire ( after being rescued from 3 housefires when I was small) does my flue look faraway enough from the side of my boat ?? Matty 40, bless did check out my chimney for me, when he came to help out myself and starcoaster and said it was ok, and so was the fireboard surround. I was thinking of getting some nice tiles to make a feature out of the fire, yet now after reading these threads, maybe it would be best to go for the brass sheet option, as a newbie moving onto my boat fulltime next summer, any advice will be greatfully received. Here is a picture of my stove : http://s1229.photobucket.com/albums/ee476/treepoet1/?action=view&current=Triptpo012.jpg ,

 

 

Its on a 38ft cruiser-style narrowboat and I have 4 smoke alarms and 4 carbonmonoxide alarms, I know a bit extreme but best ot be safe than sorry :)

Don't worry Tree,a nice tile design will be ok.Your stove looks like mine a (Boatman)jolly good little stoves,and in a 38' boat you could reduce the grate area by bricking it around therefore reducing the stoves body heat,it will only reduce the heat output a little but would be safer and save a lot of fuel.

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When I viewed my cottage, I asked the owner when the chimney was last swept. Well he said "I bought the house in 1946 and never had it swept, but set fire to the chimney a couple time a year to clear the soot". When I bought the cottage he showed me 'the technique'. Stack the fire with dry logs (wood burner), open up the bottom vent to draw the fire, open the chimney vent fully open. Within 15 minutes the chimney was roaring like a blowlamp with a flame roaring out of the chimney pot like a jet engine. I opted for the chimney sweep when it was time to sweep. Has to be said, the cottage was built in 1845 and the walls are 2ft 6ins thick.

 

Albert.

 

I was always told that throwing table salt on the fire would put out any chimney fires, I've never had a chimney fire to test it on, but the 'salt' thing does seem to be a bit of an old wives tale...

 

think i'd go with the sweeping option tbh !

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When I viewed my cottage, I asked the owner when the chimney was last swept. Well he said "I bought the house in 1946 and never had it swept, but set fire to the chimney a couple time a year to clear the soot". When I bought the cottage he showed me 'the technique'. Stack the fire with dry logs (wood burner), open up the bottom vent to draw the fire, open the chimney vent fully open. Within 15 minutes the chimney was roaring like a blowlamp with a flame roaring out of the chimney pot like a jet engine. I opted for the chimney sweep when it was time to sweep. Has to be said, the cottage was built in 1845 and the walls are 2ft 6ins thick. Albert.

 

Totally tried and tested method of cleaning chimneys and would work on solid stoves too. The crud in the chimney has to pass a 'flash-point' temperature to burn, but is actually 'pure' fuel. Firemen and Elf&Saferymen shit themselves when they hear of it but done by an 'expert' it works a treat. BUT! I would do it away out in the country, after rain, as it gives off some sparks. it's like everything else "It's only dangerous if you think it's not!"

Edited by Pentargon
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Totally tried and tested method of cleaning chimneys and would work on solid stoves too. The crud in the chimney has to pass a 'flash-point' temperature to burn, but is actually 'pure' fuel. Firemen and Elf&Saferymen shit themselves when they hear of it but done by an 'expert' it works a treat. BUT! I would do it away out in the country, after rain, as it gives off some sparks. it's like everything else "It's only dangerous if you think it's not!"

Sounds like a risk to me. I've heard of grates being damaged in normal use especially when using boiler fuel , let alone being superheated.If you had a boiler fitted you would be getting out the mop to clear up the water/antifreeze that would be released by the overflow.I've tried those soot reducing sachets which makes for an interesting light show but as I only use wood to start a fire and the flue is so short and accessible I still think a brush designed for the job is more than adequate.

Edited by JDR
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Don't worry Tree,a nice tile design will be ok.Your stove looks like mine a (Boatman)jolly good little stoves,and in a 38' boat you could reduce the grate area by bricking it around therefore reducing the stoves body heat,it will only reduce the heat output a little but would be safer and save a lot of fuel.

:) thank you Bizzard for advice, that will be added to my summer job list ;)

Edited by tree
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Thats what i am worried about. My Squirel stove has one of these ledges and i cant seem to move it.

Anyone know how this is done? I should really clean my chimney but dont want a big build up of soot and dust above the ledge as Alan has said.

How do i move the Squirrel 'ledge' for cleaning, mine seems to be stuck

 

I find I have to remove at least one of the side fire bricks to get the top plate out. Lift plate slightly, which will allow the side bricks to be tipped inwards. Usually, at his point, everything falls apart, and the various components can be removed through the door aperture. It's slightly easier if the door is lifted off its hinges first. Re-assembly is back fire brick in first, plate positioned on top and held up while the side bricks are replaced. I find it easier to feed the side bricks in base first, angled to go through the door.

 

Iain

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  • 1 month later...

I was always told that throwing table salt on the fire would put out any chimney fires, I've never had a chimney fire to test it on, but the 'salt' thing does seem to be a bit of an old wives tale...

 

think i'd go with the sweeping option tbh !

 

Our cottage was built around 1650 AD and when we had a chimney fire I was concerned that one of the beams passed into the chimney breast and could ignite. The fire brigade advised me to damp down the fire by chucking water on the fire (open hearth) saying that the steam would do the job by damping and starving the fire of oxygen. I did this and by the time the crew got there the fire was out.

 

Phil

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I swept my chimney and burner at the beginning of November. I have a fire most nights, and burn mostly coal, but wood also. Yesterday I noticed that the fire wasn't pulling properly, so removed chimney and cleaned everything again. About 90% blocked.

 

That's SIX weeks.

 

Think about it.

 

I thought about it and I've come to the conclusion that you must be doing something wrong! If your flue is 90% blocked that's quite alarming. I liveaboard, burn both wood and coal and I sweep my chimney & flue once a year. I've been doing that on this boat for six years and on a previous boat for 3 years. I've only ever had a small amount of soot in the flue. However, the baffle plate inside the stove does collect quite a lot of soot and should be checked a couple of times per winter.

 

To be honest, if I got a chimney fire on this boat I'd just watch it and wait until it went out (assuming I was in, aware or awake). I installed the stove and as well as a thick collar, where the flue goes through the roof there are no flammable materials within 8" - 10" all the way around.

Edited by blackrose
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