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Albion

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Albion last won the day on August 11 2018

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  1. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    That's not quite what was explained when my wife and I visited the Waitangi Treaty Grounds and Museum on March 15th, this year. The issue described then in the museum was that the treaty was written in English and translated into Maori by some New Zealanders of European descent (Paheka) and that the translation might not have been strictly accurate so that the Maori chiefs signed something that didn't have the same underlying meaning as the English version. The only issue that wasn't determined in the museum was whether it was a deliberate mistranslation (to mislead the Maoris) or an accidental mistranslation due to the subtleties of the two languages. They indicated that both versions of the mistranslation were a valid point of view but it could not be determined which was truly accurate. Our Maori guide said that he thought it was time that the Maoris stopped raking up the past and protesting. Roger
  2. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    I'm not 100% sure that one on that list is correct which might throw doubt on some of the others about whom I have no idea (could be correct, could be incorrect). Caroline Flint was I believe a remainer in the referendum but represents a leave constituency. She has since pushed for a deal as part of the Brexit negotiations but now, I think, believes that Brexit should be delivered to honour the democratic referendum result. Can she really be called a prominent remainer when compared to say Anna Soubry further up the list? See: https://www.politico.eu/list/brexit-40-troublemakers-ranking/caroline-flint/ and even in the Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/feb/05/parliament-vote-brexit-deal-now Roger
  3. It's not bad at all. Just get stuck in and sort the problem. 😀 Roger
  4. If you do have a go and it sorts the problem (or even if it doesn't) then it would a good idea to feed back the info to this thread so that others can perhaps learn from the experience. Always useful info for others. Although certain members might think the idea of reaching inside is gross it isn't, in reality, a problem at all provided you have given the cassette a good flush before you undertake the repair. Roger
  5. You'll have to bear with me on this repair as it is quite a few years since I sorted the problem on the several cassettes that I had. The magnet is mounted on a swinging arm inside the case which is restrained from moving too far by protruding lumps sticking out from the inside surface. If the cassette is swung around too violently, when swilling with water after emptying for example, the arm can get dislodged past the lower protrusion and hangs down inside the cassette. When the level rises the arm cannot move up far enough to switch the light on because it is trapped below the lowest protrusion. I removed the sliding plate, rubber diaphragm etc (from memory, two covering plastic quarter-moon shaped things which when unclipped allow access to 6 retaining screws underneath) and reached inside to force the arm back up over the limiting protrusion to its correct position (it really doesn't have a huge range of motion when located correctly). Then reassemble. I was pretty convinced that it was the vigorous shaking when flushing out the cassette that caused the problem and adopted a new flushing technique which was to stand, leaning over the cassette and looking at the top of it, then swing the cassette in a rotary motion (bit like the hands of a clock say between 10 minutes past and 10 minutes to the hour). I never had the problem recur after changing my technique. Hope this helps. Roger
  6. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Iain, you've forgotten one other figure that is higher in Scotland than England: Finances Roger
  7. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Good point but, in that case, I would have expected the headline to read 'Peugeot-Vauxhall' to indicate the plant/s involved. Roger
  8. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Shouldn't one also take into account the huge slump for April by taking the sub-title from your own Guardian link: April manufacturing fell 44.5% as factories shut down for an EU exit that never came After all, if production, was shut down in April by bringing forward the annual shutdown in order to avoid the disruption to the supply chain anticipated at the Brexit deadline (which never activated) then it is hardly surprising that production would slump more than usual during that month. Closed factories do not produce cars, surely. Further down your own Guardian linked article it also states (my underlining for clarity): The majority of the decline in production was down to large automotive firms such as Jaguar Land Rover, BMW and Peugeot bringing forward annual maintenance stoppages that usually take place in the summer. This para seems to indicate that Peugeot also closed down in preparation and yet they closed their last UK plant at Ryton, near Coventry, in 2006. Why did they, a French based company, also choose to close down and yet they have no UK presence? There are other potential reasons why they have shut a French plant in 2013 and let a Chinese company buy a 14% stake and build plants in China that could also explain why even a non-UK manufacturer is reducing output that cannot totally be laid at the door of Brexit uncertainty. Roger
  9. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    The only document that was the official route for the future was the Wilson Government one sent to every home. Any of the other pamphlets had no official standing of course as well you know and were not sent to every home. I, for example, never saw one of the 'no-campaign' propaganda publications because it wasn't sent to each home and I'm sure I wasn't the only one. Therefore, if you cannot explicitly illustrate an example of closer union in the Government document then I'm afraid your original statement was incorrect. Roger
  10. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Let's just go back to your assertion of #12757 where you accused Mr Smelly of not paying attention to what was explicitly included in the 'pro-remain in the Common Market (EC)' 1975 Wilson Government leaflet to every household and my challenge in #12766, to indicate in that document an explicit inclusion for the result of remaining in the Common Market becoming de facto a political union (remaining in the Common Market which I voted for by the way at the time) when the only statement using those words in that document was that we were not going to be drawn into an Economic and Monetary Union (My challenge has not been answered, I note). Definition of explicit from the Oxford English dictionary: Stated clearly and in detail, leaving no room for confusion or doubt. Now, tell us again just how explicit the statement was about becoming a political union when all you can refer to is a claim in a document that supported 'not remaining' in the Common Market and when the Government document clearly states that we will not move towards an Economic and Monetary Union. I suggest two courses of action are available to you: 1. Apologise to Mr Smelly for having been incorrect or 2. Indicate where in that Government document of the time that it states explicitly that we are going to be in a political union and prove us incorrect. Roger
  11. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Please point out in this linked 1975 Referendum Leaflet for remaining in the Common Market where it explicitly includes an ever closer union. http://www.harvard-digital.co.uk/euro/pamphlet.htm In fact, the only reference to the phrase 'ever closer union' that I can find seems to be this paragraph below which says, to my mind, that there was no intention to move towards an ever closer Economic and Monetary Union (with my underlining to highlight). But I would be interested to read your interpretation of anything in the document that you claim supports your explicitly included: There was a threat to employment in Britain from the movement in the Common Market towards an Economic & Monetary Union. This could have forced us to accept fixed exchange rates for the pound, restricting industrial growth and putting jobs at risk. This threat has been removed. Roger
  12. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    But Alan has included the SNP in his chart but, admittedly, not in his wording. Did you mean Plaid Cymru, Carl, which isn't in the chart but is Remain supporting? Roger
  13. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    I'm not entirely sure that the EU negotiators really played a blinder if you have seen the recent couple of 'Storyville - Brexit behind closed doors' - TV programs. That exposed a slightly apprehensive EU team initially wondering how difficult it was going to be to negotiate with UK negotiators, that then turned to amused contempt when the opposition turned out to be inept and then, finally, to open mocking derision when our people capitulated to their every demand and were completely useless. It was a very interesting couple of programs done by a Belgian film maker IIRC. Roger
  14. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    In all probability Independents (who did well this time round) and any candidates other than the two main parties. This protest vote has also resulted in a big increased vote for the Lib Dem’s. Roger
  15. Albion

    Brexit 2019

    Yes, but had they been open and honest and called it a second referendum it would have had implications of 'We didn't like your first vote result so we'd like you to have another try' as has been done in other EU countries. That would likely have stirred up more opposition than calling it a 'People's vote' or a 'Confirmatory vote' as those names have a more subtle, less in-your-face, implication for most listeners. Roger
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